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Posts Tagged ‘kingston penitentiary’

“Convict’s Thrilling Escape: Leaps From Fast Train,” Toronto Globe. November 25, 1918. Page 08.

Man With Bad Record in Toronto Fools County Constable and Flees Near Shannonville – Recaptured at Napanee

John Gowans, who was on his way to Kingston penitentiary, where he was to commence a second five-year sentence for housebreaking, escaped from the custody of County Constable Frank Brown near Shannonville on Saturday morning. Gowans made his escape by obtaining permission to go to a lavatory, and then by leaping from the window of the train after he had slammed the door upon Constable Brown.

Gowans was the housebreaker who entered the house of the widow of the late Dr. Fenton, and assaulted her when she endeavored to hold him until the arrival of police. He was later arrested, and only recently completed his sentence. Judge Winchester on Wednesday sentenced Gowans to five years’ imprisonment upon convictions registered against him for housebreaking in Parkdale.

The convict was recaptured at Napanee on Saturday just before midnight.

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“Jack Lett Is Given Ten Years In Prison,” Toronto Star. November 22, 1918. Page 02.

Canadian Express Co. Robber Also Pleads Guilty to Robbing Union Bank.

Jack Lett, the embryo highwayman who robbed the Canadian Express Co. of $20,000 on October 23, was to-day given ten years in the penitentiary. He withdrew his plea of not guilty and pleaded guilty to robbing the Union Bank and stealing an automobile. For these crimes he also received five and three years respectively. The sentences are to run concurrently.

His brother, Walter Lett, also withdrew his plea of not guilty and pleaded guilty to having received $1,000, which he knew to be stolen. This money he gave to his wife. He was let go on remanded sentence provided he gives $1,000 security and finds two other securities of $1,000 each.

James Gordon Dougall is to spend not less than one year and not more than two years in the Ontario Reformatory.

In addressing Jack Lett, Chief Justice Meredith said: ‘I have no desire to add to the severity of your sentence by lecturing you. I regret that I have no testimony as to your mental capabilities, so I must judge you as I have seen you. The main trouble with you seems to be inordinate vanity. In opening your case your counsel has pictured you as a pigeon-chested, varicose-veined misfit, who is undeveloped both physically and mentally.

Looking Into the Future.
‘Your picture of yourself is that of a bold highwayman. It is to cure you of this delusion that you are to be disciplined. If you were allowed to go free that gun of yours might go off some time, and then some judge would be talking about Jack Lett being hanged by the neck until he was dead.

‘If there had only been a ‘man’ in that express car who would have given you a good thrashing, taken away your pistol, and thrown you out you would have been cured. The only thing to do now is to seek to cure you by the panacea of hard labor.

‘Jack Lett, you were not made for a highwayman. You were given freedom of that express car. Afterwards you went wandering about like a frightened child, and impressed the first man whom you met as a thief. Moreover you left your plunder right under the very nose of those who suspected you. 

‘Walter Lett, you certainly did not do all you could to save your brother, and let me tell you the offence to which you plead guilty is a serious one.

Severe Words For Dougall.
‘James Gordon Dougall, your case has caused me a deal of thought. You were the chief clerk, you held a responsible position, and you can understand that your connection with this crime will cast suspicion upon your associates and inferiors. You were leading a disgraceful life. Don’t you think one should be horsewhipped for a life of that kind.

‘You were found guilty of the lesser offence, but a jury might well have found you the instigator in this farce.’

All the prisoners refused to say anything in their defence, and received their sentences in silence.

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“Fifteen Years’ Imprisonment,” Toronto Globe. November 11, 1918. Page 09.

Stiff Sentence Is Imposed Upon Giovanni di Francesco

Two Others Announced

Giovanni di Francesco, found guilty of manslaughter in connection with the death of Dominic Zangarie, whom he admitted killing on a plea of self-defense, was on Saturday sentenced by Mr. Justice Riddell to fifteen years’ imprisonment.

William Nicholls, who pleaded guilty of doing grievous bodily harm to Martha Hassal, was sentenced to ten years in the penitentiary. Nicholls had been released on parole from penitentiary, where he was serving a term of two years for housebreaking. The unexpired term will run concurrently with his ten-year sentence. As the prisoner left the dock, his young wife, who was sitting in the court, on failing to attract his attention, fainted, and had to be carried out.

Everett Struit, who was charged with Nicholls, and whom the jury found guilty of attempting to do bodily harm to Martha Hassal, was sentenced to eighteen months in the Ontario Reformatory.

Two Years for Pearsall
William Pearsall, found guilty of criminal negligence arising out of the death of Joseph Hughes, who was killed when the car which Pearsall was driving turned over on Danforth avenue last July, was sentenced to two months [sic] in the penitentiary.

In announcing the sentence, his Lordship declared that the driving of motor cars by men under the influence of liquor must stop. ‘It is bad enough,’ he continued, ‘to be at the mercy of those naturally reckless or too young to be in charge of motors without having men under the influence of liquor driving through our streets. You were guilty of manslaughter, but I am not going to whack the jury over your shoulders because of their mistaken clemency.’

‘There is no law that allows a man to drive fifteen miles an hour,’ said Mr. Justice Riddell Saturday, on postponing sentence on Norman Cowie for a week in order that more inquiries might be made. ‘The law says he must not exceed fifteen miles an hour, but in some cases that is too fast. Auto drivers must think.’

Cowie was found guilty of criminal negligence in connection with the death of Sarah Livingstone, who was run down and killed by his motor car.

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“Is Sentenced For Stabbing,“ The Globe and Mail. October 25, 1938. Page 03.

Sudbury, Oct. 24 (Special). – The sequel to a stabbing affray at Capreol last June, in which William Burman, 46, met his death at the hands of Steve Masluk, Ukrainian lumberjack, was written in supreme court here today when Mr. Justice J. McTague sentenced the accused to two years and six months in Portsmouth penitentiary.

A murder charge against Masluk was reduced to manslaughter after the evidence was heard last week.

Mr. Justice McTague pointed out that although manslaughter carried a term of life imprisonment, he was inclined to be lenient as Burman was the aggressor in all fights of which evidence had been given.

‘I think you might have been provoked to the point of drawing a knife, but that is one thing you must learned, the use of knives cannot be tolerated in this country.’

The supreme court justice dated the sentence from the time of Masluk’s arrest on June 7, the day the stabbing took place.

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“Gets 2 Years For Holdup Of Taximan,” The Globe and Mail. October 25, 1938. Page 03.

Sentence for Robbery With Violence Runs Concurrently With 10-Year Term Already Imposed

One Man Still Sought

Sudbury, Oct. 24 (Special). – With five police officers present in the courtroom, Maurice Fisette, 27, one of the trio who on Oct. 2, held up and robbed Tom Campbell, Sudbury taxi driver, pleaded guilty to the theft of a car and robbery with violence. He was sentenced to two years in Portsmouth penitentiary on each charge, the sentences to run concurrently.

Fisette accepted his sentence, without giving any clue as the identity of the third man who is still at liberty. Harold Olsen, a member of the trio, was struck by a police bullet which glanced off a rock, as police attempted to apprehend the men about 100 miles west of Sudbury. Olsen died in the Red Cross Hospital at Blind River the following day. At the inquest which followed Constable J. Brown, who fired the fatal bullet, was absol;ved of all blame in connection with the bandit’s death.

Before sentence was pased FIsette asked ‘for a chance to go straight.’ He told Magistrate J. S. McKessock he already had a ten-year sentence to serve and pleaded for leniency ‘to give me time to get out and go straight.’ Magistrate McKessock expressed the opinion in passing sentence Fisette had ‘already wasted your opportunities.’

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“Convict at Pen Attempts Escape,” Kingston Daily Standard. October 12, 1912. Page 01.

Chartrand, Insane, Made a Futile Try.

Discovered by Guard Ryan Half Way Through Cell Door – Got Away Last Spring.

Chas. Chartrand, the prisoner who last spring escaped from the Penitentiary and was caught a week later near Brockville, this morning made an unsuccessful attempt to escape, being discovered by Guard Ryan, half way through the bars in his cell door Chartrand is a lifer and has been confined to the insane ward for about six years. He is serving a life sentence for shooting a policeman in Sault Ste. Marie.

The prisoner’s mode of breaking prison was most ingenious. He had secreted a piece of string and a piece of emery stone, and with these and a few pieces of metal, had sawn through several of the bars in his cell. The guard discovered him when he was half through the door. He was captured and placed in a stronger cell.

Chartrand had served about 12 years in the penitentiary, according to one of the prison officials, his whole mind seems centered an escaping, and the guards must be watching him all the time in order to prevent him from breaking away.

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“Has Begun Ten-Year Term.” Kingston Daily Standard. October 11, 1912. Page 08.

John W. Marshall arrived on Thursday afternoon from Sault Ste-Marie to commence his ten-year term at the penitentiary for assaulting his daughter. The prisoner says he was drunk when the offence was committed.

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“Acquitted of Murder,” Kingston Daily Standard. October 11, 1912. Page 04.
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James Bruce Found Not Guilty in Hamilton Poison Case.

Hamilton, Ont., October 11. – The jury in the case of James Bruce, charged with murdering Rose Ziepe, by means of poisoned candies, which the Crown alleged he had given to his wife while she was a patient in the hospital, found a verdict of not guilty, last night.

Before discharging Bruce, Justice Kelly lectured him on his evident neglect of his wife. ‘I have no fault to find with the verdict, but the jury might reasonably have found you guilty of the charge against you,’ said his lordship to the prisoner.
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Not Confined in ‘Pen.’

A despatch from Detroit states that a Petrolea woman accuses her husband, ‘Jack’ Watson, of an attempt to poison her, and further states that at the time she was married to Watson, he was a paroled prisoner having served time at the Portsmouth Penitentiary for robbery. On enquiry at the penitentiary to-day, The Standard was informed that the man in question has not been confined at the penitentiary.

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“Prison Terms Are Meted Out,” Hamilton Spectator. October 8, 1938. Page 01.

Three Years For Costello, Two For MacAvella Imposed By Court

A
total of six years in prison terms was imposed on three men who
appeared before three men who appeared before Judge Ernest F. Lazier in
county criminal court Friday afternoon.

Frank Costello, aged 21,
one of a family of seven children, was sentenced to three years in
Kingston penitentiary when he pleaded guilty to four charges of theft of
automobiles.

Douglas MacAvella was sentenced to two years in
Kingston penitentiary when he was convicted of the theft if six auto
batteries from the Super-Lastic Sales corporation. He was acquitted of
the theft of an automobile.

Albert Peddie was given a one-year
term sentence for theft imposed in magistrate’s court, when Judge Lazler
convicted him of breaking into the garage of Robert McKee, Cannon street
and Sanford avenue, and the theft of electric drills and other tools
from it.

Appearing for Costello, Joseph D. Sullivan said he had a
‘heart to heart’ talk with him at the jail, but could only account for
his misdemeanours by his disposition toward recklessness.

‘I agree
with Mr. Sullivan that a reformatory term would have no effect in
redeeming him’ said George W. Ballard, K.C., crown attorney, handing
Costello’s record card to the judge.

Detective Albert Speakman
testified as to auto thefts in August and September when cars were stolen
belonging to James Ray, Grimsby Beach; Hertbert Ticker, Toronto; Harold
Jaggard, Cathcart street, and R. A. Bergdorf, York street.

Car Smashed
Mr. Tucker’s car was found near Dunnville badly smashed, Detective Speakman told the court.

Called
by the crown to testify in the MacAvella case, two young women and a
young man who were playing tennis on the courts of the First United
church, said they saw the accused carry batteries and place them in a
car on August 26. Judge Lazier found there was insufficient evidence to
justify his conviction for auto theft.

MacAvella denied theft of
the batteries, and added he had obligingly thrown back two tennis balls to
the young people who had testified against him.

In Peddie’s case,
Detective Speakman told of stopping the accused in his car, finding a
wrecking bar, hacksaw, tools and a large pair of snips. Robert McKee,
proprietor of a garage which was broken into, identified some of the
tools by his initials on them.

MacAvella and Peddie were without
counsel. Both had records. The convicted trio were led from the court
room, their hands manacled together.

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“Two Prisoners for Pen.” Kingston Daily Standard. October 8, 1912. Page 08.

Deputy Sheriff Jarvis, Toronto, arrived in the city on Saturday afternoon with two prisoners for the penitentiary. They were Bernard McMahon, who will serve three years for assault, and Harry Beatty, who will serve the same length of time for theft.
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“Italian Sent Down.” Kingston Daily Standard, October 8, 1912. Page 08.

An Italian, Rocco Lombardo, was sentenced to two and a half years in Portsmouth Penitentiary for a vicious assault on two fellow country-men at Toronto. Both the injured men were in court and exhibited the marks of the wounds which had been inflicted.

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“Escaped from Burwash; Sent To Kingston,” Ottawa Standard. October 8, 1918.

Two Young Men Start Early on Downward Career.

Sentences of two years in Kingston penitentiary were meted out to two young men, Joseph Claro and Norman G. Williams, who pleaded guilty in Tuesday’s police court to escaping from Burwash Industrial Farm. The two seemed thoroughly repentant for their action, but the court thought that their chances for parole would be better at Kingston than at the institution they had just left.

Young in Crime
Norman Williams is but 20 years of age. He was sentenced at Toronto to serve a term for the theft of an automobile. On the 24th of September he escaped from custody and when caught was taken back with just a warning. On October 4th, he escaped again in company of Joseph Claro, alias Joseph Cleroux. This man has a bad record, with a previous term at the penitentiary, time in local jails and a reform school, and a lengthy sentence at Burwash ahead before his elopment. He and Williams escaped from the Industrial Farm, made their way along the rail line, evading the guards searching for them, and absconding with a motor car in Copper Cliff….
[damage in original]
….consecutively with the sentences they were serving.

‘Notwithstanding your youthfulness you are dangerous characters to be at large, and if I send you to Kingston Penitentiary I think they will be able to help you there,’ Magistrate Askwith declared.

Their recapture Tuesday afternoon was effected by Inspector Joliet and his squad after an exciting chase through New Edinburgh. Shots were fired by the detectives.

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“Comes to the Pen,” Kingston Daily Standard. October 5, 1912. Page 03.

Troubles of a Man Who Stole to Pay Wedding.

Windsor, Ont., Oct. 5. – A month ago Charles H. Doss, aged 22, of Leamington, stole $80 from his former employer, in order to marry Miss Grace Dodge, of Leamington. The wedding took place and the young couple went to Detroit, to live. A week after the ceremony Doss was arrested for theft, brought back to Windsor and committed for trial.

Yesterday he was arraigned before Mr. Justice Britton at the Sandwich assizes, found guilty and sentenced to two years in Portsmouth.

Doss was without counsel. His bride, who is but 19 years old, was not in court, and her parents say she will have nothing more to do with him after his release.
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“Bad Prisoner Arrives.” Kingston Daily Standard. October 5, 1912. Page 03.
—-
Dr. Webster, Sheriff of the County of Halton, and A. W. Gallop, arrived in the city last night with John Laird, who will spend two years and one day in the penitentiary for house-breaking. The prisoner, a young man 20 years of age has a bad record and has served several terms in jail and six in Central Prison. He was kept in the police station over night and taken to the penitentiary this morning.

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“Sinn Feiner Gets 15 Years In Prison,” Toronto Globe. September 28, 1918. Page 07.

J. E. Plant’s Sentence Of Death Is Commuted – ‘Conchy’ Given 10 Years.

(Canadian Press Despatch.)
Niagara Camp, Sept. 27. – The first drafted man in camp to be sentenced to death by the general court-martial is John Edward Plant of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Central Ontario Regiment, whose sentence was promulgated this afternoon at a garrison parade. His sentence, however, has been commuted to fifteen years’ imprisonment in the penitentiary at Kingston, and this was read at the promulgation by Captain Roy Parke, Adjutant of the 2nd Battaltion, 2nd C.O.R. Plant is a Sinn Feiner, and refused to perform military service in any capacity.

Johnston Marks of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd C.O.R., who is a conscientious objector and refused to put on uniform, was sentenced to penitentiary for ten years.

Col. K. I. McLaren, Camp Commandant, was in charge of the parade for the promulgation of the sentences.

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“Inside Kingston Penitentiary – Ten Years After Canada’s Most Infamous Prison Riot,” Saturday Night. September 1981. Pages 34 & 35.

Part onePart two.

.

 

TERRY Decker, Thirty-Six, Was Attacked and Taken Hostage During The 1971 riot. ‘First they moved us into an air duct. They kept us there for a couple of hours. Then they started locking us away, three to a cell. They made us take off our uniforms and put on inmate clothing. They figured there wouldn’t be any trouble if the people outside didn’t know who was an inmate and who wasn’t. They moved us every couple of hours from one range to another. I don’t know if they did it to confuse our guys, or the inmates who might have wanted to get at us.’

The hostages were treated with an unpredictable mixture of violence and consideration. ‘I was punched pretty good,’ says Decker. ‘They flattened a disc in my back and burst a blood vessel in my eyeball.’ At the same time, he and the other hostages were given double rations. ‘If the inmates got one sandwich, we got two. And tobacco – we had more than we could ever have smoked. I have no complaints there.’ Decker was released as a show of good faith during the negotiations. He’d been held for forty hours. ‘As I was coming out, one lifer said to me, ‘It pays not to be a dog, eh?’

Four months after the incident, he returned to work. He required extensive physiotherapy and cortisone shots in the spine, but since 1973 his health has been sound. Of the six guards held hostage, Decker is the only one who still works in security – he’s now at Collins Bay penitentiary. Two of the hostages have died; one quit; one took a medical pension; one works as a groundskeeper at Millhaven. Only a portion of the prison has been restored. Several ranges have never been reopened, and the top two tiers of the functioning ranges remain sealed off. Prior to posing for this photograph, Decker had not set foot in the part of the prison where he was held hostage since the riot ten years ago. ‘I was in fear for my life all the time.’

‘THERE’S No Call For This Trade Outside,’ Says The Instructor In the Mail bag repair shop, where these inmates were photographed during a coffee break, ‘but it helps the guys do their time and provides a few dollars for upkeep.’ Last year inmates in the shop repaired five thousand bags a week. The penitentiary earns a dollar for each mailbag it repairs, but eighty four cents goes to materials. Work programmes at Kingston – like hobby and recreational activities – are curtailed by outdated facilities. The only work of rehabilitative value is data processing. Inmates are coding the records of the National Museum of Science and Technology into computer banks. ‘We’re going to get a lot more terminals,’ says Andrew Graham, the warden. ‘It’s a popular programme, and it’s a skill that’s very much in demand on the street.’

Inmates used to be paid a pittance. Last May, however, the federal pay scale was revised to coincide with civilian minimum wage rates, less the eighty-five percent of income that Statisticcs Canada calculates a single man would spend on food, lodging, and clothes. Depending on the nature of his work, a prisoner in a federal institution came between $3.15 and $5.90 a day in maximum security, $3.70 and $6.45 in medium, and $4.80 and $7.55 in minimum. Twenty-five per cent of his pay is withheld as compulsory savings. An inmate serving a lengthy sentence now has the opportunity of returning to civilian life with a few thousand dollars, rather than a few hundred.

There are good reasons for the graduate pay scale. The first is the cost of incarceration. To keep an inmate in maximum security costs $35,800 a year, versus $22,600 for medium security and $18,400 for minimum. (In a community correctional centre – where inmates work at civilian jobs and return to custody each night – the cost is $11,500. The cost of parole is $1,600 a year.) The graduated pay scale also encourages inmates to behave well in order to qualify for an institution with a lower security rating – and a higher pay scale.

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“Maj.-Gen. Logie Inspects Troops,” Toronto Globe. September 25, 1918. Page 11.

Railway Const. Draft Going Shortly – Another Death From Spanish ‘Flu.’

(Canadian Press Despatch.)
Niagara Camp, Sept. 24. – Major-Gen. W. A. Logie, G.O.C., came over from Toronto this morning accompanied by Major G. G. Mitchell, and inspected a draft of railway troops that is going to leave camp shortly.

Another death was added last night to the fatalities which have occurred in the Polish camp from Spanish influenza, this making a total of six deaths from the epidemic.

There were about 200 cases of Spanish influenza in the Polish army yesterday, but this number was reduced to-day by discharges of 185.

Pte. John Joseph Noonan of the 2nd Battalion, Central Ontario Regiment, who deserted from a draft while in Toronto on the way east on July 27, and was apprehended on August 31st, in Toronto, was sentenced by district court martial here to Kingston Penitentiary for two years, and was taken to Kingston this morning.

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