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Posts Tagged ‘conscription in canada’

“Sinn Feiner Gets 15 Years In Prison,” Toronto Globe. September 28, 1918. Page 07.

J. E. Plant’s Sentence Of Death Is Commuted – ‘Conchy’ Given 10 Years.

(Canadian Press Despatch.)
Niagara Camp, Sept. 27. – The first drafted man in camp to be sentenced to death by the general court-martial is John Edward Plant of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Central Ontario Regiment, whose sentence was promulgated this afternoon at a garrison parade. His sentence, however, has been commuted to fifteen years’ imprisonment in the penitentiary at Kingston, and this was read at the promulgation by Captain Roy Parke, Adjutant of the 2nd Battaltion, 2nd C.O.R. Plant is a Sinn Feiner, and refused to perform military service in any capacity.

Johnston Marks of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd C.O.R., who is a conscientious objector and refused to put on uniform, was sentenced to penitentiary for ten years.

Col. K. I. McLaren, Camp Commandant, was in charge of the parade for the promulgation of the sentences.

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“No Jury For The Inquest Being Held Today,” Sudbury Star. August 21, 1918. Page 03.

Witnessses to Tell Story of the Shooting of Defaulter.

The inquest into the death of Cyprien Gareau, the Blezard Valley defaulter shot by Dominion Officer Tougher at a farm house last Saturday morning, is taking place this afternoon before Coroner Dr. W. R. Patterson, without a jury. The body has been at Henry’s morgue since last Saturday.

SHOT AT UNDERTAKERS.
Undertakers who went to the farm house at Blezard last Saturday afternoon report having been shot at from the bush, near the house, several times, while several automobiles have also reported that they have heard bullets whiz by in the same locality. While the police do not place much credence on the reports of shooting, which they attribute more or less to imagination, the undertakers are emphatic they heard the reports of the rifles and the whiz of the bullets close to their rig. It was while returning with the body that the shooting incident occurred.

OFFICERS GIVEN SAFE CONDUCT
In direct contrast to the visit of the undertakers is that on Monday afternoon o provincial officers headed by Inspector Storie. The inspector reports he drove purposely past the spot from which the shots were supposed to come, and all was peace and quiet. This may be accounted for, however, by the fact that a brother of one of the defaulters who is at large was in the vehicle with the officer.

There seems to be no doubt but what there was shooting. The undertakers say they met several soldiers, belonging to the district and home on harvest leave. The soldiers took to the bush as soon as the firing started. They later emerged with their tunics under their arms.

STORIES VARY SOMEWHAT
Visits to the scene of the shooting were paid by Inspector Storie on Monday and again on Tuesday. An investigation was conducted and witnesses subpoenaed for the inquest. The Inspector found that the stories of the Dominion Police and that of the relatives of the deceased man tally up fairly well, except that there is a difference of opinion as to who fired the first shot. Those at the farm house say the officers fired first, but this is not borne out by the investigation. 

FOUR BULLET MARKS
There are four bullet marks inside the house. These bear out the story of the Dominion officers that the first shot, from which Officer Tougher bears powder marks on his face, passed through the roof of the lean-to of the house, where the deceased man was located when Tougher pulled back the curtain. The bullet mark is in the roof. There is also a bullet hole in the front door, which tallies up with the police story that a shot was fired through the closed door at the officers as they were retiring from the house. The next shot was apparently fired by Tougher after the door had been re-opened. This shot passed through the body of the dead man, who was apparently standing in the door of the bedroom, hit a knob on the bedpost and careened off into the wall. There is also a shot in the window sill, also fired from the inside, which so far has not been connected up with the story, unless it was fired to scare the officers away.

MAY GIVE HIMSELF UP
Hopes are held out that a younger Gareau, brother of deceased, also a defaulter, will give himself up before the inquest. Relatives have given the police assurance that they will advise the young man to take this course, and it was hoped that he would surrender on Monday, but the plan did not materialize. The authorities were given assurance that he would be produced before August 24th, the last day of pardon extended by the Minister of Justice.

Crown Attorney Miller is acting for the Crown at the inquest and Mr. B. Boutet for the family of the deceased. Mr. Boutet has also paid a visit to the scene of the shooting.

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“Defaulter Dead In Clash With Military Police,” Sudbury Star. August 17, 1918. Page 01.

Officers Were Targets of Fusilade of Rifle Firing.

Cyprien Gareau, aged 28, Blezard township, a defaulter under the Military Service Act, is dead from gun shot wounds received in a Dominion police search for defaulters last night. The shooting occurred at the hom of the deceased, a mile and a half from Blezard postoffice, about 3.30 this (Saturday) morning. Coroner Dr. W. R. Patterson was called by the Dominion police to attend the wounded man and found him dead. An inquest with a jury will be held Monday. Officer Tougher, who shot Gareau, surrendered himself this morning before Magistrate Brodie and has been released on $2,000 bail bonds.

With five Dominion police officers Inspector Tolmie left Sudbury last night, acting on information as to the whereabouts of a number of defaulters in Blezard township. The Gareau home was the third farmhouse the police had visited, the search of the other two having been fruitless. It was about 3.30 this morning when the Gareau home was reached. Inspector Tolmie, with two officers, was in the house examining the papers of two men, when one of the officers stepped over to a curtain which partitioned the room, in search of any other male residents of the household. As the officer threw back the curtain he was fired at point blank by a man sitting on a bed behind the curtain, only a few feet away, holding a rifle. The officers backed away and emerged from the house amid more rifle firing from inside the house. Officer Tougher responded with one shot from outside the house through the door, with the fatal effect. There are two Gareau boys defaulters under the M.S.A.  The other brother was in the house at the time, but escaped.

The Dominion police squad were not all armed, not anticipating trouble. After the affray Inspector Tolmie left three of his men on the Gareay farm as guard and came to Sudbury for rifles and ammunition, returning about 6 a.m. Throughout the night there was some firing from the bush and when the squad left the scene at about six o’clock this morning their departing automobile was subjected to a fusilade of rifle shots from the woods.

It was not until seven o’clock this morning, when a truce was declared and the officers re-entered the house, that they knew the tragedy has occurred. No outcry was made and as soon as young Gareau’s condition was learned the officers immediately summoned medical attention.

The most positive definance of the Military Service Act is evident throughout the Blezard Valley section, Inspector Tolmie informed The Star today. There are over forty defaulters and deserters listed in the district and there is not a day that some incident is not reported of lawlessness that is credited to the defaulters, including the theft of calves, sheep and fowl, and store burglarlies alleged to be committed by them in search of food for the several hiding places. The defaulters have shown nothing but contempt for the recent amnesty extended by the Minister of Justice. Word has been sent by friends to every one of the forty names posted, and there has been only one response to the offer of pardon.

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“More Objectors Placed On Trial,” Toronto Globe. August 1, 1918. Page 10.

Three Men Before the General Court-martial at Niagara Camp

One A Sinn Feiner

Another an Austrian Who Is Ready to Do Service at Home

(Canadian Press Despatch.)
Niagara Camp, July 31. – A general court-martial was held here this morning, when Lieut.-Col. A. J. McCausland, of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd C.O.R., presided at the trial of two men, Sherman S. Babcok and Joseph Toorish of the 1st Battalion, 2nd C.O.R. Lieut.-Col. G. L. Francis of the Railway Troops Depot presided at the trial of a third man, Paul Joseph Forst of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd C.O.R. in place of Col. McCausland, as Forst is a member of Col. McCausland’s battalion. The other members of the court sat throughout the trial of the three accused, and were: Major F. P. Myles, Major A. A. McKenzie, Capt. W. R. S. Richardson, Capt. L. H. Bertram and Lieut.-Col. J. A. MacDonald, Judge Advocate. The prosecutors were Major S. H. Bastick and Major C. P. Mackenzie.

Babcock and Forst are conscientious objectors, and Toorish is a Sinn Feiner who was charged with having ‘willfully defied authority’ by refusing to put on the King’s uniform, and having declared that he would not fight for the British, who had killed his people in the Sinn Fein rebellion in Dublin in 1916.

Reads Statement of Views.
Toorish is a big fellow, of good education, a native of Dublin, a confessed Sinn Feiner and an office clerk. He had written a lengthy statement of his views on the question of Great Britain’s treatment of Ireland and the people of the south of Ireland, and his reasons for refusing to don the Khaki in behalf of the British and the other allies. This statement he was permitted to read, and it was put in as evidence in his defece. He said: ‘If the British Government had put Herbert Asquith’s Home Rule Bill into effect, Ireland would not be in her present position of antagonism to the British. The Sinn Fein rebellion in Dublin in 1916 was the direct outcome, and I believe the rebellion was justified.’

Toorish feelingly referred to a lady who was very dear to him, and whose life was to have been linked to his, whose death he said was due to British bullets. ‘The cause she died for,’ he said, ‘is a good enough cause for me to die for too.’

Casement and Carson.
Toorish cited the difference in the treatment of Sir Roger Casement and Sir Edward Carson, the first named ‘a loyal Irish gentleman,’ having been shot in the Tower of London, and Carson admitted to the British Cabinet, though both men were in the same boat, so far as their connection with the Germans had been concerned. Toorish positively refused to recede from his position of opposition to the British Government, and expressed himself ready to be ‘sacrificed’ for his opinions.

Disclaims Pro-German Sympathy.
Toorish is a native of Strabane, County Tyrone, Ireland, and before coming to Canada nine years ago was a student at Dublin University. He has resided in Toronto several years. He was candid enough to admit that his sympathies were not with the British in this war, though two of his brothers were fighting with the British. However, he would not admit being a pro-German. He was loyal to Ireland, he said, and he was a Sinn Feiner.

John Doughtery, 425 Annette street, Toronto, and Daniel Roughan, 98 1/3 Bellwoods avenue, Toronto, both natives of Ireland, gave character evidence on Toorish’s behalf.

Professes Conscientious Objector.
Sherman S. Babcock pleaded guilty to the charge of having refused to put on the uniform. ‘I am a child of God,’ he said in his defence, ‘and I feel that it is against the Lord’s will that I should kill anybody.’ He declared that he would not obey the Military Law, and would take what punishment was in store for him as a result of his stand.

Babcock is 22 years of age, and a harnessmaker by trade. He said he did not belong to any sect whose tenets forbade him performing military service.

Objector, Not an Enemy.
Paul Joseph Forst, an Austrian, who was naturalized, had refused to put on the uniform, and claimed that it was because of his religious belief that he would not take part in military affairs, not because of his Austrian origin. He professed to be willing to do work for the military cause, but said he would not wear the uniform. He based his religious belief on books published by the Ecteric Society in California, he said.

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“Trunk Caused Suspicion At C.P.R. Station,” Sudbury Star. July 31, 1918. Page 05.

Found to Contain High Wines – Other Police Court News.

A suspicious looking trunk in the baggae room of the C.P.R. was the object of an all-day vigil by Provincial Officer Grassick on Friday last. The officer was awaiting the arrival of the owner, and when he failed to appear, the trunk was removed by License Inspector Kilpatrick and upon examination was found to contain six gallons of high wines. The trunk came from Montreal. Alex. Brunet, carter, Saturday evening appeared at the baggage room with a check for the trunk and as a consequence was summoned to police court Monday morning to tell what he knew of the affair.

COURT WAS SKEPTICAL
A rather hazy story was told by Brunet Monday morning the court was skeptical as to its truthfulness. A lady had met him in front of the Queen`s Hotel, he said, nad handed him a baggae check to get the trunk at the station. She was sitting in a rig at the time and Brunet was unable to give her name or description. At the station he was told that the trunk was being held by the authorities and that the lady would have to come herself. According to his own story Brunet went back and reported to the lady that the trunk was too heavy for him to handle, at the same time returning the check. The lady, of course, never called for the trunk.

In giving Brunet the benefit of the doubt the magistrate commented on the fact that it was almost unbelievable that a woman with a vehicle should ask a carter to go to the station for a trunk, and frankly told Brunet that he (Brunet) knew more of the circumstances than he had told. His Worship issued a warning that the next offence would not be dealt with so lenitently.

PASSED STANDING STREET CAR
John Lahti had sold his Studebaker car but the transfer had not yet been approved of by the department, and although he had disposed of the car he was held responsible for driving past a standing street car on the Copper Cliff road. The case was called Saturday and laid over until Monday to allow Lahti to get hold of the real offender, John Ajola, who pleaded guilty. A fine of 41 and costs was levied.

MANY WITHOUT PAPERS
The Dominion police continue the good work of rounding up defaulters and aliens without papers. Scarely a morning passes but what a half dozen or more appear.

Monday morning the aged parents of George Chalotte appeared in court with their son, who was in the custody of the Dominion police. Chalotte’s exemption expired June 1st and he has since failed to report. The magistrate had no alternative but turn him over to the military, despite his pleadings that he was the only support of his parents. The aged mother sobbed bitterly as he was taken away, despite the comforting words of the magistrate, who explained that they should be proud that their son was going to be a soldier, and that they would receive as much or more financial support from the Government as they had previously received from their son.

Wm. Babcock and Norris H. Soucie were also handed over to the military authorities as defaulters.

TEACHING A LESSON
Magistrate Brodie Monday morning made good his threat, repeated several times in the past few weeks, that an example would be made of aliens who failed to carry their papers, when he fined John Lozoscrack $5 and costs. Excuses no longer will suffice.

Four Italians appeared charged with failing to carry papers.

‘How do I know you are Italians?’ asked the magsitrate. ‘You might be British subjects for all I know. I will give you twenty-four hors to get the proper papers.’

FARMER FINED $300
Abraham Jackson, a farmer of the Kelly Lake district, Saturday morning, was fined $300 and costs for having liquor in a place other than a private dwelling. In addition he drew done a fine $10 and costs for disorderly conduct in the house of a neighbouring farmer, A. Israelson.

MOTORISTS ARRAIGNED
Four local motorists, Dr. W. J. Cook, W. J. LaForest, David Lawila and Simon Maloney, were arraigned Tuesday morning, charged with passing a standing street car while passengers were alighting, at the post officer corner on the evening of July 26. The motorists pleded not guilty and while Magistrtae Brodie commented that the practice was becoming too common, his Worship pointed out, however, that the car stands at the post office corner some time at various intervals and considered the motorists should take the matter up with the council and have the regulation rectified. The case was remanded till called.

J. M. Balmforth, of Copper Cliff, who exceeded the speed limit on the Copper Cliff road on July 18th, was assessed $10 and costs.

Roy McLaughlin, Creighton Mine, drove his car after dark without proper lights on Monday night and was fined $5 and costs.

GOES TO TORONTO
Sam Penfold, who hails from Creighton Mine and claims Russia as his native land, was sent to Toronto on Tuesday, where he will be placed in the army until such time as he proves his age.

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“Demands to be Sent to Internment Camp,” Toronto Globe. July 5, 1918. Page 02.

(Special Despatch to The Globe)
Windsor, July 4. – Shouting that he would never pay his fine and demanding that he be sent to an internment camp, Rudolph Schmidt, aged 50 years, a German who has been farming in Maldstone township since August 1914 was to-day ordered by Magistrate Miers to pay a fine of $125 and costs and to serve a month in jail. The sentence was the maximum provided by law.

Schmidt was arrested by Provincial officers a week ago for having failed to register. When taken into custody he gave the officers a hard fight before he could be handcuffed. Neighbors say that Schmidt is wealthy, and that he is professedly pro-German. A thorough search will be made of his farm premises at once.

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“Do Young Finns Destroy Papers To Evade M.S.A.?” Sudbury Star. May 4, 1918. Page 05.

Canadian Naturalization Papers Rare in This District.

It is the general belief in official circles here that many young men of foreign birth, other than aliens, have destroyed their Canadian naturalization papers to evade military service. Since the advent of conscription the experience of the police has been that a naturalization paper is a very rare thing, and a raid on Finland Hall, Copper Cliff, Wednesday evening, only served to strengthen the belief already held. None of the young men of military age questioned by the police had naturalization papers, despite the fact that hundreds were taken out in this district prior to the war.

The raid was made by the Dominion police, assisted by some members of the municipal and company force. A show was in progress when the police entered at 9.40 and the appearance of the officers caused so much consternation that the performance was abruptly stopped. Every male in the hall was questioned while all exits were guarded. Nine young men who had no papers whatever were taken into custody. In police court they were fined $1 and costs each for a contravention of section 16 of the M.S.A. in not having the necessary papers to assure their identity. Meanwhile the men who were fined have secured affidavits as to their nationality.

A Real Haymaker.
Nora Laroche, a Creighton woman of middle age and hefty proportions, handed K.

Acquino

, her landlord, a regular ‘haymaker’ the other day following an argument. The blow, or blows, were reinforced by a drinking glass and it required five stitches to repair Acquino. Nora wanted to have a dance in her apartment, but the landlord refused, saying the floor was unsafe. This started the fracas. She was fined $10 and costs.

He Stole Liquor.
The eagle eye of Mrs. A. Delavadova, of Creighton Mine, even at 2 a.m. in the morning, detected a shadow near the chicken coup and this was where the liquor was kept ‘to keep it out of sight of the children.’ The mysterious form moved stealthily, entered the chicken coup, placed 34 bottles in a bag and departed. He was followed, however, and seen to plant his feet under soome camouflage. Next morning, however, a search revealed only nine bottles, while three empties were found at Enrico’s house. He was sentenced to three months at Burwash.

Expensive Drinks
Three of the young Finlanders taken in the raid on Finland Hall Wednesday evening were intoxicated. They admitted drinking liquor in a public place and each paid a fine of $200 and costs.

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