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Posts Tagged ‘escaped convict’

“Gets 2 Years For Holdup Of Taximan,” The Globe and Mail. October 25, 1938. Page 03.

Sentence for Robbery With Violence Runs Concurrently With 10-Year Term Already Imposed

One Man Still Sought

Sudbury, Oct. 24 (Special). – With five police officers present in the courtroom, Maurice Fisette, 27, one of the trio who on Oct. 2, held up and robbed Tom Campbell, Sudbury taxi driver, pleaded guilty to the theft of a car and robbery with violence. He was sentenced to two years in Portsmouth penitentiary on each charge, the sentences to run concurrently.

Fisette accepted his sentence, without giving any clue as the identity of the third man who is still at liberty. Harold Olsen, a member of the trio, was struck by a police bullet which glanced off a rock, as police attempted to apprehend the men about 100 miles west of Sudbury. Olsen died in the Red Cross Hospital at Blind River the following day. At the inquest which followed Constable J. Brown, who fired the fatal bullet, was absol;ved of all blame in connection with the bandit’s death.

Before sentence was pased FIsette asked ‘for a chance to go straight.’ He told Magistrate J. S. McKessock he already had a ten-year sentence to serve and pleaded for leniency ‘to give me time to get out and go straight.’ Magistrate McKessock expressed the opinion in passing sentence Fisette had ‘already wasted your opportunities.’

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“Convict Says Police Deliberately Shot His Pal; Jury Unconvinced,” The Globe and Mail. October 8, 1938. Page 04.

Admits He Escaped Jail, but Declares He Will Tell Truth; Accidental Death Is Verdict

Blind River, Oct. 7 (Special.) – An escaped convict, who admitted he had ‘lost count’ of the number of times he had been in prison, failed to convince a Coroner’s jury here today that Provincial Constable John Brown deliberately fired at and killed Harold Olsen, one of the trio that held up and robbed a Sudbury taxi driver. The jury brought in a verdict that Olsen’s death was an accident, and that the bullet fired by the officer was deflected.

The evidence of C. Fissette, who is alleged to have taken part in the holdup, along with Olsen and a third man, was the feature of the inquest. He admitted escaping from Amos when taken there from the St. Jean de Paul Penitentiary [sic], where he was serving a ten-year term for a hold-up. Subsequent to this, he said, he was arrested on a charge of breaking and entering, and of escaping from prison at Portage la Prairie.

‘Will Tell Truth’
‘I may be an escaped convict, but I will tell the truth,’ he declared, reiterating that the police officer had deliberately fired at Olsen. He admitted taking the car, but said it was not a ‘stickup.’

‘This is not the first shooting affray with the police that you have got into?’ asked J. L. O’Flynn, counsel for Constable Brown. ‘What are those marks on your body?’

‘Those are the marks of the paddles used on me in the penitentiary,’ replied Fissette.

‘But those other marks,’ persisted counsel.

‘I don’t have to tell you about that,’ retorted Fissette.

Thomas Campbell, Sudbury taxi-driver, told of having his money and his car taken from him by Fissette and his companions and of being threatened with death if he failed to do what his passengers told him.

Constable Testifies.
Provincial Constable Brown stated that with Gordon McGregor he went to arrest Fissette and his companions following the report of the holdup. He told of warning McGregor not to shoot at any one unless he was shot at first and then only to stop the car. He stated he expected the men to be armed when he started out. On seeing the men approaching, near 10 o’clock at night, he ordered them to halt. Fissette halted but the other men ran. He fired two shots into the ground from his revolver, while McGregor fired one from the rifle into the ground. Later he fired a single shot into the bush from the rifle and three shots to call other policemen to his aid. Some time later Olsen called from the darkness that he had been shot and was found shot through the right shoulder. The officer produced a section of railway tie to show that one of the bullets fired had gone through it when he shot into the ground: McGregor corroborated the officer in every detail.

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“Prisoner Said To Be Quebec Jail-Breaker,” The Globe and Mail. October 5, 1938. Page 02.

Identified by Fingerprints; Companion, Wounded by Police Bullets, Dies

Blind River, Oct. 4 – (CP) – Captured Sunday night when police bullets mortally wounded a companion after the theft of a taxi at Sudbury, eighty miles away, a prisoner in the small jail here was identified today as Morris Fiset alias Gravelle who slugged a guard and escaped from Jail at Amos, Que., July 24.

Fiset, identified by fingerprints had refused constantly since his capture to disclose his identity. He said it was up to police to find out.

Fiset was arrested after Tommy Campbell, Sudbury cab-driver, told police at Spanish, half way between Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie, three men who hired him to drive them to Whitefish stole his car.

A man who said his was name was Harold Olsen, an escaped convict from Washington D.c., died today in hospital from a bullet wound suffered in a chase after the men deserted the taxi in a ditch near Serpent River bridge. A third man escaped and police are scouring the district for him.

Object of Wide Search.
Fiset was the object of a wide police search since his escape from Amos jail, where had he had been transferred, police said, from St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, near Montreal. He had been taken to Amos to stand trial.

Police claim also he was wanted in Manitoba.

Tommy Campbell, the cab driver, told police the men hired him Sunday afternoon at Sudbury. When they reached Whitefish, he said, he felt a gun in his back and he was commanded tersely to ‘move over, we are taking your car.’ Campbell said the men warned him to be careful because ‘we are escaped convicts from the United States.’

Campbell escaped from the car at Spanish and the men continued but the car piled into a ditch a few miles away and they fled on foot. Police, however, already were on their trail and they were sighted near the Serpent River Bridge. Four shots were fired by police and one of the bullets struck Olsen.

Guard Slugged.
Amos, Que., Oct. 4 (CP). – Maurice Fisette, believed to be held by police at Blind River, Ont., after a companion had been killed by police bullets, has been a fugitive from Quebec officers since he strong-armed his way out of jail here July 24.

Serving a 10-year term in St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary for holdup, he had been brought here from the Montreal prison for trial on theft charges. Convicted, he was sentenced to three years, to run concurrently with his previous term.

While awaiting in the town jail for his return to Montreal, Fisette broke out of his cell and scaled the prison wall to freedom. On the way out, he overpowered a guard who tried to stop him.

Some weeks later, he was taken at Portage La Prairie, Man. But just as a pair of provincial detectives were setting out from here to bring him back, word came from the West that he had broken jail again.

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“Identify Prisoner As One Who Beat Way Out At Amos,” Ottawa Citizen. October 4, 1938. Page 23.

Canadian Press

BLIND RIVER, Ont.,  Oct. 4 – Captured Sunday night when police bullets mortally wounded a companion after the theft of a taxi at Sudbury, 80 miles away, a prisoner in jail here was identified today as Morris Fisette alias Gravelle who slugged a guard and escaped from Jail at Amos, Que., July 24.

Fisette, identified by fingerprints had refused constantly since his capture to disclose his identity. He said it was up to police to find out.

Fisette was arrested after Tommy Campbell, Sudbury cab driver, told police at Spanish, half way between Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie, three men who hired him to drive them to Whitefish, stole his cab.

A man who said his was name was Harold Olsen, an escaped convict from Washington D.c., died today in hospital from a bullet wound suffered in a chase after the men deserted the taxi in a ditch near Serpent River bridge. A third man escaped and police are scouring the district for him.

SLUGGED WAY OUT
AMOS, Que., Oct. 4 – Maurice Fisette, held by police at Blind River, Ont., after a companion had been killed by police bullets, has been a fugitive from Quebec officers since he strong-armed his way out of jail here July 24.

Serving a 10-year term in St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary for holdup, he had been brought here from the Montreal prison for trial on theft charges. Convicted, he was sentenced to three years, to run concurrently with his previous term.

While awaiting in the town jail for his return to Montreal, Fisette broke out of his cell and scaled the prison wall to freedom. On the way out, he overpowered a guard who tried to stop him.

Some weeks later, he was taken at Portage La Prairie, Man. But just as a pair of provincial detectives were setting out from here to bring him back, word came from the West that he had broken jail again. 

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“Maurice Fisette de nouveau en liberté,” La Patrie. September 13, 1938. Night edition. Page 05.

“Capturé hier matin par la police de Portage-la-Prairie, au Manitoba, après évadé de la prison d’Amos le 24 juillet dernier, Maurice Fisette, alias Trudeau, alias Gravel, 24 ans, est de nouveau en liberté.

Hier soir il a pu fuir de la prison de Portage-la-Prairie après avoir assommé son gardien à l’aide d’une de ses bottes.  Il enleva les clefs à sa victime et sortit de la prison en escaladant le mur de la cour.

Fisette devait être ramené à Montréal par la police provinciale pour purger une sentence de dix ans au bagne de Saint-Vincent de Paul.

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“Escaped Prisoner Held In Manitoba,” Montreal Gazette. September 13, 1938. Page 13.

“Maurice Fisette, St. Vincent de Paul Convict, Caught at Portage la Prairie

Sought throughout the country since July 24, when he escaped from jail at Amos, Que., after overpowering a guard, Maurice Fisette, alias Gaston Gravel, 24-year-old Montreal convict, was captured yesterday at Portage la Prairie, according to word received last night by Coll. J. Redmond Roche, Montreal superintendent, Quebec Provincial Police.

The fugitive, sentenced to 10 years’ imprisonment in St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary on March 12, was taken to the Amos jail to face other charges of theft early in July.  He had been convicted on the Amos charges and had been sentenced to a three-year-term to run concurrently with the Montreal sentence, when he escaped on eve of the scheduled return to St. Vincent de Paul penitentiary.

Well known to Montreal police authorities, Fisette had been arrested many times in this district under the name of Gaston Gravel. In 1932, he was sentenced to a total of three years’ imprisonment on charges of theft and receiving stolen automobiles.  Previous to 1933 he had been arrested eight times, mostly on charges of automobile theft.

Registered in police files here as a native of St. Lambert, Fisette was waiting to be escorted back to Montreal on the night of the 24th, when he made his break from the Amos jail.”

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“Le Bandit Mysterieux S’Echappe De La Prison D’Amos,” La Gazette du Nord. July 29, 1938. Page 01.

“Maurice Fiset, surnommé le bandit mystérieux qui semait la terreur à Val D’Or et à Malarctic et tenait la police provinciale sur les épines depuis plusieurs semaines, a a réussi à s’échapper, dimanche soir, le 24 juillet, de la prison d’Amos

 il attendait son transport au pénitencier de St-Vincent de Paul pour purger concurrement pendant 10 ans une échelle de 26 années de condamnations à lui imposées par M. le Magistrat Armand Boily, pour une série de vols à main armée.

Alors que ver les 9 heures du soir tous les prisonniers se disposaient à regagner leur lit, Fisset profita de ce moment pour s’enfuir dans la cour de la prison, débarrer à l’aide d’une broche le cadenas de la porte de service et prendre la clé des champs.  Le géôlier d’Amos se mit à sa poursuite, mais Fiset, un colosse de près de 6 pieds le terrassa et disparut avant que les gardes mobilisées par le 

géôlier ne pussent le rejoindre.

Sur les ordres du Colonel Piuze, Chef de la Sûreté Provinciale, la chasse au fugitif est organisée, tous les trains sont surveillés étroitement pendant que des battues générales fouillent tous les taillis et les forêts du voisinage.

Une foule de rapports contradictoires annoncent la présence du fugitif à toutes les sections du C.N.R., les uns le voient à Doucet, d’autres à Parent et on découvre un moment donné que Fiset, un beau gaillard de 5 pieds 11 pouces, aussi chic qu’Arsène Lupin et qui a plutôt l’air d’une honnête homme que d’un bandit, est toujours au large.

Les recherches se poursuivent.”  

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