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“No Jury For The Inquest Being Held Today,” Sudbury Star. August 21, 1918. Page 03.

Witnessses to Tell Story of the Shooting of Defaulter.

The inquest into the death of Cyprien Gareau, the Blezard Valley defaulter shot by Dominion Officer Tougher at a farm house last Saturday morning, is taking place this afternoon before Coroner Dr. W. R. Patterson, without a jury. The body has been at Henry’s morgue since last Saturday.

SHOT AT UNDERTAKERS.
Undertakers who went to the farm house at Blezard last Saturday afternoon report having been shot at from the bush, near the house, several times, while several automobiles have also reported that they have heard bullets whiz by in the same locality. While the police do not place much credence on the reports of shooting, which they attribute more or less to imagination, the undertakers are emphatic they heard the reports of the rifles and the whiz of the bullets close to their rig. It was while returning with the body that the shooting incident occurred.

OFFICERS GIVEN SAFE CONDUCT
In direct contrast to the visit of the undertakers is that on Monday afternoon o provincial officers headed by Inspector Storie. The inspector reports he drove purposely past the spot from which the shots were supposed to come, and all was peace and quiet. This may be accounted for, however, by the fact that a brother of one of the defaulters who is at large was in the vehicle with the officer.

There seems to be no doubt but what there was shooting. The undertakers say they met several soldiers, belonging to the district and home on harvest leave. The soldiers took to the bush as soon as the firing started. They later emerged with their tunics under their arms.

STORIES VARY SOMEWHAT
Visits to the scene of the shooting were paid by Inspector Storie on Monday and again on Tuesday. An investigation was conducted and witnesses subpoenaed for the inquest. The Inspector found that the stories of the Dominion Police and that of the relatives of the deceased man tally up fairly well, except that there is a difference of opinion as to who fired the first shot. Those at the farm house say the officers fired first, but this is not borne out by the investigation. 

FOUR BULLET MARKS
There are four bullet marks inside the house. These bear out the story of the Dominion officers that the first shot, from which Officer Tougher bears powder marks on his face, passed through the roof of the lean-to of the house, where the deceased man was located when Tougher pulled back the curtain. The bullet mark is in the roof. There is also a bullet hole in the front door, which tallies up with the police story that a shot was fired through the closed door at the officers as they were retiring from the house. The next shot was apparently fired by Tougher after the door had been re-opened. This shot passed through the body of the dead man, who was apparently standing in the door of the bedroom, hit a knob on the bedpost and careened off into the wall. There is also a shot in the window sill, also fired from the inside, which so far has not been connected up with the story, unless it was fired to scare the officers away.

MAY GIVE HIMSELF UP
Hopes are held out that a younger Gareau, brother of deceased, also a defaulter, will give himself up before the inquest. Relatives have given the police assurance that they will advise the young man to take this course, and it was hoped that he would surrender on Monday, but the plan did not materialize. The authorities were given assurance that he would be produced before August 24th, the last day of pardon extended by the Minister of Justice.

Crown Attorney Miller is acting for the Crown at the inquest and Mr. B. Boutet for the family of the deceased. Mr. Boutet has also paid a visit to the scene of the shooting.

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“Defaulter Dead In Clash With Military Police,” Sudbury Star. August 17, 1918. Page 01.

Officers Were Targets of Fusilade of Rifle Firing.

Cyprien Gareau, aged 28, Blezard township, a defaulter under the Military Service Act, is dead from gun shot wounds received in a Dominion police search for defaulters last night. The shooting occurred at the hom of the deceased, a mile and a half from Blezard postoffice, about 3.30 this (Saturday) morning. Coroner Dr. W. R. Patterson was called by the Dominion police to attend the wounded man and found him dead. An inquest with a jury will be held Monday. Officer Tougher, who shot Gareau, surrendered himself this morning before Magistrate Brodie and has been released on $2,000 bail bonds.

With five Dominion police officers Inspector Tolmie left Sudbury last night, acting on information as to the whereabouts of a number of defaulters in Blezard township. The Gareau home was the third farmhouse the police had visited, the search of the other two having been fruitless. It was about 3.30 this morning when the Gareau home was reached. Inspector Tolmie, with two officers, was in the house examining the papers of two men, when one of the officers stepped over to a curtain which partitioned the room, in search of any other male residents of the household. As the officer threw back the curtain he was fired at point blank by a man sitting on a bed behind the curtain, only a few feet away, holding a rifle. The officers backed away and emerged from the house amid more rifle firing from inside the house. Officer Tougher responded with one shot from outside the house through the door, with the fatal effect. There are two Gareau boys defaulters under the M.S.A.  The other brother was in the house at the time, but escaped.

The Dominion police squad were not all armed, not anticipating trouble. After the affray Inspector Tolmie left three of his men on the Gareay farm as guard and came to Sudbury for rifles and ammunition, returning about 6 a.m. Throughout the night there was some firing from the bush and when the squad left the scene at about six o’clock this morning their departing automobile was subjected to a fusilade of rifle shots from the woods.

It was not until seven o’clock this morning, when a truce was declared and the officers re-entered the house, that they knew the tragedy has occurred. No outcry was made and as soon as young Gareau’s condition was learned the officers immediately summoned medical attention.

The most positive definance of the Military Service Act is evident throughout the Blezard Valley section, Inspector Tolmie informed The Star today. There are over forty defaulters and deserters listed in the district and there is not a day that some incident is not reported of lawlessness that is credited to the defaulters, including the theft of calves, sheep and fowl, and store burglarlies alleged to be committed by them in search of food for the several hiding places. The defaulters have shown nothing but contempt for the recent amnesty extended by the Minister of Justice. Word has been sent by friends to every one of the forty names posted, and there has been only one response to the offer of pardon.

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“Dom. Police To Stand Trial On Robbery Charge,” Sudbury Star. August 10, 1918. Page 08.

Officers Attached to Local Squad Out on $1,500 Bail Each

The preliminary trials of W. H. Good and F. W. Thompson, Dominion Police stationed at Sudbury and charged with robbing three Austrians of the sum of $95 on the evening of Friday, August 2, were heard in Sudbury police court Wednesday morning and afternoon. Magistrate Brodie, after hearing the crown`s witnesses committed the prisoners to stand trial at the next jury sitting of the Supreme Court, December 2nd. Bail was fixed at $1,500 for each prisoner, $1,000 of their own recognizance, and two sureties of $500 each. Charles Taylor, of Sudbury, is the bondsman. The officers have been suspended from the service.

The first witness to tesity, Evan Slobodan, an Austrian, a laborer on the C.P.R., living in a boarding car, indentified the prisoners, saying that they were the men who on Friday, August 2, came to his car about six o`clock, and started to look through his belongings. When asked to show their badge the policemen did so. Officer Good then felt his pockets and told him to lay his belt on the table, the belt containing a bank book and $140, after which Good told him to show him the contents of his grip at the other end of the car. In the meantime Thompson was counting over the money in the belt. At this juncture, according to the evidence, Good picked up a dagger on the table and asked the Austrian for his papers, but before he could produce them the officers left the car. Slobodian immediately counted his money and discovered that two ten dollar bills and four five dollar bills, $40 in all, was missing. About nine o’clock he complained to the police and accompanied them until the accused were found in Taylor’s pool room.

L. Ardrechich, another witness, in giving evidence said he was stopped by the Dominion policemen in the same care, but that after making him take off his belt and counting the money they handed it all back to him. Asked by the Crown if he was asked for any papers, witness stated that he was not. The only thing that the officers had told him was that he would have to appear in court for having so much money on him. After Good and Thompson left the car he knew nothing more of the happenings until a constable told him to come down to the police station. That was about nine o’clock the same evening.

PUT UP YOUR HANDS.
Steve Dedick looks after the lights on the switches in the C.P.R. yards and claimed to have seen accused come out of one of the boarding cars. He met the officers and was told to put up his hands, and while Thompson was searching him, Good put handcuffs on him. They then told him to take them to the car. Upon reaching the car Thompson took the money out of his pocket and then he was told to unlock the car door. On arriving inside the car, Good asked Dedick to show him his valise, and it was while searching this that Good told Thompson to take $40 out of teh $70 they had taken from Dedik’s pocket. Witness was told to be in the car at 11 o’clock that night as he would have to appear in court, but when they went outside he was told that if he would give ten dollars more it wouldn’t be necessary to appear in court. Witness made no complaint and said nothing about the incident until about ten o’clock Friday night, when a constable came for him and asked him to go to the police station, when he saw Good and Thompson.

The court then adjourned until two o’clock in the afternoon when Metro Cosczuk, another witness, also identified the prisoners as the men he had seen when he entered Dedik’s car on Friday last. Witness said the officers felt his pockets and asked him if he had any knives or guns and after being told that he hadn’t, they told him to stay in the car until they got out.

Steve Maszuk’s story did not throw any new light on the affair other than he had $75 on his person, but was not searched. Before the accused left, they asked him if he knew if any of his partners had any guns or knives.

SERGT. SCOTT’S EVIDENCE.
Sergt. Short testified that about nine o’clock on August 2, Solbodian came to the police station and laid a complaint that he had been robbed and described the men. A search was started and at the post office corner he met constable White and instructed him to go with Slobodian and search the hotels and pool rooms, after which the witness went up to the C.P.R. station. It was while at the C.P.R. station with Chief Brown that constable White had made an arrest. On his return to the police station Sergt. Scott assisted Chief Brown search Good and Thompson. They found $94.75 on the former, and a revolvver, and $4.00 on the latter. Handcuffs were also found on both men.

THE ARREST.
Constable White told of meeting Sergt. Scott and being told to search the various pool rooms and hotels and told how Slobodian had picked out the prisoners in Taylor’s pool room.

Chief Brown stated that he was present when the search of the prisoners was made and that when he asked them where they got the money, Good replied that it was his pay as a Dominion policeman and some pension money.               

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“Hold-up Last Night In the C.P.R. Yards,” Sudbury Star. August 3, 1918. Page 01.

About six o’clock Friday night two men entered the boarding car at the C.P.R. coal yard and held up three Austrians at the point of a revolver and relieved them of $50, $40 and $5 respectively, making their getaway.

The Austrians communicated with the police and about 10 o’clock P. C. White arrested W. H. Good and F. W. Thompson, two Dominion policemen in a pool room while engaged in a game of pool.

When charged with robbery on Saturday morning in the police court the two men pleaded not guilty, and were remanded till Monday morning.

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“Do Young Finns Destroy Papers To Evade M.S.A.?” Sudbury Star. May 4, 1918. Page 05.

Canadian Naturalization Papers Rare in This District.

It is the general belief in official circles here that many young men of foreign birth, other than aliens, have destroyed their Canadian naturalization papers to evade military service. Since the advent of conscription the experience of the police has been that a naturalization paper is a very rare thing, and a raid on Finland Hall, Copper Cliff, Wednesday evening, only served to strengthen the belief already held. None of the young men of military age questioned by the police had naturalization papers, despite the fact that hundreds were taken out in this district prior to the war.

The raid was made by the Dominion police, assisted by some members of the municipal and company force. A show was in progress when the police entered at 9.40 and the appearance of the officers caused so much consternation that the performance was abruptly stopped. Every male in the hall was questioned while all exits were guarded. Nine young men who had no papers whatever were taken into custody. In police court they were fined $1 and costs each for a contravention of section 16 of the M.S.A. in not having the necessary papers to assure their identity. Meanwhile the men who were fined have secured affidavits as to their nationality.

A Real Haymaker.
Nora Laroche, a Creighton woman of middle age and hefty proportions, handed K.

Acquino

, her landlord, a regular ‘haymaker’ the other day following an argument. The blow, or blows, were reinforced by a drinking glass and it required five stitches to repair Acquino. Nora wanted to have a dance in her apartment, but the landlord refused, saying the floor was unsafe. This started the fracas. She was fined $10 and costs.

He Stole Liquor.
The eagle eye of Mrs. A. Delavadova, of Creighton Mine, even at 2 a.m. in the morning, detected a shadow near the chicken coup and this was where the liquor was kept ‘to keep it out of sight of the children.’ The mysterious form moved stealthily, entered the chicken coup, placed 34 bottles in a bag and departed. He was followed, however, and seen to plant his feet under soome camouflage. Next morning, however, a search revealed only nine bottles, while three empties were found at Enrico’s house. He was sentenced to three months at Burwash.

Expensive Drinks
Three of the young Finlanders taken in the raid on Finland Hall Wednesday evening were intoxicated. They admitted drinking liquor in a public place and each paid a fine of $200 and costs.

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“Whissels Now Prisoners in Sudbury Jail,” Sudbury Star. April 20, 1918. Page 01.

Defaulter Who Shot Policeman Taken Into Custody.

Fred and Joseph Whissel, brothers, principals in the shooting of Dominion Officer McLeod near Espanola a week ago Saturday morning while Dominion officers were attempting to apprehend the elder Whissel, Fred, under the M.S.A., appeared in Sudbury police court yesterday morning charged with attempting to kill. They presented a shaggy appearance in their bush clothes and were in charge of Inspector Storie and Inspector Piper, their captors.

When the charge was read against Fred Whissel he replied ‘No, Sir.’ The younger man, Joseph, in reply to the charge read against him, started out to make a statement but was stopped by the court. The men were not allowed to plead, the preliminary hearing being adjourned for eight days. B. Boutet has been retained to defend the accused men, and it is understood the defence will take the nature of shooting under provocation and in self-defence.

Fred Whissel, the alleged Espanola defaulter, who shot Dominion constable George McLeod a week ago last night, together with his brother Joe, who took to the bush with him after the shooting affray, were taken into camp Friday morning at dawn by Provincial and Dominion policemen who had been on their [trail…] They had camped on […] night and when […] passed out of the tent in the grey dawn of Friday morning he was greeted with a command from Inspector Storie of the Provincial police, at 50-yards distance, to throw up both hands. Fred, the older boy, was then ordered out of the tent and warned not to make a false move. Both were as meek as lambs. They had a tent, blankets, provisions and were armed with a rifle and a shot gun. The officers followed them the best part of Thursday with their field glasses, seen them pitch their tents for the night and then moved down around them to wait the morning.

The hunt was taken up by Inspector Storie and his officers Monday morning, together with the Dominion police. French-Canadian and Indian guides tracked almost every footstep of the twain to their capture. The older boy is 26 and the younger 19 years. Joseph, the younger boy, it is believed, joined his older brother in his attempted escape after the shooting out of brotherly love. He is not thought to have had any hand in the shooting. The officers believe that the father aided and abetted the attempted escape by conveying to them a supply of provisions during Saturday or Sunday. No prosecution has been laid against the parents, as yet, it also being alleged that the mpother incited the older boy, Fred, to shoot officer McLeod as he did.

Officer McLeod continues to progress favorably daily, towards complete recovery, as St. Joseph’s hospital, Sudbury.

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“Dom. Officer Victim of Shots At Espanola,” Sudbury Star. April 13, 1918. Page 01.

Brother of Defaulter Fired Shots – Mother Used Poker.

Espanola, April 13. – George McLeod, a Dominion constable, was shot last night, it is believed fatally, while attempting to arrest a young man by the name of Whissel, an alleged defaulter under the Military Service Act. One bullet entered his back and another his leg. He was shot from behind a curtain by someone in the Whissel home.

The affair occured at the Whissel home about two and a half miles from Espanola, and McLeod is in such a precarious condition that he cannot be removed. Although the shooting occurred about one o’clock last night it was nearly eight o’clock this morning before medical aid could be secured, but it is now with him. The arrest of Whissel was not effected.

Constables McLeod and Tomlinson made a journey to the Whissel home last night to round up young Whissel, who is twenty-two years of age and has ignored the M.S.A. It is not their first visit to the home on the same mission. Little is known of the exact details of the affair, but from what your correspondent could gather the women became excited with the visit of the constables and incited the men folk to violence.

Numerous Dominion and Provincial police officers are on the scene this afternoon. Inspector Piper, of the Dominion Police, came in at noon. Inspector Storie, of the Provincial Police, also arrived and has called a number of his men onto the case. Constable Tomlinson would not discuss the affair in the absence of his inspector. Constable McLeod is a Thessalon man.

First Attacked With Poker.
Parties returning from the scene of the shooting this morning brought in some of the details of the affair. McLeod was first attacked with that favorite weapon, a poker, by Whissel’s mother, it is alleged, and the shots are said to have been fired by an older brother of the defaulter. The constable was still alive at two o’clock and is being removed to Espanola village on a stretcher. Whissel made good his escape and is still at large. There are eight Dominion and Provincial men on the case.

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