Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘‘austrian’ immigration to canada’

“Dom. Police To Stand Trial On Robbery Charge,” Sudbury Star. August 10, 1918. Page 08.

Officers Attached to Local Squad Out on $1,500 Bail Each

The preliminary trials of W. H. Good and F. W. Thompson, Dominion Police stationed at Sudbury and charged with robbing three Austrians of the sum of $95 on the evening of Friday, August 2, were heard in Sudbury police court Wednesday morning and afternoon. Magistrate Brodie, after hearing the crown`s witnesses committed the prisoners to stand trial at the next jury sitting of the Supreme Court, December 2nd. Bail was fixed at $1,500 for each prisoner, $1,000 of their own recognizance, and two sureties of $500 each. Charles Taylor, of Sudbury, is the bondsman. The officers have been suspended from the service.

The first witness to tesity, Evan Slobodan, an Austrian, a laborer on the C.P.R., living in a boarding car, indentified the prisoners, saying that they were the men who on Friday, August 2, came to his car about six o`clock, and started to look through his belongings. When asked to show their badge the policemen did so. Officer Good then felt his pockets and told him to lay his belt on the table, the belt containing a bank book and $140, after which Good told him to show him the contents of his grip at the other end of the car. In the meantime Thompson was counting over the money in the belt. At this juncture, according to the evidence, Good picked up a dagger on the table and asked the Austrian for his papers, but before he could produce them the officers left the car. Slobodian immediately counted his money and discovered that two ten dollar bills and four five dollar bills, $40 in all, was missing. About nine o’clock he complained to the police and accompanied them until the accused were found in Taylor’s pool room.

L. Ardrechich, another witness, in giving evidence said he was stopped by the Dominion policemen in the same care, but that after making him take off his belt and counting the money they handed it all back to him. Asked by the Crown if he was asked for any papers, witness stated that he was not. The only thing that the officers had told him was that he would have to appear in court for having so much money on him. After Good and Thompson left the car he knew nothing more of the happenings until a constable told him to come down to the police station. That was about nine o’clock the same evening.

PUT UP YOUR HANDS.
Steve Dedick looks after the lights on the switches in the C.P.R. yards and claimed to have seen accused come out of one of the boarding cars. He met the officers and was told to put up his hands, and while Thompson was searching him, Good put handcuffs on him. They then told him to take them to the car. Upon reaching the car Thompson took the money out of his pocket and then he was told to unlock the car door. On arriving inside the car, Good asked Dedick to show him his valise, and it was while searching this that Good told Thompson to take $40 out of teh $70 they had taken from Dedik’s pocket. Witness was told to be in the car at 11 o’clock that night as he would have to appear in court, but when they went outside he was told that if he would give ten dollars more it wouldn’t be necessary to appear in court. Witness made no complaint and said nothing about the incident until about ten o’clock Friday night, when a constable came for him and asked him to go to the police station, when he saw Good and Thompson.

The court then adjourned until two o’clock in the afternoon when Metro Cosczuk, another witness, also identified the prisoners as the men he had seen when he entered Dedik’s car on Friday last. Witness said the officers felt his pockets and asked him if he had any knives or guns and after being told that he hadn’t, they told him to stay in the car until they got out.

Steve Maszuk’s story did not throw any new light on the affair other than he had $75 on his person, but was not searched. Before the accused left, they asked him if he knew if any of his partners had any guns or knives.

SERGT. SCOTT’S EVIDENCE.
Sergt. Short testified that about nine o’clock on August 2, Solbodian came to the police station and laid a complaint that he had been robbed and described the men. A search was started and at the post office corner he met constable White and instructed him to go with Slobodian and search the hotels and pool rooms, after which the witness went up to the C.P.R. station. It was while at the C.P.R. station with Chief Brown that constable White had made an arrest. On his return to the police station Sergt. Scott assisted Chief Brown search Good and Thompson. They found $94.75 on the former, and a revolvver, and $4.00 on the latter. Handcuffs were also found on both men.

THE ARREST.
Constable White told of meeting Sergt. Scott and being told to search the various pool rooms and hotels and told how Slobodian had picked out the prisoners in Taylor’s pool room.

Chief Brown stated that he was present when the search of the prisoners was made and that when he asked them where they got the money, Good replied that it was his pay as a Dominion policeman and some pension money.               

Read Full Post »

“Sudbury Police Court,” Sudbury Star. August 10, 1918. Page 05.

Magistrate Brodie intimated in Friday morning’s court that from now on he was going to fine all alien enemies for not carrying papers and Mich. Radomski and D. Mumylyk, hailing from Romford, paid ten dollars and costs for failing to have received permission to come to Sudbury.

IN WRONG, SURE.
Peter Yabokoski was found in an intoxicated condition at the C.P.R. depot Thursday night and when he was searched it was discovered that he had left his papers in a grip at Murray Mine where he had been working. It cost him $10 and costs his fount of joy, and five and costs for not having his papers.

PREVIOUS RECORD COUNTED.
Leon  Michiniowicz was charged with not being employed at a useful occupation on the 9th day of July. He stated that he had worked at the Mond smelter at Coniston but had left owing to ‘his work injuring his health.’ At the time of his arrest he was learning to run a jitney car and at the preent has a jitney. His worship in dismissing the case gave Michniowicz a chance, seeing that he had worked at the smelter five years.

ALLOWED TO GO.
Jules Chalifoux, who was arrested sometime ago for stealing a sum of money on the 3rd of July was allowed to go Friday, owing to the fact that the plaintiff in the charge cannot be located.

A Conistion party appeared Thursday morning to have a family quarrel straightened out. Peter Petryna claimed that Tomas Bilyj had trhown a bottle at him and struck him on the back as he was removing some cases which Bilyj had thrown on the defendant’s property. Much abusive language was exchanged reflecting on both families and the complaint was laid as a result. Magistrate Brodie told the parties interested that the affair was a small thing, expressing a hope that they would go back and live in harmony with one another, and try to patch up there differences. Bilyj was fined $1 and costs.

$200 AND COSTS.
On Wednesday, Alex. Juval requested the court to let his charge of having liquor in other than a private dwelling stand over until Thursday morning, and after having slept over it, he pleaded guilty to the charge and paid $200 and costs.

CASE DISMISSED.
The charge against E. Waugh of having more than fifteen days’ supply of flour on hand was dismissed on Thursday, as the court was convinced that he did not have an over supply of flour at one time. In fact, evidence was brought forward to the effect that it would only last him about fifteen days.

THREE STAR BRANDY
When Nathaniel James was told that he was charged with being drunk he pleaded guilty and told his Worship that he was drinking Three Star brandy. It cost Nat. $10 and costs, and he was told that if he didn’t leave the stars alone it would be a prison term next time.

TOOK CHANCE
Horace Chamberlain admitted that he was in a hurry and that he passed a standing street car while pasengers were alighting.

‘If you are willing to take those chance it will cost you $5 and costs,’ said his Worshhip.

BACK AGAIN
Hilda Maki, Coniston, after having just been released from the reformatory, again appeared at the court Thursday. The magistrate did not read any charge against the woman, but remanded her to enable two physicians to examine her and ascertain the condition of her mental faculties.

Read Full Post »

“Copper Cliff Police Court,” Sudbury Star. August 3, 1918. Page 04.

For driving his auto without front lights Negosanti Wario, an Italian, was fined $1 and costs in Wednesday’s police court.

Geo. Lark, of Sudbury, paid $1 and costs for driving his car without a front marker.

Henry Renni, Finlander, also failed to burn two front lights, and paid $1 and costs. The law now is that both lights, not one as formerly, must be burning after dusk.

Richard Death, Sr., charged with having neither front or rear lights, produced a witness, in addition to himself to counteract the evidence of the policeman, and was given the benefit of the doubt by Magistrate Stoddart.

In Friday’s police court, Leone Satore, Italian, drunk in Copper Cliff on July 19th, paid $20 and costs. An analysis of the liquor which proved his undoing, showed it to be 19.87 per pecent. proof spirits, and Crema Mario, the owner, paid $200 and costs for a breach of the O.T.A. in having liquor in other than a private place.

Henry Rintamski, a returned soldier, neglected to burn a rear light on his motor cycle, and was let down with payment of court costs.

P. J. Grenon didn’t have either rear or side lights on his side-car motor cycle. $1 and costs.

Liugi Palma, Italian, parted with $1 and costs for failing to burn front lights.

Read Full Post »

“Hold-up Last Night In the C.P.R. Yards,” Sudbury Star. August 3, 1918. Page 01.

About six o’clock Friday night two men entered the boarding car at the C.P.R. coal yard and held up three Austrians at the point of a revolver and relieved them of $50, $40 and $5 respectively, making their getaway.

The Austrians communicated with the police and about 10 o’clock P. C. White arrested W. H. Good and F. W. Thompson, two Dominion policemen in a pool room while engaged in a game of pool.

When charged with robbery on Saturday morning in the police court the two men pleaded not guilty, and were remanded till Monday morning.

Read Full Post »

“Three Years in Kingston For Daniel Gerome,” Hamilton Spectator. July 9, 1918. Page 01.

Man Who Wielded Knife Must Also Pay $500 

Another Foreign Stabbing Affray Aired In Court

Bicycle Thief Given Term in Local Jail

Three years in Kingston penitentiary and a fine of five hundred dollars was the sentence handed out by Judge Gauld to-day to Daniel Gerome, who stabbed M. Gaspar. Two hundred dollars of the fine will go to the injured man.

IN passing sentence his honor pointed out the seriousness of the offence, and also observed that the depletions of the police force by the M.S.A. might tend to cause individuals to take the law more in their own hands.

If the fine is not paid two more years will be tacked on to the sentence.

R. J. McKenna was the prisoner’s solicitor.

CASE ADJOURNED
Anthony Ponsoni and Umbuti Scaccki were charged with assaulting Roceo Celesto.

Colesto claimed one of the prisoners met him in a store on Sherman avenue and challenged him to a fight.

The man stood with clenched hands in his pockets, and then Celesto decided to get in the first wallop. When the trio got outside the two men, he alleged, attacked him. One of them three a stone, which knocked him down, and the other jumped on him and slashed him with a razer. Celesto showed the court various wounds about the head and neck, alleged to have been inflicted in this manner.

Miss Annie Otto, a nurse at the city hospital, who attended Celesto, testified that if the cuts about the head had been a little deeper the patient might have died.

The case was adjourned until this afternoon at 2 o’clock.

M. J. O’Reilly, K.C., is acting for the prisoners.

THREE MONTHS
Although Harry Case pleaded not guilty to the charge of stealing a bicycle from Charles Lovett on June 14, and insisted he bought the wheel for $8, his horror sentenced him to three months in jail. Constable McLean laid the charge. C. W. Bell represented the prisoner.

SUSPENDED AND REMANDED
T. A. Cutss, a mechanic in the Royal Air Force, who was accused of stealing a car, was allowed to go suspended setence. Pte. William Smith, who was arrested along with him on the same charge, was again remanded for sentence. Smith, it appears, was the instigator of the act. He asked Cutts to go for a ride with him, it was stated.

Read Full Post »

“Two Years For Forgery,” Toronto Globe. July 5, 1918. Page 02.

Austrian Did It to Enable Compatriot to Leave Country.

(Special Despatch to The Globe.)
London, Ont., July 4. – For forging the name of Rev. V. Kosorissoff to enable a fellow-countryman to leave this country, Dionisc Woloshin, an Austrian, was sentenced to two years in Kingston Penitentiary by Magistrate Graydon this morning. He was arrested in Windsor at the time of the recent trouble at Ford City.

Read Full Post »

“Escaped Prisoner Recaptured,” Toronto Globe. May 10, 1918. Page 09.

Austrian From Burwash Camp Taken at Niagara-on-the-Lake.

(Special Despatch to The Globe.)
Niagara Falls, Ont., May 9. – John Roze, an Austrian, who escaped from the internment camp at Burwash, Ont., has been arrested at Niagara-on-the-Lake, and will be sent back to Burwash. He escaped from Burwash some months ago, and a Province-wide search for him failed to locate him.

Roze managed to get over the Niagara River, and was subsequently arrested and given a forty days’ sentence in the County Jail at Lockport, his real identity not being suspected. After being released from Lockport Jail he crossed the river at Niagara-on-the-Lake to visit his parents. He was walking along the road when Pte. Leonard of the Military Police saw him, and thinking he looked suspicious questioned him. Roza’s broken English convinced the soldier that he had better take the man to headquarters. His description was sent broadcast, and Provincial Police identified the man as the escaped prisoner.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »