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“Garson Farmer Faces Charge Of Harboring,” Sudbury Star. August 21, 1918. Page 03.

Dominion Police State Edward Martell Is Hiding Cousin.

The first charge of harboring a deserter to be laid by the Dominion Police at Sudbury was read in Monday morning’s police court, against Edward Martell, Garson township. He is charged with harboring John Martell, his cousin, a deserter from the C.E.F. The case was adjourned until Saturday morning next. It is understood that the court is prepared to take a lenient view of the case providing that in the meantime Pte. Martell, the deserter, is delivered to the military. B. Boutet appeared for accused Monday morning and entered a plea of not guilty.

While this is the first charge of harboring to be instituted by the Dominion Police, there have been many instances where prosecution could have been started for harboring, aiding and abetting. Flagrant cases have been known to the police, in which the mothers of the offenders have played important parts and it was mainly for this reason that no action was taken.

MORE SHOOTING
More shooting is reported from Garson township in addition to that which took place and is daily taking place in Blezard township. The Dominion police last Thursday went out to the Edward Martell farm in Garson township and while making enquiries at the farm house were shot at by some one, presumably John Martell, the deserter, who was concealed in the barn. He later made good his escape to the bush and is still at large.

BOOZE BURIED IN GROUND
The Ontario Temperance Act is no respecter of persons. It may happen that Luigi Augustini, hard working man and the father of five young children, one of whom is very sick, may have to go to jail for three months. There is, however, another side to the story, that of Chief Brown, of the municipal police.

The hardship plea failed to move the court Monday morning when Augustini was fined $300 and costs. A few days ago one Koski, up on a drunk charge, disclosed the source of his supply, a case being later found buried beside the Augustini residence. The plea that some one else had buried the case beside the house was also put forth, the possibilities of which were dwelt upon eloquently and at some length by Mr. J. A. Mulligan, counsel for accused. Magistrate Brodie also turned a deaf ear to this plea.

But all’s well that ends well, and there is a chance now that kind friends will come to the rescue of the poor, hard-working Augustini and pay his fine, the authorities having agreed to a recess until Saturday next.

THREE MEN AND A GIRL
A pretty, young French-Canadian girl of eighteen summers, Cecile Gatien, who originally hails from Montreal and has been in these parts but two weeks, was found in a house Saturday night with three Austrians. Provincial Constable Grassick was out that way on another mission Saturday night last when three autos in front of the house attracted his attention. All lights had been darkened on the autos and he was unable to secure numbers as they scurried away. There is a suspicion that they were licensed jitneys. Several complaints about the house have been made to the police.

Two of the men came from Murray Mine and for that reason the charge of leaving their place of residence without the permission of the police failed. The magistrate held that as there was no registrar at Murray Mine, and as Stobie and Murray are in the same municipality, this charge could not succeed. The third young foreigner, however, come from Garson, which made $10 and costs difference.

On a charge of being frequenters of a house of ill fame and three men pleaded guilty and paid $10 and costs.

The young girl pleaded guilty to being a keeper, her counsel asking a week’s remand, which was granted. She has a lover, a young Italian, it is understood, who is willing to go to the altar with the erring girl, and in case the marriage materializes the leniency of the court for a chance to make good will be asked.

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