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Posts Tagged ‘break and enter’

“Convict’s Thrilling Escape: Leaps From Fast Train,” Toronto Globe. November 25, 1918. Page 08.

Man With Bad Record in Toronto Fools County Constable and Flees Near Shannonville – Recaptured at Napanee

John Gowans, who was on his way to Kingston penitentiary, where he was to commence a second five-year sentence for housebreaking, escaped from the custody of County Constable Frank Brown near Shannonville on Saturday morning. Gowans made his escape by obtaining permission to go to a lavatory, and then by leaping from the window of the train after he had slammed the door upon Constable Brown.

Gowans was the housebreaker who entered the house of the widow of the late Dr. Fenton, and assaulted her when she endeavored to hold him until the arrival of police. He was later arrested, and only recently completed his sentence. Judge Winchester on Wednesday sentenced Gowans to five years’ imprisonment upon convictions registered against him for housebreaking in Parkdale.

The convict was recaptured at Napanee on Saturday just before midnight.

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“Communist Jailed As Church Robber,” Montreal Gazette. October 18, 1938. Page 10. 

R. Lepage Gets Seven Years After Pleading Guilty to Over 20 Charges

Pleading guilty yesterday to more than 20 charges of theft from churches in Montreal and surrounding districts, Roland Lepage, 28, alias Fred Way, self-styled Communist, will serve the next seven years in St. Vincent de Paul penitentiary as the result of sentences imposed upon him in Police Court.

The accused objected to being charged with breaking and entering the churches, telling the court ‘that when the door is open and you walk in that is not breaking.’ The charges were amended to read plain theft and the accused pleaded guilty.

Lepage was given three five-year-terms by Judge Maurice Tetreau on three charges of theft, the three sentences to run concurrently. Brought before Judge Guerin, he was given two years on each of 21 charges of theft, the sentences to run concurrently but he will begin to serve these sentences only after he has completed the five-year term.

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“10 Years in Jail Escapee’s Price For 13 Free Days,” The Globe and Mail. October 8, 1948. Page 05.

In 13 days, David Cameron, 24, committed offences which netted him a prison term of 10 years. Magistrate Thomas Elmore sentenced Cameron yesterday for the latter’s armed robbery of a taxi-driver; breaking into a service station; attempted break-in of a second station; carrying an offensive weapon, and escaping from Burwash reformatory.

Cameron was given the 10-year-term for his robbery of taxi-driver John Kusian. Terms on the other charges against Cameron were made concurrent. The 10-year sentence will be consecutive to a three-months term the accused is now serving for a conviction registered in May.

Cameron escaped from Burwash Reformatory in September. The total sentence, which included the concurrent terms, amounted to 17 years.

‘You have had seven previous convictions before all this,’ His Worship told Cameron. ‘It is fortunate that no one has been injured.’

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“Prison Terms Are Meted Out,” Hamilton Spectator. October 8, 1938. Page 01.

Three Years For Costello, Two For MacAvella Imposed By Court

A
total of six years in prison terms was imposed on three men who
appeared before three men who appeared before Judge Ernest F. Lazier in
county criminal court Friday afternoon.

Frank Costello, aged 21,
one of a family of seven children, was sentenced to three years in
Kingston penitentiary when he pleaded guilty to four charges of theft of
automobiles.

Douglas MacAvella was sentenced to two years in
Kingston penitentiary when he was convicted of the theft if six auto
batteries from the Super-Lastic Sales corporation. He was acquitted of
the theft of an automobile.

Albert Peddie was given a one-year
term sentence for theft imposed in magistrate’s court, when Judge Lazler
convicted him of breaking into the garage of Robert McKee, Cannon street
and Sanford avenue, and the theft of electric drills and other tools
from it.

Appearing for Costello, Joseph D. Sullivan said he had a
‘heart to heart’ talk with him at the jail, but could only account for
his misdemeanours by his disposition toward recklessness.

‘I agree
with Mr. Sullivan that a reformatory term would have no effect in
redeeming him’ said George W. Ballard, K.C., crown attorney, handing
Costello’s record card to the judge.

Detective Albert Speakman
testified as to auto thefts in August and September when cars were stolen
belonging to James Ray, Grimsby Beach; Hertbert Ticker, Toronto; Harold
Jaggard, Cathcart street, and R. A. Bergdorf, York street.

Car Smashed
Mr. Tucker’s car was found near Dunnville badly smashed, Detective Speakman told the court.

Called
by the crown to testify in the MacAvella case, two young women and a
young man who were playing tennis on the courts of the First United
church, said they saw the accused carry batteries and place them in a
car on August 26. Judge Lazier found there was insufficient evidence to
justify his conviction for auto theft.

MacAvella denied theft of
the batteries, and added he had obligingly thrown back two tennis balls to
the young people who had testified against him.

In Peddie’s case,
Detective Speakman told of stopping the accused in his car, finding a
wrecking bar, hacksaw, tools and a large pair of snips. Robert McKee,
proprietor of a garage which was broken into, identified some of the
tools by his initials on them.

MacAvella and Peddie were without
counsel. Both had records. The convicted trio were led from the court
room, their hands manacled together.

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“Burglars Are Sent Down,” Toronto Globe. August 7, 1918. Page 02.

Brockville, Aug. 6 – (Special.) – Alfred Picard, Alfred Rogers and Napoleon Deladure Utayne of Montreal, convicted of burglarizing Doyle Bros.’ store at Prescott recently, were sentenced to-day to two years each in Kingston Penitentiary. A fourth man, Wilfred Pressau, was given a year in the Ontario Reformatory. The first three named had previous convictions.

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“Robbed Visitor, Goes to Prison,” Toronto Star. August 5, 1910. Page 10.

Nine Months for Edward Walsh – The Money Goes Back to His Victim

CASES IN THE POLICE COURT

George Empey Went Back to His Former Boarding House and Stole $42/
===
Because the bills found on Edward Walsh corresponded with those taken from Thomas White, a Californian, Walsh will go to the Central for nine months. It was some days ago that the charge was laid. White had been met at the station by two strangers, drinks followed, then he slept in a downtown hotel, and $245 disappeared from his pocket. The bills were on the First National Bank of Los Angles, and $150 of the same bank were found on Walsh by Detective Taylor. White gets the roll of $150.

Irene Britton, convicted as frequenter of a house of ill-fame, was fined ten dollars and costs.

Robbed Former Landlord.
Claiming that Grover Empey went back to his former boarding house, 188 Spadina avenue, entered during the night and stole $42, the proprietor, John Cansaul, pressed the charge against him in this morning’s Police Court.

‘Took it while I was sleeping,’ complained Cansaul, and the young man did not deny it.

He goes to the Central for four months, and any money found goes back to the owner.

Court Visitor Locked Up.
Herscharn Hertz, for many weeks a familiar figure about the court room as spectator, has been taken into custody, and will be examined by a doctor.

Ernest Carter was remanded a week on two charges of theft, $30 from A. E. Hockins, and a gold ring from Mrs. R. J. Moyes. To the theft of the former amount from his employer, the plea was guilty, but the boy’s mother was in court to press for leniency. 

They Were Acquitted.
‘He didn’t say anything to me about borrowing a few feeds of oats,’ said George Brennan, flatly contradicting the story of Ernest Amos, who was charged jointly with Charles Howard with the theft of a bag of eats from George Stevenson.

It was one to one on the evidence, for Howard had not heard the conversation. No records were against the two young men, so the charges were dismissed.

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“Got Five Years For Plundering Cottages,” Toronto Globe. July 25, 1912. Page 05.

Indian Found Guilty Of Theft From Grimsby Beach Residences.

(Special Despatch to The Globe.)
St. Catharines, July 24. – David Dockstader, an Indian, accused of entering J. D. Cran’s and J. B. Oliverson’s cottages at Grimsby Beach last December and stealing a large number of household articles, appeared before Judge Carman to-day. He was found guilty and sentenced to five years in Kingston Penitentiary. Mary Greene, a squaw, accused of a similar offence, was allowed to go.

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