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Posts Tagged ‘great depression’

“Indians Ask Ottawa Aid,” The Globe & Mail. October 27, 1938. Page 03.

Fort William, Oct. 26 (Special). – Seeking redress from the great white father for ills suffered by their tribesmen, five chiefs of Rainy River Indian bands left here today for Ottawa.

The five chiefs will protest particularly against prosecutions of Indians by the Ontario Department of Game and Fisheries for taking moose, deer and other food animals contrary to provincial regulations. They contend that treaties made in the time of Queen Victoria gave their bands perpetual right to hunt and fish. They also will protest against flooding of part of their reserves through control of river waters by lumber company dams.

Some of the Rainy River reserves escaped narrowly from the forest fires recently, which drove all game and fur bearing animals out of the vicinity and made the plight of the Indians more than usually difficult.

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“Youths Given Hard Labor,” The Globe and Mail. October 27, 1938. Page 03.

Barrie, Oct. 26 (Special). – Magistrate Compton Jeffs today sentenced three youthful burglars who entered Reeves jewelry store here at an early hour on October 14, stealing more than $2,000 worth of watches, rings and cigaret holders. The loot was recovered two days later in a house at 26 Beatty Avenue, Toronto, through the efforts of Toronto police detectives and local police.

His Worship meted out terms of twelves months definite plus twelve indeterminate, at hard labor, in the Ontario reformatory, to each of the three youths.

Mike Kornick, aged 18, no address, and Alex. Young, aged 18, no address, pleaded guilty a week ago to breaking and entering. Walter Andrews, aged 22, residing on Beatty Avenue, Toronto, where the loot was recovered by Toronto detectives, pleaded guilty to receiving stolen goods.

Magistrate Jeffs treated each alike in passing sentence. Charges of receiving had been withdrawn against two others.

‘I am influenced to this extent,’ he said. ‘When you consider the deliberate and extensive looting, my first idea was that it was a case for Portsmouth Penitentiary, but in view of what has been said as to your youth, and in hope that leniency may have some influence on you, I have decided that your sentence will be served in Ontario reformatory.’

Crown Attorney F. A. Hammond, K.C. pointed out that Young had a record dating back to 1935, and that both he and Kornick had used aliases

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“Two Weeks In Jail on Assault Charge,” Ottawa Citizen. October 26, 1938. Page 04.

Anthony Menchini, 502 Rochester street, was sentenced by Magistrate Strike to two weeks in jail for assaulting Francis Taylor, 69 Second Avenue.

On the night of October 15th, Taylor, his brother-in-law, Walter Rockburn, 64 Adeline Street, and three women relatives, were on Preston street near Norman laughing and talking among themselves. For the prosecution it was alleged that Menchini and his friend, Albert Carmanico, 438 1-2 Preston street, approached them and resented the laughing which they thought was at them. Rockburn and Carmanico wrestled and for the prosecution it was testified that Menchini hit Rockburn while Carmanico held him and that then Menchini struck Taylor who protested against the assault on Rockburn. The evidence was that Taylor was knocked down by the first blow and that as he tried to get to his feet Menchini struck him again, knocking him unconscious and fracturing his left jaw. Mrs. Taylor said Menchini then tried to kick her husband when he was on the ground but she pushed him aside.

‘It is fortunate for you that you are not charged with a more serious offence,’ said the Magistrate. ‘There is nothing to justify what you did. It is the sort of thing I dislike from a man of the bulky type, a big, husky fellow. It is difficult to understand the mentality of a man who would do that sort of thing, especially the second blow.’

Medical evidence was given that Taylor would be unable to work for eight or nine weeks.

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“Iroquois Hear Chiefs Preach From Wampum,” The Globe and Mail. October 25, 1938. Page 03.

Teachings of Their Prophet, Handsome Lake, Proclaimed in Native Tongue; to Stage Great Feather Dance Today

150 Tribesmen Met

Ohawekan, Ont., Oct. 24 (CP). – Braves and squaws of the Iroquois Tribe that once ruled North America gathered today around long tables to hear tribal chieftains preach in native tongue from the ‘wampum,’ Indian bible based on teachings of the prophet, ‘Handsome Lake.’

The ceremony was part of the opening rites of the three-day convention at the Six Nations Reserve, conducted by Chief Fred Bonsberry and Chief C. Williams of the Senecas.

The convention has attracted Iroquois chiefs from parts of Canada and New York State, Chief Rodeye of Syracuse, noted Indian preacher, is expected tomorrow.

Following exhortations that sometimes last three yours, ceremonial dances are held. The daily powows end with distribution of corn cake and berry wine.

A highlight of tomorrow’s festivities will be the ‘great feather dance,’ one of the most sacred of Indian dances. Individual chants will be the feature of Wednesday’s program.

The convention closes with a peach stone betting game in which all kinds of articles, clothing and blankets are polled and ‘winner takes all.’

About 150 tribesmen are gathered for the festival, near Altkins Corners, three miles from here. The reserve is twenty miles from Brantford.

The main object of the festival is to give thanks to the Manitou or Great Spirit for plentiful crops.

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“Immediate Aid Is Demanded By Workless,” The Globe and Mail. October 25, 1938. Page 03.

Port Arthur, Oct. 24 (Special) – Unemployed crowded the Port Arthur city council chamber tonight to present a petition, signed by 804 men, urging immediate relief until work could be provided for them.

The petition urged a wide-scale work program by Dominion and provincial governments, mentioning particularly resumption of work on the trans-Canada highway, clearing a right of way on the projected road from Geraldton to Hearst, a housing program in Port Arthur, the St. Lawrence waterway, and reforestation, as needed works that would benefit this district and provide employment.

‘The situation this year in the bush camps, with probably only one-quarter the men working that there were last year, is inevitable in view of the unprecedented amount of wood which the Ontario government permitted to be cut for export last year,’ said Mayor C. W. Cox, M.L.A. 

‘The market has been flooded and now bushmen are idle. There is too much dictation in the east about problems in the north, by people who know too little about this part of Canada. Not enough consideration is given to the views of the elected representatives who know conditions,’ said his Worship.

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“Camps Urged For Jobless,” The Globe and Mail. October 22, 1938. Page 04.

Public Work in Centres Similar to C.C.C. Project in U.S. Suggested to Ottawa by Rev C. E. Silcox

‘PEACE EMERGENCY’

To appeals on behalf of unemployed transients made to the Federal government by the Community Welfare Council of Ontario and the Welfare Council of Toronto, there was added yesterday a further appeal from the general secretary of the Social Service Council of Canada.

He suggested camps similar to the C.C.C. camps in the United States for younger men, and separate similar camps for the older.

The position of unemployed transients, of whom 110 are being temporarily housed in Holy Trinity Parish Hall, Toronto, was described by Rev. C. E. Silcox, General Secretary of the Council, in a letter to Hon. Norman Rogers, Minister of Labor, yesterday as ‘a peace emergency,’ and a responsibility of the Federal Government.

‘If we confronted a war emergency – and we came very close to it – the barriers would soon be removed,’ said Mr. Silcox in his message. ‘This is a peace emergency which confronts us and here, too, some solid thinking and co-operation will help mightily.’

‘There would be no necessity for us to make the mistakes which were made in the previous experiment in such camps in this country,’ he wrote. ‘In camps for both the younger and the middle-aged, a certain amount of military training and discipline, together with suitable educational facilities would be wholesome. If these camps could be located where some useful public work is being put through, it would be all to the good. The men might even be employed in the laying out of new and important air fields.

‘In view of the international situation, I strongly believe Canada should not allow any of her human resources to rot and that economic sense, a decent respect for the principles of humanity and even prudential considerations involving a potential military situation, combine to make government action imperative.’

Mr. Silcox pointed to the work camps in Germany and remarked: ‘Much as I dislike most of the things for which Mr. Hitler stands, I cannot fail to recognize that there are certain obvious responsibilities of government that seem to be understood better by dictatorships than by democracies.’

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“Paul-Emile Beaulieu fera

vingt ans de pénitencier,” Le Soleil. October 21, 1938. Page 27.

Le juge Thomas Tremblay a condamné aujourd’hui, à
20 ans, de pénitencier Paul-Emile Beaulieu, le plus
vieux des frères Beaulieu qui tentèrent un vol à main
armée à Beaupré.

POUR VOLS ET ASSAUT

Le plus vieux des frères Beaulieu
qui tentèrent un vol à main armée
à la banque de Beaupré, Paul-Emile
Beaulieu, a été condamné à 20 ans
de pénitencier par le juge Thomas
Tremblay. Cette sentence le punit
aussi d’avoir assailli sur la grande
route, à la pointe du revolver, en
août dernier, une dame Roméo Michel
afin de lui voler l’argent fait
au marché de Québec. Les deux
j frères admirent ces exploits commis en commun. Joseph Beaulieu, le plus jeune des frères, recevra sa sentence mercredi prochain si sa
santé le lui permet.

 "Vous avez fait de la prison et ou
pénitencier", dit le juge Thomas
Tremblay, “sans revenir à de meilleurs
sentiments. Vous êtes des bandits
de grande envergure, dangereux
pour la société, et je vous impose
une longue sentence afin de
vous empêcher de monter sur l’échaufaud.”
Me Ancina Tardif, avocat
du ministère public, déclara
qu’entre un voleur armé et un
meurtrier il n’y avait que la différence
de l’occasion. 

A l’adresse de la sûreté provinciale,
Me Tardif s’exprima ainsi: “Le public
ignore trop souvent les actes de courage de nos policiers. Que l’on
songe bien que dans ce cas-ci les
policiers avaient à faire face à un
des accusés qui tenait déjà en respect le gérant de la banque, à la
pointe du revolver. En telle cirI
constance, il est plausible de croire
que l’assaillant ne se laissera pas désarmer
sans résistance. Que l’on n’oublie pas qu’il a 1 an, Chateauneuf tomba foudroyé par une balle criminelle et qu’Aubin était sérieusement
blessé. Que le public n’oublie
pas ces faits et collabore davantage avec la police.“ 

On se souvient que des policiers,
dont M. Ephrem Bégin, attendaient
les deux Beauüeu à l’intérieur de’
la banque de Beaupré. Me Ancina
Tardif demanda ensuite l’imposition
de sévères sentences. Il est heureux,
ajouta-t-il. que les accusés ne
soient pas devant le tribunal sous
des accusations de meurtres; car entre
un meurtrier et un voleur armé,
il n’y a que la différence de l’occasion.” Il adressa enfin des félicitations
aux directeurs de la sûreté
provinciale.

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