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Posts Tagged ‘direct action’

“A decade-long access to information fight by Amnesty International has uncovered documents the organization says reveal a deep-seated bias in how the Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) handled the Mohawks land dispute in 2008.

“From the very beginning we think the response to the land occupation and protests in Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory were vastly disproportional to any credible evidence of any threat to public safety,” said Craig Benjamin, who works for the human rights organization.

“Do I really think the OPP are there for public safety? Absolutely not,” said Dan Doreen, a Mohawk land defender, who was on the frontlines of the land reclamation in Tyendinaga.

“Does public safety encompass Indigenous people? Absolutely not.”

Larry Hay is a Mohawk investigator based in Tyendinaga. He worked with Amnesty International to examine the OPP actions.

He said this is still very much a live issue for his community.

“Why is it important ten years on to move this forward? Because these issues have never been addressed,” said Hay.

Hay is a former RCMP officer and former chief of the Tyendinaga Mohawk Police.

“What happened here in 2008, here Tyendinaga at the Culbertson Tract turned out to be an example for police of how not to manage an Indigenous protest,” said Hay.

The Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory, in southeastern Ontario, sits on the shores of the Bay of Quinte, framed by Highway 401, the train tracks to the north and two small towns on either side.

In 1995, the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte filed a land claim for a 900 acre (364 hectares) area called the Culbertson Tract. Roughly a third of it is farmland, but it also includes part of the small town of Deseronto, which borders the reserve.

“All the important part of the town is on stolen land,” said Doreen.

The land claim is still under negotiation.

Back in 2007, the Mohawks had already protested a permit granted by the province to a local developer for a quarry in the land claim area.

They occupied the quarry site and shut it down.

That occupation was still going on a year later, when another property developer announced plans for 200 housing units in Deseronto, in another area that’s part of the land claim.

“It was always about the land and it was stopping development of the land,” said Doreen. “And we did that.”

The 2008 protests and police actions largely happened out of the public eye.

But through freedom of information, Amnesty International has accessed documents including officer’s notes, briefing books, police interviews, and footage recorded by the OPP – video never before seen by the public.

“Do you need 200 police officers to address a situation which is at most one of mischief? Or perhaps one where no laws are being broken?” asked Benjamin.

The OPP deployed the Public Order unit, the Canine unit, a helicopter and the Tactics and Rescue Unit (TRU), commonly called the sniper squad or swat team.”

– Trina Roache, “Documents show deep-seated bias by police during operations against Mohawks of Tyendinaga.” APTN Investigates, November 23, 2018.

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huggablekaiju:

historium:

“Let them die in the streets” USA, 1990

This is a Gran Fury piece for ACT-UP. Landlords were evicting AIDS victims (and had been for years.) There were no legal protections to stop this, and AIDS was such a great stigma that these people were largely being erased.

ACT-UP installed an enamel sign in Petrosino Square, NYC.

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“The office of Ontario’s Labour Minister was vandalized on Tuesday night shortly after Doug Ford’s Conservative government announced it would repeal a number of labour reforms, including a planned increase to the minimum wage.

Photos supplied to VICE by the premier’s office show several broken windows and flipped furniture strewn about Laurie Scott’s office in Kawartha Lakes. In addition to the damage, a spraypainted message was left on the wall, reading “Attack Workers We Fight Back $15.””

– Mack Lamoureux, “Ontario’s Labour Minister’s Office Vandalized After Doug Ford Rolls Back Workers’ Rights.” VICE News, October 24.

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“Communist Jailed As Church Robber,” Montreal Gazette. October 18, 1938. Page 10. 

R. Lepage Gets Seven Years After Pleading Guilty to Over 20 Charges

Pleading guilty yesterday to more than 20 charges of theft from churches in Montreal and surrounding districts, Roland Lepage, 28, alias Fred Way, self-styled Communist, will serve the next seven years in St. Vincent de Paul penitentiary as the result of sentences imposed upon him in Police Court.

The accused objected to being charged with breaking and entering the churches, telling the court ‘that when the door is open and you walk in that is not breaking.’ The charges were amended to read plain theft and the accused pleaded guilty.

Lepage was given three five-year-terms by Judge Maurice Tetreau on three charges of theft, the three sentences to run concurrently. Brought before Judge Guerin, he was given two years on each of 21 charges of theft, the sentences to run concurrently but he will begin to serve these sentences only after he has completed the five-year term.

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fuckyeahanarchistposters:

For A Society Without Prisons

In 1993, the guerilla group the Red Army Faction bombed the
construction site of a new super maximum security prison in Weiterstadt,
Germany. Over $90 million in damage was caused, the opening of the
prison was delayed by four years, and no one was seriously injured. This was the final action of the RAF before disbanding.

“For a society without prisons!”—Commando Katharina Hammerschmidt, Red Army Faction, March 30, 1993

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