Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘british palestine’

“British Soldiers Have Narrow Escape In Palestine,” Ottawa Citizen. November 5, 1938. Page 05.

A patrol of the 1st Battalion, Royal Scots, examining a crater in the road caused by a land mine which exploded just after a lorry had passed over it. The picture was taken near Nablus. – Official photograph, by air from Palestine to London.

Read Full Post »

“Jews Mourn Arab Victims,” The Globe and Mail. October 24, 1938. Page 02.

His arms upraised in supplication and flanked by sorrowing Jews clad in the typical farmer’s garb for their new land, this rabbi is conducting funeral services for a score of Jews, mostly women and children, who were slain in Tiberias, Palestine. Oct. 18 saw the establishment of British martial law in an effort to bring peace to the land of the Prince of Peace.

Read Full Post »

“A L’ABRI DES BALLES ARABES,” Le Soleil. October 21, 1938. Page 01.

Cinq policiers juifs, qui s’étaient réfugiés dans cette voiture blindée, ont pu tenir tête pendant une heure a
80 Arabes venus les attaquer. Les Juifs continuent de s’armer le mieux possible, car la guerre en Palestine prend
chaque jour de plus grandes proportions. La loi martiale est maintenant appliquée dans plusieurs villes de la
Terre-Sainte, et les Anglais font des efforts désespérés pour rétablir I ordre. 

Read Full Post »

“Farmers Almost Must Be Fighters In The Holy Land,” Ottawa Citizen. August 10, 1938. Page 01.

The day foreseen by the Hebrew prophet when his people would beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks, has not yet come. Here are depicted Jewish farmers in the Holy Land who today have to till and reap their fields with the implements of peace at the same time as they have to guard their lives with the implements of war. They are going to their day’s work with farm tools and rifles, prepared to defend themselves against attack from Arabs.

Read Full Post »

“Jews on Guard In Strife-Ridden Palestine,” Ottawa Citizen. August 5, 1938. Page 05.

In Palestine, where as a result of the growing strife every Jew suspects every Arab and every Arab suspects every Jew, the dramatic episode shown above was recorded by the camera. Out of the black desert night, a robed Arab approached the barbed-wire barrier which guards a Jewish settlement near Jerusalem. Two armed Jewish sentinels promptly placed their rifles in a position to shoot, while a third questioned the Arab. After a long cross-examination and a search, the Arab was finally permitted to enter the senttlement to get medical attention from a Jewish doctor there.

Read Full Post »

“Arabs Smash Fence Along The Palestine-Syria Border,” Ottawa Citizen. July 26, 1938. Page 14.

Damage estimated at $50,000 was caused to the Palestine-Syria border wall when Arab gangs swept down a Jewish community recently, also taking a heavy toll of lives. Roads were blown up and in one locality villagers were forced to aid in the destruction of the wall. Photo shows the havoc wrought, the huge boulders making the work of reconstruction more difficult. Workers can be seen repairing the fence, known as ‘Tegar’s Wall.’

Read Full Post »

“British Police Count Holy Land Dead,” Ottawa Citizen. July 25, 1938. Page 03.

With the Holy Land in the grip of a new outbreak of Jew-Arab clashes, tension reached a high point when a bomb exploded in a crowded marketplace in Jerusalem, killing fifteen Arabs and wounding forty-two others. In the photo above, British police and members of the Black Watch, rushed to Palestine to preserve order, remove the bodies of the victims.

Read Full Post »

“An Eye For An Eye,” Toronto Star. July 23, 1938. Page 21.

“Recent disorders in Palestine have been marked by Jewish terrorists. This border fence was ruined by Araba in the inter-racial fighting.

Read Full Post »

“Palestine Advance Guard,” Montreal Gazette. August 5, 1938. Page 26.

“An armored trolley proceedes a troop train over the railroad leading into Haifa, as units of the Eleventh Hussars arrive to join other forces dispatched by the British authorities after an outburst of bombing, sniping and arson in the area.”

Read Full Post »

“The period of 1940 to 1946 witnessed unprecedented solidarity between Arab and Jewish workers, not only among the railwaymen but in many other mixed enterprises as well. This may seem ironic in retrospect, since by the end of 1947 Palestine was engulfed in a full-scale civil war. But during the Second World War and immediately after it, a short-lived conjuncture created new possibilities for militant joint action, though they were eventually eclipsed by escalating political tensions.

The Palestinian working class, Arab and Jewish, expanded very dramatically during the war. Disruption of the usual sources of supply stimulated development of the country’s industrial base, as did the demand created by the enormously swollen British and Allied military presence. Military bases and related service enterprises proliferated, drawing tens of thousands of Arab peasants and townspeople into wage labor at work sites which also employed Jews.

[…]

Labor shortages in many sectors strengthened the workers’ bargaining position, while high inflation pushes them toward action. […] In these circumstances there ensued an unprecedented wave of unionization and militancy which affected Arab workers most dramatically because they had hitherto been less active and less organized. [redmensch: This is mostly because the Jews had been strongly influenced by working-class politics in the European diaspora already.] […] This upsurge was encouraged by, and in turn benefited, newly reinvigorated left-wing forces in both the Arab community and the Yishuv which implicitly challenged nationalist leaderships on both sides by advocating class solidarity and political compromise between Arabs and Jews.

During the war a new Arab left emerged in Palestine, organized in the communist-led National Liberation League (’Usbat al-Taharrur al-Watani’, NLL). […] In the Yishuv, the initially kibbutz-based socialist-Zionist Hashomer Hatza’ir (Young Guard) movement, which advocated a bi-national Palestine and Arab-Jewish class solidarity and was trying to extend its influence among Jewish urban workers … and it won significant support among militant Jewish workers, including railway workers in what had become known as Red Haifa. The Jewish communist movement also resurfaced during and after the war. […] It now sought to gain legitimacy and support from the wartime popularity of the Soviet Union, whose Red Army the Yishuv hailed as the main force fighting the Nazis, and by trying to ride of the wave of worker activism.

[…]

A series of job actions and short strikes culminated … in a three-day occupation of the Haifa workshops in February 1944. Unrest continued after the end of the war in Europe, manifested during 1945 in a number of brief wildcat strikes by railway and postal workers, now among the most militant and experienced (and of course most integrated) segments of the Palestinian working class. The NLL’s newspaper, al-Ittihad, hailed these incidents as “clear proof of the possibility of joint action in every workplace,” provided that the workers steered clear of interference by both Zionism and “Arab reaction.”

The Arab communists’ prescription seemed to find confirmation in April 1946 when a planned strike by Jewish and Arab postal workers in Tel Aviv spontaneously expanded to encompass some 13,000 Arab and Jewish postal, telegraph, railway, port and public workers department workers, along with 10,000 lower- and middle-level white-collar government employees. This general strike paralyzed the British colonial administration and won the support of much of Jewish and Arab public opinion. The Arab and Jewish communists naturally saw in it a wonderful manifestation of class solidarity, “a blow against the ‘divide and rule’ policy of imperialism, a slap in the face of those who chauvinist ideologies and propagate national division,” but warned the strikes against “defeatist and reactionary elements, Arab and Jewish.”

[…]

The strikers ultimately won many of their demands, and … the following year witnessed the rapid growth of unions and the spread of worker activism, especially in the army camps and at the oil refinery and the Iraq Petroleum Company’s pipeline terminal in Haifa. In these workplaces Arab and Jewish workers often cooperated in pursuit of higher wages and better conditions.”

– Zachary Lockman, “Railway workers and relational history: Arabs and Jews in British-ruled Palestine.” Comparative Studies in Society and History, Volume 35, Issue 3, July 1993. pp. 601-627

Read Full Post »