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Posts Tagged ‘drunk and disorderly’

“Wounded Soldier Sentenced to Jail,” Toronto Globe. September 1, 1916. Page 08.

Attorney-General Authorizes His Liberation That He May Attend Reception.

The ‘boys’ in a western Ontario city were apparently exceedingly good to a war-scarred returned soldier, with the result that the latter, as the result of his imbibing too freely, landed himself in court and was sentenced to thirty days in jail. Last night a reception was held in the city in honor of returned soldiers, and before the ceremony thoughts fastened on the unfortunate victim doing ‘time’ while the band was playing outside. Accordingly, an effort was set on foot to have the prisoner, who had valorously served his country, released, and the Attorney-General, who was communicated with yesterday afternoon, without any hesitation took the human view and authorized the soldier’s liberation. 

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‘Struck His Wife On Busy Street,” Toronto Star. August 16, 1910. Page 02.

Has Been Paying Attention to Another Woman – To Jail for 30 Days.

CASES IN THE POLICE COURT

Doctor Accused of Bigamy – Brothers Charged With Assault and Robbery.

Even from the court room above it became quite apparent that Wm. A. Fulton had radical ideas of his own as to cell decorum. Alternately he addressed fellow-prisoners in ministerial language or spouted poetry, and guffaws could be heard in greeting. Once up he cooled perceptibly.

Constable Reburn had arrested him for disorderly conduct at the station.

‘Shaking people,’ said that officer, and Fulton waits a week for a doctor’s examination.

Herchall Hertz took her insanity conviction badly. She protested, pitifully, so that all might hear, and two constables were needed to take her downstairs.

Mary Greer, aged 80, will go over to the House of Providence.

George Parker and James McDonald, drunken, pay a dollar and costs each.

Told Troubles to Policeman.
Careless of the man he accosted on the street, backed up by a hard luck tale, Philip Martin landed in Esther street police station. Unwittingly he had recounted his need for money to Provincial Constable O’Connor, so the charge was vagrancy.

He is too young in appearance for such a charge, but he pleaded guilty. Besides, he had been seen to follow a drunken man. Ten dollars and costs or 60 days.

Claiming that the gun he left in the Union Station waiting room had disappeared, William McLean, of Midland, on his way to Winnipeg, caused the arrest of Robert Dalton, fellow-traveler from Victoria Harbor. Constable Reburn locked up, for the rifled was found in his possession.

Ignorance of the circumstances was taken as a plea for not guilty.

‘Dalton claimed it at first,’ stated the officer.

Drunkenness was then promptly rung in as an excuse, but Magistrate Denison has heard it many times before, Dalton’s trip will be interrupted. He goes to jail for 30 days.

Accused of Shoplifting.
Nellie Newman, charged with shoplifting from Eaton’s, was remanded till Monday next without plea of election. The articles complained of are, a chatelaine and one lady’s sweater.

For Striking His Wife.
When several pedestrians saw Herbert Foster strike his wife in the face on the street at Yonge and Queen, they gave chase, but Foster boarded a street car and left the woman lying on the street. Detectives Guthrie and Murray came along and followed and arrested him on a charge of aggravated assault. The couple live at 99 Jarvis street.

‘Why?’ questioned Crown Attorney Corley.

‘There’s another woman in the case, and I kept following him.’

‘No, no,’ Foster shook his head.

The wife stated circumstances of their domestic life, which held Foster up to censure and only a threat from the magistrate forced Foster into an admission that the second woman had wrecked the peace of their family. He goes to jail for 30 days.

Farmers at the Market.
The Humber Bay Farmers, E. Powitt, and W. Griggsby, charged with a breach of the law defining the sale of farm produce in that they sold produce on the St. Lawrence Market not in barrels, bags, or bushels, but in broken portions of those measures, were given a second remand. Their counsel, A. R. Hassard, had not yet carried out his intention to go before the Board of Control to ask for a change in the regulation. He stated he would carry his appeal before those officials at today’s meeting.

Will Support Wife.
William Wells named bright prospects. Though he had not yet contributed to the support of the wife, Elizabeth Wells, as stipulated by the court on July 27, he would go out on the road and sell stuff. He is a traveler.

The second chance was given.

Bought the Harness.
To look up the man who sold him the harness parts for 30 cents, Herbert Bennett was given a remand. A witness was produced, who bought the goods from Bennett for eighty cents, and originally they were stolen from J. Battalta. The charge was theft.

On a conviction of gross indecency Charles F. Brown will go to jail for sixty days.

Ethel Gibson was quite frank: she did not deny stealing 5 ½ yards of ribbon from the Jas. Vise Company. It was her first offence. She promised not to repeat it, so a chance was given.

Michael Tellman, convicted of the theft of jewelry from Samuel Siegel, goes to jail for ten days.

Lost a $20 Bill.
David Stein declared he mistook a twenty dollar bill for a two and handed it to Loretta O’Hara in change from his auction mart in Yonge street, so charged her with theft.

But there had been many customers, the girl knew nothing of the twenty, and T. C. Robinette produced her bank book which showed accurate accounting to correspond with her funds. The charge was dismissed.

Doctor on Bigamy Charge.
Though yesterday afternoon when detained by Inspector Kennedy of the Morality Department, on a charge of bigamy, Dr. Herbert Edward Shepherd, who has practised for a number of years at 15 Gloucester street, admitted three marriages, he claimed to be innocent of the bigamy charge, on the grounds that the first marriage had been dissolved, and that he had been separated from the second wife for more than seven years before contracting the third marriage.

Complaint was received rom the first wife, Mabel Louisa Saunders, who was marred in Barrie, 1869, and who is now living a Duck Lake, Sask., with some of their children. It is alleged that in July, 1883, he left her with six children, and that later he married a second time, and that he married Lucy A. Moore of Goderich, in September, 1908. This wife was living with him when the arrest was made.

Normal Heyd, appearing as counsel, pleaded not guilty, and offered as explanation the statement that a divorce had been granted on December 18, 1867, in Michigan, where the doctor was practising at the time.

Crown Attorney Corley merely offered to put in the two marriages certificates as evidence, and Mr. Heyd consented to waive examination of witnesses, and asked to go over before a jury for trial.

The same bail of $1,000, given by Mr. J. Hazelton, stands, and the case will come before the next assizes.

Brothers Accused.
Lords and Abraham Pancer, brothers, of 47 Chesnut street, tailors, were charged with assaulting Arthur Swartz of 122 Edward street, in Edward street Saturday night, and robbing him of $130. The plea was not guilty, no evidence was taken, bail of $200 being accepted for hearing on the 18th.

Complaining there were pickings from the ice wagons, and that an example was necessary, the Belle Ewart Ice Company caused the arrest of Henry Street, a teamster.

‘I took a little that was left over from the route,’ admitted Street, ‘but it went to pay for shoeing the horses, sharpening ice tongs, axe, and to pay for my dinner.’

‘You should have told the company,’ advised the magistrate, but the charge was dismissed.

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“Sudbury Police Court,” Sudbury Star. August 10, 1918. Page 05.

Magistrate Brodie intimated in Friday morning’s court that from now on he was going to fine all alien enemies for not carrying papers and Mich. Radomski and D. Mumylyk, hailing from Romford, paid ten dollars and costs for failing to have received permission to come to Sudbury.

IN WRONG, SURE.
Peter Yabokoski was found in an intoxicated condition at the C.P.R. depot Thursday night and when he was searched it was discovered that he had left his papers in a grip at Murray Mine where he had been working. It cost him $10 and costs his fount of joy, and five and costs for not having his papers.

PREVIOUS RECORD COUNTED.
Leon  Michiniowicz was charged with not being employed at a useful occupation on the 9th day of July. He stated that he had worked at the Mond smelter at Coniston but had left owing to ‘his work injuring his health.’ At the time of his arrest he was learning to run a jitney car and at the preent has a jitney. His worship in dismissing the case gave Michniowicz a chance, seeing that he had worked at the smelter five years.

ALLOWED TO GO.
Jules Chalifoux, who was arrested sometime ago for stealing a sum of money on the 3rd of July was allowed to go Friday, owing to the fact that the plaintiff in the charge cannot be located.

A Conistion party appeared Thursday morning to have a family quarrel straightened out. Peter Petryna claimed that Tomas Bilyj had trhown a bottle at him and struck him on the back as he was removing some cases which Bilyj had thrown on the defendant’s property. Much abusive language was exchanged reflecting on both families and the complaint was laid as a result. Magistrate Brodie told the parties interested that the affair was a small thing, expressing a hope that they would go back and live in harmony with one another, and try to patch up there differences. Bilyj was fined $1 and costs.

$200 AND COSTS.
On Wednesday, Alex. Juval requested the court to let his charge of having liquor in other than a private dwelling stand over until Thursday morning, and after having slept over it, he pleaded guilty to the charge and paid $200 and costs.

CASE DISMISSED.
The charge against E. Waugh of having more than fifteen days’ supply of flour on hand was dismissed on Thursday, as the court was convinced that he did not have an over supply of flour at one time. In fact, evidence was brought forward to the effect that it would only last him about fifteen days.

THREE STAR BRANDY
When Nathaniel James was told that he was charged with being drunk he pleaded guilty and told his Worship that he was drinking Three Star brandy. It cost Nat. $10 and costs, and he was told that if he didn’t leave the stars alone it would be a prison term next time.

TOOK CHANCE
Horace Chamberlain admitted that he was in a hurry and that he passed a standing street car while pasengers were alighting.

‘If you are willing to take those chance it will cost you $5 and costs,’ said his Worshhip.

BACK AGAIN
Hilda Maki, Coniston, after having just been released from the reformatory, again appeared at the court Thursday. The magistrate did not read any charge against the woman, but remanded her to enable two physicians to examine her and ascertain the condition of her mental faculties.

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“Copper Cliff Police Court,” Sudbury Star. August 3, 1918. Page 04.

For driving his auto without front lights Negosanti Wario, an Italian, was fined $1 and costs in Wednesday’s police court.

Geo. Lark, of Sudbury, paid $1 and costs for driving his car without a front marker.

Henry Renni, Finlander, also failed to burn two front lights, and paid $1 and costs. The law now is that both lights, not one as formerly, must be burning after dusk.

Richard Death, Sr., charged with having neither front or rear lights, produced a witness, in addition to himself to counteract the evidence of the policeman, and was given the benefit of the doubt by Magistrate Stoddart.

In Friday’s police court, Leone Satore, Italian, drunk in Copper Cliff on July 19th, paid $20 and costs. An analysis of the liquor which proved his undoing, showed it to be 19.87 per pecent. proof spirits, and Crema Mario, the owner, paid $200 and costs for a breach of the O.T.A. in having liquor in other than a private place.

Henry Rintamski, a returned soldier, neglected to burn a rear light on his motor cycle, and was let down with payment of court costs.

P. J. Grenon didn’t have either rear or side lights on his side-car motor cycle. $1 and costs.

Liugi Palma, Italian, parted with $1 and costs for failing to burn front lights.

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“Two Prisoners Are Missing and Also Constable,” Sudbury Star. July 31, 1918. Page 04.

According to advices which have reached the Sudbury police two prisoners and a guard, en route from Iroquois Falls to the Burwash Industrial Farm, are missing. No trace can be found of any one of the three, and the last seen of the prisoners was at Sturgeon Falls, at which place they had motored from North Bay. The prisoners were in an intoxicated condition.

A telegram which reached Sudbury Monday night gave the names of the men as Stanley Martin, sentenced to three months, and Angus McDonald, sentenced to one month. They left Iroquois Falls last Friday morning in charge of Special Constable Pete Kennedy and were last seen in Sturgeon Falls Saturday evening in an intoxicated condition, without the constable.

Martin’s age is given at 22, weight about 158, height 5′ 8″, complexion light, short sighted, wears glasses, clean shaven.

McDonald, is 23, weighs 145 pounds, 5′8″ in height, light complexion, usually wears glasses and clean shaven.

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“‘Big Push’ Has Begun On The Drug Habit,” Toronto Star. July 28, 1916. Page 14.

Three Cases Were Tried To-Day and Two Jail Farm Sentences Given.

OUTFITS CONFISCATED

One of Those Charged Said Dead Mother Had Owned Paraphernalia

From the fact that three cases of alleged illegal use of morphine and other related opiates followed each other in the Police Court calendar to-day, it would appear that the police had begun to start their ‘big push’ against the ‘coke’ traffic, which recent convictions would seem to prove was waxing as the liquor traffic waned.

An elaborate outfit, consisting of hypodermic needles, syringes, a pair of scales and a quantity of morphine sulphate, approximating to 60 grains, formed substantial evidence against Harry Fontroy. Plainclothesmen Scott and Neill testified to having found the foregoing line-up in Fontroy’s possession and to have caught him in the act of injecting the illegal drug in his arm.

The young man, who has both African and Chinese blood in his veins, claimed that he had been cured of the habit. ‘That outfit belonged to my mother, who died two weeks ago. I found it in her drawer,’ he pleaded. Inspector Geddes disproved this claim by quoting a statement which the young man had made to him. He had admitted that he was ‘tapering off with 30 grains a day.’

‘The last time he appeared on this charge he was given leniency on the understanding that he inform the police the source of his illegal supplies. He has not done this.’ said Mr. Corley. Col. Denison committed him to the jail farm for five months.

‘Coke’ Vendor Jailed.
In addition to the foregoing charge, that of having morphine in his possession for other than medicinal purposes, had coupled against him the police claim that he had sold the drug.

In his possession had been found some dozen packages of both cocaine and morphine which Drake had acknowledged he had been in the habit of selling for a dollar a package.

‘This man, I hear, has been taking from 30 to 40 grains a day,’ said the Crown Attorney.

‘He has had consumption for the last eight or nine years,’ his wife stated in explanation of his drug habit.

‘I am curing him slowly,’ she added.

Drake also goes to the jail farm for a five-month ‘cure.’ In the woman’s court Tillie Evans faced with the same charge received a remand for a week.

Proof Enough.
The actions of Isaac Gilbert spoke louder than his words in proving the charge of drunkeness and disorderliness alleged against him. Eveidence showed that he endeavored to take on six feet two of solid constanbulary muscle, and in addition ‘lick the whole street.’

‘You must have been very drunk,’ sighed the squire. An added count against him was his association with a team of horses. The squire felt grieved that the noble animals had to witness such an orgy of inebriation. Remanded for sentences.

Quick Work.
One minute sufficed to change Jerry Long from a prisoner in the dock with a long and substantial record of drunkeness into laborer with the prospect of two months’ healthy toil ahead. Squire Ellis merely looked at Long and knew that his record resembled his name. Twnety dollars and costs or sixty days.

Got the Habit.
Jeremiah Flaherty has the polishing habit. He, according to his own statement, polishes off brass in the day time, and according to the constable, polishes off drinks in quick succession at night. Yesterday he appeared on the same charge. It was but a little drop ‘for his stomach’s sake,’ he claimed. Remanded for sentence.

Hostilities.
As both Sandy Jaegar and John Jacobson with one accord disclaimed responsibility for the hostilities in whcih they were found engaged, the court presumed that it must have been the heat of a case of spontaneous combustion. Police evidence, however, tended to show that Jacobson had figured prominently, both at the start and the finish. He was fined $2 and costs or ten days.

‘Pinched’ a Pom.
That Daniel J. O’Shea should consider a pomeranian dog worth the trouble of annexing, appeared rather strange to Col. Denison when O’Shea pleaded guilty to the offence. The owner placed the value at over $10. ‘I consider dogs worth about ten cents gross,’ interjected his Worship. ‘The man stole the dog and sold it to a Mr. Walters for $10,’ explained the Crown Attorney. ‘Mr. Walters subsequently saw the animal advertised for, and at once communicated with the police. O’Shea, who had ‘blown in’ the proceeds of his act, was remanded one week for sentence, on the understanding that restitution would be made. Pinky Pankey Poo was permitted to meander home with his mistress.

Poetry and Prose.
Frank Martin’s poetry, prose and actions are equally bad, according to Squire Ellis’ ruling after a perusal of all. On a grimy car the alleged poet submitted the following:

‘To-day a poor cripple appeales for your aid.
Don’t turn with a sneer or a frown,
For God in His Mercy is the only one knows
When a loved one of yours will go down.’

The prose followed.

‘Price – Please give what you wish.’

His actions, described by himself, were living an exemplary life, and the brisk bartering of many pencils, described by several feminine witnesses, they consist of the exploitation of the grimy quatrain, a fond pressure of the hand, and the claim that he was a wounded warrior back from the war. – $50 and costs or six months.

Not content with the profit pouring into the coffers of his ice-cream soda fountain by reason of the weatherman’s climbing thermometer, Dragutin Radinrobitch, according to the police, ran a sideline in the form of a gambling den. The charge alleged that he permitted these quiet numbers round the table in his ice-cream parlors. Four guilty – $20 and costs or 30 days.

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“Disturbance at Portsmouth,” Kingston Daily Standard. July 23, 1912. Page 08.

Longshoremen employed at unloading a coal boat at Portsmouth created a disturbance at the Bay last night as the result of indulging too freely. Village Constable Cross was at the scene of the disturbance, and succeeded in arresting one member of the gang. At a special session of the police court at the village hall the prisoner was brought before Magistrate Hunter and fined $5 and costs for disturbing the peace.

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