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Posts Tagged ‘immigration to canada’

George Meeres, “Road building at Mara Lake [British Columbia] by prisoners of war [sic. interned enemy aliens].” Black and white photograph, 1916. Enderby Museum, #3377

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“Jail and the Workingman.” Kingston Daily Standard. Editorial. October 9, 1912. Page 04.

According to the annual return of Governor Corbett, of the county jail, there was a total of 162 prisoners committed during the year ending the 30th September 1912, of whom eight were females. The occupations of these prisoners were: Baker, 1; blacksmith and boilermaker, 1; bricklayers, 1; butchers, 1; cabinet makers, 5; carpenters, 8; cigar makers, 2; clerks, 1; engineers, 1; farmers, 3; hotelkeepers, 1; laborers, 109; masons, 1; moulders, 2; painters, 2; sailors, 1; servants, 6; teamsters, 1; tinsmiths, 1; woodworkers, 1; no occupation, 7; soldiers, 2.

In looking over these figures one is at once struck with the large number of laborers, 109, as against 49 of all other occupations. Two-thirds of the whole number are laborers. It may be said that laborers constitute the majority of working people and for that reason the proportion constitute the majority of working people and for that reason the proportion is not out of the way. That probably is true, but laborers do not make up two-thirds of the population of Kingston, and there are not 109 times as many laborers as there are bakers, or blacksmiths, or clerks or engineers or masons; for we find only one of each of these classes of workmen in jail during the year. The number of laborers imprisoned is clearly out of all proportion to their number in the community.

Only one explanation can be offered for this condition of affairs. A lack of education is at the bottom of it. A boy who is allowed to drift through school and leave it at an early age and is then placed at some work which leads to no trade, business or profession lands among the class of laborers when he reaches man’s estate. He is without a trade or business training and almost always without education except the merest rudiments of it.

The parent who thus neglects his child, who fails to make him attend school or who does not send him to learn a trade or business is almost criminally blameworthy. In Canada there is no excuse for allowing any boy to drift into the class of laborers. Here, there is every chance for any boy to get a fair education or to learn a trade. In the first place, it is the fault of his parents, in 99 cases out of a hundred if the boy does not get that chance; in the second place it is the fault of the State for for not passing and enforcing such laws as will compel the parents to look to the welfare of their children by seeing either that they are properly educated for the professions or are taught a business or trade. Our foreign immigration will provide us with all the laborers we need; it is a disgrace to Canada to have any of her sons among the class of criminal laborers, not because labor is not honourable, but because the people of Canada should be educated to work of a higher nature than that of the mere laborer.

The statistics furnished by Governor Corbett shows that of the 162 prisoners, 12 are Canadians – that is just 112 too many.

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“Two Prisoners for Pen.” Kingston Daily Standard. October 8, 1912. Page 08.

Deputy Sheriff Jarvis, Toronto, arrived in the city on Saturday afternoon with two prisoners for the penitentiary. They were Bernard McMahon, who will serve three years for assault, and Harry Beatty, who will serve the same length of time for theft.
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“Italian Sent Down.” Kingston Daily Standard, October 8, 1912. Page 08.

An Italian, Rocco Lombardo, was sentenced to two and a half years in Portsmouth Penitentiary for a vicious assault on two fellow country-men at Toronto. Both the injured men were in court and exhibited the marks of the wounds which had been inflicted.

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“Convict Deported,” Kingston Daily Standard. September 7, 1912. 

A convict in the penitentiary named Jenkins, who had been sent down for theft in Seaforth, Ont., was yesterday deported to England, by Immigration Inspector Devlin.

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“Dom. Police To Stand Trial On Robbery Charge,” Sudbury Star. August 10, 1918. Page 08.

Officers Attached to Local Squad Out on $1,500 Bail Each

The preliminary trials of W. H. Good and F. W. Thompson, Dominion Police stationed at Sudbury and charged with robbing three Austrians of the sum of $95 on the evening of Friday, August 2, were heard in Sudbury police court Wednesday morning and afternoon. Magistrate Brodie, after hearing the crown`s witnesses committed the prisoners to stand trial at the next jury sitting of the Supreme Court, December 2nd. Bail was fixed at $1,500 for each prisoner, $1,000 of their own recognizance, and two sureties of $500 each. Charles Taylor, of Sudbury, is the bondsman. The officers have been suspended from the service.

The first witness to tesity, Evan Slobodan, an Austrian, a laborer on the C.P.R., living in a boarding car, indentified the prisoners, saying that they were the men who on Friday, August 2, came to his car about six o`clock, and started to look through his belongings. When asked to show their badge the policemen did so. Officer Good then felt his pockets and told him to lay his belt on the table, the belt containing a bank book and $140, after which Good told him to show him the contents of his grip at the other end of the car. In the meantime Thompson was counting over the money in the belt. At this juncture, according to the evidence, Good picked up a dagger on the table and asked the Austrian for his papers, but before he could produce them the officers left the car. Slobodian immediately counted his money and discovered that two ten dollar bills and four five dollar bills, $40 in all, was missing. About nine o’clock he complained to the police and accompanied them until the accused were found in Taylor’s pool room.

L. Ardrechich, another witness, in giving evidence said he was stopped by the Dominion policemen in the same care, but that after making him take off his belt and counting the money they handed it all back to him. Asked by the Crown if he was asked for any papers, witness stated that he was not. The only thing that the officers had told him was that he would have to appear in court for having so much money on him. After Good and Thompson left the car he knew nothing more of the happenings until a constable told him to come down to the police station. That was about nine o’clock the same evening.

PUT UP YOUR HANDS.
Steve Dedick looks after the lights on the switches in the C.P.R. yards and claimed to have seen accused come out of one of the boarding cars. He met the officers and was told to put up his hands, and while Thompson was searching him, Good put handcuffs on him. They then told him to take them to the car. Upon reaching the car Thompson took the money out of his pocket and then he was told to unlock the car door. On arriving inside the car, Good asked Dedick to show him his valise, and it was while searching this that Good told Thompson to take $40 out of teh $70 they had taken from Dedik’s pocket. Witness was told to be in the car at 11 o’clock that night as he would have to appear in court, but when they went outside he was told that if he would give ten dollars more it wouldn’t be necessary to appear in court. Witness made no complaint and said nothing about the incident until about ten o’clock Friday night, when a constable came for him and asked him to go to the police station, when he saw Good and Thompson.

The court then adjourned until two o’clock in the afternoon when Metro Cosczuk, another witness, also identified the prisoners as the men he had seen when he entered Dedik’s car on Friday last. Witness said the officers felt his pockets and asked him if he had any knives or guns and after being told that he hadn’t, they told him to stay in the car until they got out.

Steve Maszuk’s story did not throw any new light on the affair other than he had $75 on his person, but was not searched. Before the accused left, they asked him if he knew if any of his partners had any guns or knives.

SERGT. SCOTT’S EVIDENCE.
Sergt. Short testified that about nine o’clock on August 2, Solbodian came to the police station and laid a complaint that he had been robbed and described the men. A search was started and at the post office corner he met constable White and instructed him to go with Slobodian and search the hotels and pool rooms, after which the witness went up to the C.P.R. station. It was while at the C.P.R. station with Chief Brown that constable White had made an arrest. On his return to the police station Sergt. Scott assisted Chief Brown search Good and Thompson. They found $94.75 on the former, and a revolvver, and $4.00 on the latter. Handcuffs were also found on both men.

THE ARREST.
Constable White told of meeting Sergt. Scott and being told to search the various pool rooms and hotels and told how Slobodian had picked out the prisoners in Taylor’s pool room.

Chief Brown stated that he was present when the search of the prisoners was made and that when he asked them where they got the money, Good replied that it was his pay as a Dominion policeman and some pension money.               

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“Sudbury Police Court,” Sudbury Star. August 10, 1918. Page 05.

Magistrate Brodie intimated in Friday morning’s court that from now on he was going to fine all alien enemies for not carrying papers and Mich. Radomski and D. Mumylyk, hailing from Romford, paid ten dollars and costs for failing to have received permission to come to Sudbury.

IN WRONG, SURE.
Peter Yabokoski was found in an intoxicated condition at the C.P.R. depot Thursday night and when he was searched it was discovered that he had left his papers in a grip at Murray Mine where he had been working. It cost him $10 and costs his fount of joy, and five and costs for not having his papers.

PREVIOUS RECORD COUNTED.
Leon  Michiniowicz was charged with not being employed at a useful occupation on the 9th day of July. He stated that he had worked at the Mond smelter at Coniston but had left owing to ‘his work injuring his health.’ At the time of his arrest he was learning to run a jitney car and at the preent has a jitney. His worship in dismissing the case gave Michniowicz a chance, seeing that he had worked at the smelter five years.

ALLOWED TO GO.
Jules Chalifoux, who was arrested sometime ago for stealing a sum of money on the 3rd of July was allowed to go Friday, owing to the fact that the plaintiff in the charge cannot be located.

A Conistion party appeared Thursday morning to have a family quarrel straightened out. Peter Petryna claimed that Tomas Bilyj had trhown a bottle at him and struck him on the back as he was removing some cases which Bilyj had thrown on the defendant’s property. Much abusive language was exchanged reflecting on both families and the complaint was laid as a result. Magistrate Brodie told the parties interested that the affair was a small thing, expressing a hope that they would go back and live in harmony with one another, and try to patch up there differences. Bilyj was fined $1 and costs.

$200 AND COSTS.
On Wednesday, Alex. Juval requested the court to let his charge of having liquor in other than a private dwelling stand over until Thursday morning, and after having slept over it, he pleaded guilty to the charge and paid $200 and costs.

CASE DISMISSED.
The charge against E. Waugh of having more than fifteen days’ supply of flour on hand was dismissed on Thursday, as the court was convinced that he did not have an over supply of flour at one time. In fact, evidence was brought forward to the effect that it would only last him about fifteen days.

THREE STAR BRANDY
When Nathaniel James was told that he was charged with being drunk he pleaded guilty and told his Worship that he was drinking Three Star brandy. It cost Nat. $10 and costs, and he was told that if he didn’t leave the stars alone it would be a prison term next time.

TOOK CHANCE
Horace Chamberlain admitted that he was in a hurry and that he passed a standing street car while pasengers were alighting.

‘If you are willing to take those chance it will cost you $5 and costs,’ said his Worshhip.

BACK AGAIN
Hilda Maki, Coniston, after having just been released from the reformatory, again appeared at the court Thursday. The magistrate did not read any charge against the woman, but remanded her to enable two physicians to examine her and ascertain the condition of her mental faculties.

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“Inspector Was Done To Death,” Kingston Daily Standard. July 26, 1912. Page 01.
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H. G. Herbert Refused Crippled Alien Admittance to Canada.

WAS SHOT FOUR TIMES

Every Bullet Lodged in Victim’s Head – Tragedy Occurred on Ferry at Windsor.

Windsor, July 26 – H. G. Herbert, of Ottawa, travelling immigration inspector for the Dominion Government, was shot and instantly killed yesterday afternoon by a crippled alien, to whom he had refused admittance to Canada.

Wm. Ferguson, a Scotchman, was the murderer. He shot Herbert when the latter was crossing the river to Detroit, firing four bullets. Every shot lodged in the inspector’s head, causing immediate death. The shooting occurred on the ferry boat Excelsior shortly after the boat had pulled away from the Canadian shore.

The murderer was arrested in Detroit, and held by the police.

Ferguson was not in the custody of Herbert but the latter had been present when Ferguson was questioned and told that he would have to return to the United States because of physical trouble. He has but one leg. Herbert happened to take the same boat back to Detroit with Ferguson, and when the latter recognized him, he instantly drew his revolver and shot him dead.

Ferguson broke down last night and compared himself to Cain that murderer of his brother and pleaded for forgiveness. He says it was in the moment of rash passion that he killed Herbert. It is probable the trial will be in Detroit as the murder was committed on the United States side of the imaginary line. Canadian authorities may drop the extradition proceedings with this development.

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