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Posts Tagged ‘le petit journal’

“C’est là
que se sont réfugiés les fous criminels! / Du Nouveau Dans L’Affaire Des Fous Criminels,” Le Petit Journal. September 18, 1938. Pages 1 & 2.

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“La technocratie serait  le règne des ingénieurs / Le negre assassin avait deja commis deux attentats,” Le Petit Journal. January 29, 1933. Page 05.

A story about the glory of technocracy – very popular in Québec at the time – and a murder story about Lloyd Price.

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“La ‘Femme-aux-Trois-Mains’ Opere A Montreal,” Le Petit Journal. December 4, 1932. Page 01 & 03.

Story about the ‘three-handed woman’, a pick-pocket scam operating in department stores that had just recently arrived in Montreal.

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“St-Vincent-De-Paul??/Confidentiel!/Au Penitencier de St-Vincent-De-Paul: Les Vrais Motifs de la Revolte.” Le Petit Journal, November 13, 1932. Page 1 & Page 20.

As always, the hebdomadaire tabloids are the most ‘colourful’ in their coverage. The cover story, and the addendum tucked in the bottom left, is about an old convict of the federal prison in Laval, St-Vincent-De-Paul, coming forward anonymously to explain the ‘real reasons’ of the revolt. Again, Chester Crossley, here identified as ‘Jazz’ Crossley, a racist and fictional nickname, is identified as the ‘diabolical genius’ behind the revolt. However, the old inmate also mentions the poor food, spoiled milk, and harsh punishments as being key factors in the prisoner revolt.  As a bonus, a story about the capture of Valleyfield bandit Onésime Sauve.

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“CAUSES DE LA RÉVOLTE AU PÉNITENCIER – L’ENQUÊTE EST COMMENCÉ,” Le Petit Journal, November 6, 1932.  Front Page and Page 22, covering speculation and rumour, as well as fact, about the origin, nature, and course of the Saint-Vincent De Paul penitentiary riot.  Typical of Le Petit Journal, the coverage is mostly about themselves.

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“L’homme qui souffrait de la ‘bosse du crime’,” Le Petit Journal, October 20, 1932.  Page 05.

A story relating the case of a Austrian man, Karl Grunsberg, heir of an industrialist family, who as a child was injured and turned criminal – and the Viennese doctor, Herr Fursberger, who used experimental brain surgery to cure him of his criminality.  An article advocating for the mostly discredited by the 19th century theory of the ‘bosse du crime’ – an area of the brain whose prominence was connected to violent or criminal behaviour.

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“Celebre Nageuse, Actrice Et Femme De Lettres,” Le Petit Journal, October 2, 1932. Page 28.  Profile and vaguely sports-related pictures about Annette Kellerman, Australian swimmer, actress, bathing suit designer and writer.

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