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“Garson Farmer Faces Charge Of Harboring,” Sudbury Star. August 21, 1918. Page 03.

Dominion Police State Edward Martell Is Hiding Cousin.

The first charge of harboring a deserter to be laid by the Dominion Police at Sudbury was read in Monday morning’s police court, against Edward Martell, Garson township. He is charged with harboring John Martell, his cousin, a deserter from the C.E.F. The case was adjourned until Saturday morning next. It is understood that the court is prepared to take a lenient view of the case providing that in the meantime Pte. Martell, the deserter, is delivered to the military. B. Boutet appeared for accused Monday morning and entered a plea of not guilty.

While this is the first charge of harboring to be instituted by the Dominion Police, there have been many instances where prosecution could have been started for harboring, aiding and abetting. Flagrant cases have been known to the police, in which the mothers of the offenders have played important parts and it was mainly for this reason that no action was taken.

MORE SHOOTING
More shooting is reported from Garson township in addition to that which took place and is daily taking place in Blezard township. The Dominion police last Thursday went out to the Edward Martell farm in Garson township and while making enquiries at the farm house were shot at by some one, presumably John Martell, the deserter, who was concealed in the barn. He later made good his escape to the bush and is still at large.

BOOZE BURIED IN GROUND
The Ontario Temperance Act is no respecter of persons. It may happen that Luigi Augustini, hard working man and the father of five young children, one of whom is very sick, may have to go to jail for three months. There is, however, another side to the story, that of Chief Brown, of the municipal police.

The hardship plea failed to move the court Monday morning when Augustini was fined $300 and costs. A few days ago one Koski, up on a drunk charge, disclosed the source of his supply, a case being later found buried beside the Augustini residence. The plea that some one else had buried the case beside the house was also put forth, the possibilities of which were dwelt upon eloquently and at some length by Mr. J. A. Mulligan, counsel for accused. Magistrate Brodie also turned a deaf ear to this plea.

But all’s well that ends well, and there is a chance now that kind friends will come to the rescue of the poor, hard-working Augustini and pay his fine, the authorities having agreed to a recess until Saturday next.

THREE MEN AND A GIRL
A pretty, young French-Canadian girl of eighteen summers, Cecile Gatien, who originally hails from Montreal and has been in these parts but two weeks, was found in a house Saturday night with three Austrians. Provincial Constable Grassick was out that way on another mission Saturday night last when three autos in front of the house attracted his attention. All lights had been darkened on the autos and he was unable to secure numbers as they scurried away. There is a suspicion that they were licensed jitneys. Several complaints about the house have been made to the police.

Two of the men came from Murray Mine and for that reason the charge of leaving their place of residence without the permission of the police failed. The magistrate held that as there was no registrar at Murray Mine, and as Stobie and Murray are in the same municipality, this charge could not succeed. The third young foreigner, however, come from Garson, which made $10 and costs difference.

On a charge of being frequenters of a house of ill fame and three men pleaded guilty and paid $10 and costs.

The young girl pleaded guilty to being a keeper, her counsel asking a week’s remand, which was granted. She has a lover, a young Italian, it is understood, who is willing to go to the altar with the erring girl, and in case the marriage materializes the leniency of the court for a chance to make good will be asked.

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“It is at the same time that the State apparatus appropriates
the war machine, subordinates it to its “political” aims, and gives it
war as its direct object.  And  it is one and  the same historical
tendency
that causes State to evolve from a triple point of view: going from
figures of encastment to forms of appropriation proper, going from
limited war to so-called total war, and transforming the relation
between aim and object. The factors that make State war total war are
closely connected to capitalism: it has to do with the investment of
constant capital in equipment, industry, and the war economy, and the
investment of variable capital in the population in its physical and
mental aspects (both as warmaker and as victim of war). Total war is
not only a war of annihilation but arises when annihilation takes as its
“center” not only the enemy army, or the enemy State, but the entire
population and its economy. The fact  that this double investment can be
made only under prior conditions of limited war  illustrates the
irresistible  character of the capitalist tendency to develop total
war.

We could say that the appropriation has changed
direction, or rather that States tend to unleash, reconstitute, an
immense war machine of which they are no longer anything more than the
opposable or apposed parts. This worldwide war machine, which in away
“reissues” from the States, displays two successive figures: first, that
of fascism, which makes war an unlimited movement with no other aim
than itself; but fascism is only a rough sketch, and the second,
post-fascist, figure is that of a war machine that takes peace as its
object directly, as the peace of Terror or Survival. The war machine
reforms a smooth space that now claims to control, to surround the
entire earth. Total war itself is surpassed, toward a form of peace
more terrifying still. The war machine has taken charge of the aim,
worldwide order, and the States are now no more than objects or means
adapted to that  machine. This is the point at which Clausewitz’s
formula is effectively reversed; to be entitled to say that politics is
the continuation of war by other means, it is not enough to invert the
order of the words as if they could be spoken in either direction; it is
necessary to follow the real movement at the conclusion of which the
States, having appropriated a war machine, and having adapted it to
their aims, reimpart a war machine that  takes charge  of the aim,
appropriates the States, and assumes increasingly wider political
functions.

Doubtless, the present situation is highly discouraging. We have
watched the war machine grow stronger and stronger, as in a science
fiction story; we have seen it assign as its objective a peace still
more terrifying than fascist death; we have seen it maintain or
instigate the most terrible of local wars as parts of itself; we have
seen it set its  sights on a new type of enemy, no longer another State,
or even another regime, but the  "unspecified enemy"; we have seen it
put its counterguerrilla elements into place, so that it can be caught
by surprise once, but not twice. Yet the very conditions that make the
State or World war machine possible,  in other words, constant capital
(resources and equipment) and human variable capital, continually
recreate unexpected possibilities for counterattack, unforeseen
initiatives determining revolutionary, popular, minority, mutant
machines. The definition of the Unspecified Enemy testifies to this:
“multiform, maneuvering and omnipresent… of the moral, political,
subversive or economic  order, etc.,” the unassignable material Saboteur
or human Deserter assuming the most diverse forms.”

– Gilles Deleuze & Felix Guattari, “1227: TREATISE ON NOMADOLOGY—THE WAR MACHINE” in A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism & Schizophrenia. Translated by Brian Massumi. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1987. pp. 420-422

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