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Archive for September, 2018

https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/290068996/stream?client_id=N2eHz8D7GtXSl6fTtcGHdSJiS74xqOUI?plead=please-dont-download-this-or-our-lawyers-wont-let-us-host-audio

September 29, 2018: a new episode of The Anatomy Lesson at 11pm EST on CFRC 101.9fm. live now. Music from Cop Funeral, Wolfarena, Emergency Broadcast Network, Yves Tumor, Clarice Jensen, SPRRW, Coil, Body Sculptures + more. Check out the whole setlist below, tune in at 101.9 on your FM dial, stream at http://audio.cfrc.ca:8000/listen.pls or listen to the finished show on cfrc.ca or a special archive on mixcloud here: https://www.mixcloud.com/cameronwillis1232/the-anatomy-lesson-september-28-2018/

A-Sun Amissa – “Promise of the Loss of Salt” Beneath the Heavy Tides (2011)
Wolfarena – “Slow Moving Death on Bridge 277″ Dawn on Bridge 277 (2018)
SPRRW – “Messages” Decay of Courage (2018)
Body Sculptures – “Body Prison” The Base of All Beauty Is The Body (2015)
Yves Tumor – “Hope in Suffering (Escaping Oblivion & Overcoming Powerlessness)” Safe In The Hands of Love (2018)
Coil – “Baptism of Fire” How To Destroy Angels – 

A Slow Fade To Total Transparency
(1983/2018)
Clarice Jensen – “For This From That will Be Filled (a)”

For This From That will Be Filled (2018)
L.A. County Morgue – “Untitled XVI” Melbourne (2013)
Sean Derrick Cooper Marquadt – “Sons of Reagan (Return of Voodoo Economics)” Split with Bird Paradigme (2012)
Cop Funeral – “Sick of Dreams” 2 Stressed 2B Blessed (2016)
Religious Visions – “Dark Age of Winter” Songs of Faith (1985)
Emergency Broadcast Network – “Behavior Modification / We Will Rock You (Crowd Control)” Behavior Modification / We Will Rock You (1992)

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Yan Morvan, Iran-Iraq War. “Bassidj” militiaman on the Abadan front, September 1980. Source.

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raveneuse:

Ron Athey. Martyrs and Saints, Four Scenes in a Harsh Life (1994)

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Detail from 

William-Adolphe Bouguereau, Égalité devant la mort. Oil on canvas, 1848. Musée d’Orsay, accession number: RF 20107

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“Sinn Feiner Gets 15 Years In Prison,” Toronto Globe. September 28, 1918. Page 07.

J. E. Plant’s Sentence Of Death Is Commuted – ‘Conchy’ Given 10 Years.

(Canadian Press Despatch.)
Niagara Camp, Sept. 27. – The first drafted man in camp to be sentenced to death by the general court-martial is John Edward Plant of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Central Ontario Regiment, whose sentence was promulgated this afternoon at a garrison parade. His sentence, however, has been commuted to fifteen years’ imprisonment in the penitentiary at Kingston, and this was read at the promulgation by Captain Roy Parke, Adjutant of the 2nd Battaltion, 2nd C.O.R. Plant is a Sinn Feiner, and refused to perform military service in any capacity.

Johnston Marks of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd C.O.R., who is a conscientious objector and refused to put on uniform, was sentenced to penitentiary for ten years.

Col. K. I. McLaren, Camp Commandant, was in charge of the parade for the promulgation of the sentences.

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“Inside Kingston Penitentiary – Ten Years After Canada’s Most Infamous Prison Riot,” Saturday Night. September 1981. Pages 34 & 35.

Part onePart two.

.

 

TERRY Decker, Thirty-Six, Was Attacked and Taken Hostage During The 1971 riot. ‘First they moved us into an air duct. They kept us there for a couple of hours. Then they started locking us away, three to a cell. They made us take off our uniforms and put on inmate clothing. They figured there wouldn’t be any trouble if the people outside didn’t know who was an inmate and who wasn’t. They moved us every couple of hours from one range to another. I don’t know if they did it to confuse our guys, or the inmates who might have wanted to get at us.’

The hostages were treated with an unpredictable mixture of violence and consideration. ‘I was punched pretty good,’ says Decker. ‘They flattened a disc in my back and burst a blood vessel in my eyeball.’ At the same time, he and the other hostages were given double rations. ‘If the inmates got one sandwich, we got two. And tobacco – we had more than we could ever have smoked. I have no complaints there.’ Decker was released as a show of good faith during the negotiations. He’d been held for forty hours. ‘As I was coming out, one lifer said to me, ‘It pays not to be a dog, eh?’

Four months after the incident, he returned to work. He required extensive physiotherapy and cortisone shots in the spine, but since 1973 his health has been sound. Of the six guards held hostage, Decker is the only one who still works in security – he’s now at Collins Bay penitentiary. Two of the hostages have died; one quit; one took a medical pension; one works as a groundskeeper at Millhaven. Only a portion of the prison has been restored. Several ranges have never been reopened, and the top two tiers of the functioning ranges remain sealed off. Prior to posing for this photograph, Decker had not set foot in the part of the prison where he was held hostage since the riot ten years ago. ‘I was in fear for my life all the time.’

‘THERE’S No Call For This Trade Outside,’ Says The Instructor In the Mail bag repair shop, where these inmates were photographed during a coffee break, ‘but it helps the guys do their time and provides a few dollars for upkeep.’ Last year inmates in the shop repaired five thousand bags a week. The penitentiary earns a dollar for each mailbag it repairs, but eighty four cents goes to materials. Work programmes at Kingston – like hobby and recreational activities – are curtailed by outdated facilities. The only work of rehabilitative value is data processing. Inmates are coding the records of the National Museum of Science and Technology into computer banks. ‘We’re going to get a lot more terminals,’ says Andrew Graham, the warden. ‘It’s a popular programme, and it’s a skill that’s very much in demand on the street.’

Inmates used to be paid a pittance. Last May, however, the federal pay scale was revised to coincide with civilian minimum wage rates, less the eighty-five percent of income that Statisticcs Canada calculates a single man would spend on food, lodging, and clothes. Depending on the nature of his work, a prisoner in a federal institution came between $3.15 and $5.90 a day in maximum security, $3.70 and $6.45 in medium, and $4.80 and $7.55 in minimum. Twenty-five per cent of his pay is withheld as compulsory savings. An inmate serving a lengthy sentence now has the opportunity of returning to civilian life with a few thousand dollars, rather than a few hundred.

There are good reasons for the graduate pay scale. The first is the cost of incarceration. To keep an inmate in maximum security costs $35,800 a year, versus $22,600 for medium security and $18,400 for minimum. (In a community correctional centre – where inmates work at civilian jobs and return to custody each night – the cost is $11,500. The cost of parole is $1,600 a year.) The graduated pay scale also encourages inmates to behave well in order to qualify for an institution with a lower security rating – and a higher pay scale.

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