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‘Struck His Wife On Busy Street,” Toronto Star. August 16, 1910. Page 02.

Has Been Paying Attention to Another Woman – To Jail for 30 Days.

CASES IN THE POLICE COURT

Doctor Accused of Bigamy – Brothers Charged With Assault and Robbery.

Even from the court room above it became quite apparent that Wm. A. Fulton had radical ideas of his own as to cell decorum. Alternately he addressed fellow-prisoners in ministerial language or spouted poetry, and guffaws could be heard in greeting. Once up he cooled perceptibly.

Constable Reburn had arrested him for disorderly conduct at the station.

‘Shaking people,’ said that officer, and Fulton waits a week for a doctor’s examination.

Herchall Hertz took her insanity conviction badly. She protested, pitifully, so that all might hear, and two constables were needed to take her downstairs.

Mary Greer, aged 80, will go over to the House of Providence.

George Parker and James McDonald, drunken, pay a dollar and costs each.

Told Troubles to Policeman.
Careless of the man he accosted on the street, backed up by a hard luck tale, Philip Martin landed in Esther street police station. Unwittingly he had recounted his need for money to Provincial Constable O’Connor, so the charge was vagrancy.

He is too young in appearance for such a charge, but he pleaded guilty. Besides, he had been seen to follow a drunken man. Ten dollars and costs or 60 days.

Claiming that the gun he left in the Union Station waiting room had disappeared, William McLean, of Midland, on his way to Winnipeg, caused the arrest of Robert Dalton, fellow-traveler from Victoria Harbor. Constable Reburn locked up, for the rifled was found in his possession.

Ignorance of the circumstances was taken as a plea for not guilty.

‘Dalton claimed it at first,’ stated the officer.

Drunkenness was then promptly rung in as an excuse, but Magistrate Denison has heard it many times before, Dalton’s trip will be interrupted. He goes to jail for 30 days.

Accused of Shoplifting.
Nellie Newman, charged with shoplifting from Eaton’s, was remanded till Monday next without plea of election. The articles complained of are, a chatelaine and one lady’s sweater.

For Striking His Wife.
When several pedestrians saw Herbert Foster strike his wife in the face on the street at Yonge and Queen, they gave chase, but Foster boarded a street car and left the woman lying on the street. Detectives Guthrie and Murray came along and followed and arrested him on a charge of aggravated assault. The couple live at 99 Jarvis street.

‘Why?’ questioned Crown Attorney Corley.

‘There’s another woman in the case, and I kept following him.’

‘No, no,’ Foster shook his head.

The wife stated circumstances of their domestic life, which held Foster up to censure and only a threat from the magistrate forced Foster into an admission that the second woman had wrecked the peace of their family. He goes to jail for 30 days.

Farmers at the Market.
The Humber Bay Farmers, E. Powitt, and W. Griggsby, charged with a breach of the law defining the sale of farm produce in that they sold produce on the St. Lawrence Market not in barrels, bags, or bushels, but in broken portions of those measures, were given a second remand. Their counsel, A. R. Hassard, had not yet carried out his intention to go before the Board of Control to ask for a change in the regulation. He stated he would carry his appeal before those officials at today’s meeting.

Will Support Wife.
William Wells named bright prospects. Though he had not yet contributed to the support of the wife, Elizabeth Wells, as stipulated by the court on July 27, he would go out on the road and sell stuff. He is a traveler.

The second chance was given.

Bought the Harness.
To look up the man who sold him the harness parts for 30 cents, Herbert Bennett was given a remand. A witness was produced, who bought the goods from Bennett for eighty cents, and originally they were stolen from J. Battalta. The charge was theft.

On a conviction of gross indecency Charles F. Brown will go to jail for sixty days.

Ethel Gibson was quite frank: she did not deny stealing 5 ½ yards of ribbon from the Jas. Vise Company. It was her first offence. She promised not to repeat it, so a chance was given.

Michael Tellman, convicted of the theft of jewelry from Samuel Siegel, goes to jail for ten days.

Lost a $20 Bill.
David Stein declared he mistook a twenty dollar bill for a two and handed it to Loretta O’Hara in change from his auction mart in Yonge street, so charged her with theft.

But there had been many customers, the girl knew nothing of the twenty, and T. C. Robinette produced her bank book which showed accurate accounting to correspond with her funds. The charge was dismissed.

Doctor on Bigamy Charge.
Though yesterday afternoon when detained by Inspector Kennedy of the Morality Department, on a charge of bigamy, Dr. Herbert Edward Shepherd, who has practised for a number of years at 15 Gloucester street, admitted three marriages, he claimed to be innocent of the bigamy charge, on the grounds that the first marriage had been dissolved, and that he had been separated from the second wife for more than seven years before contracting the third marriage.

Complaint was received rom the first wife, Mabel Louisa Saunders, who was marred in Barrie, 1869, and who is now living a Duck Lake, Sask., with some of their children. It is alleged that in July, 1883, he left her with six children, and that later he married a second time, and that he married Lucy A. Moore of Goderich, in September, 1908. This wife was living with him when the arrest was made.

Normal Heyd, appearing as counsel, pleaded not guilty, and offered as explanation the statement that a divorce had been granted on December 18, 1867, in Michigan, where the doctor was practising at the time.

Crown Attorney Corley merely offered to put in the two marriages certificates as evidence, and Mr. Heyd consented to waive examination of witnesses, and asked to go over before a jury for trial.

The same bail of $1,000, given by Mr. J. Hazelton, stands, and the case will come before the next assizes.

Brothers Accused.
Lords and Abraham Pancer, brothers, of 47 Chesnut street, tailors, were charged with assaulting Arthur Swartz of 122 Edward street, in Edward street Saturday night, and robbing him of $130. The plea was not guilty, no evidence was taken, bail of $200 being accepted for hearing on the 18th.

Complaining there were pickings from the ice wagons, and that an example was necessary, the Belle Ewart Ice Company caused the arrest of Henry Street, a teamster.

‘I took a little that was left over from the route,’ admitted Street, ‘but it went to pay for shoeing the horses, sharpening ice tongs, axe, and to pay for my dinner.’

‘You should have told the company,’ advised the magistrate, but the charge was dismissed.

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“Dom. Police To Stand Trial On Robbery Charge,” Sudbury Star. August 10, 1918. Page 08.

Officers Attached to Local Squad Out on $1,500 Bail Each

The preliminary trials of W. H. Good and F. W. Thompson, Dominion Police stationed at Sudbury and charged with robbing three Austrians of the sum of $95 on the evening of Friday, August 2, were heard in Sudbury police court Wednesday morning and afternoon. Magistrate Brodie, after hearing the crown`s witnesses committed the prisoners to stand trial at the next jury sitting of the Supreme Court, December 2nd. Bail was fixed at $1,500 for each prisoner, $1,000 of their own recognizance, and two sureties of $500 each. Charles Taylor, of Sudbury, is the bondsman. The officers have been suspended from the service.

The first witness to tesity, Evan Slobodan, an Austrian, a laborer on the C.P.R., living in a boarding car, indentified the prisoners, saying that they were the men who on Friday, August 2, came to his car about six o`clock, and started to look through his belongings. When asked to show their badge the policemen did so. Officer Good then felt his pockets and told him to lay his belt on the table, the belt containing a bank book and $140, after which Good told him to show him the contents of his grip at the other end of the car. In the meantime Thompson was counting over the money in the belt. At this juncture, according to the evidence, Good picked up a dagger on the table and asked the Austrian for his papers, but before he could produce them the officers left the car. Slobodian immediately counted his money and discovered that two ten dollar bills and four five dollar bills, $40 in all, was missing. About nine o’clock he complained to the police and accompanied them until the accused were found in Taylor’s pool room.

L. Ardrechich, another witness, in giving evidence said he was stopped by the Dominion policemen in the same care, but that after making him take off his belt and counting the money they handed it all back to him. Asked by the Crown if he was asked for any papers, witness stated that he was not. The only thing that the officers had told him was that he would have to appear in court for having so much money on him. After Good and Thompson left the car he knew nothing more of the happenings until a constable told him to come down to the police station. That was about nine o’clock the same evening.

PUT UP YOUR HANDS.
Steve Dedick looks after the lights on the switches in the C.P.R. yards and claimed to have seen accused come out of one of the boarding cars. He met the officers and was told to put up his hands, and while Thompson was searching him, Good put handcuffs on him. They then told him to take them to the car. Upon reaching the car Thompson took the money out of his pocket and then he was told to unlock the car door. On arriving inside the car, Good asked Dedick to show him his valise, and it was while searching this that Good told Thompson to take $40 out of teh $70 they had taken from Dedik’s pocket. Witness was told to be in the car at 11 o’clock that night as he would have to appear in court, but when they went outside he was told that if he would give ten dollars more it wouldn’t be necessary to appear in court. Witness made no complaint and said nothing about the incident until about ten o’clock Friday night, when a constable came for him and asked him to go to the police station, when he saw Good and Thompson.

The court then adjourned until two o’clock in the afternoon when Metro Cosczuk, another witness, also identified the prisoners as the men he had seen when he entered Dedik’s car on Friday last. Witness said the officers felt his pockets and asked him if he had any knives or guns and after being told that he hadn’t, they told him to stay in the car until they got out.

Steve Maszuk’s story did not throw any new light on the affair other than he had $75 on his person, but was not searched. Before the accused left, they asked him if he knew if any of his partners had any guns or knives.

SERGT. SCOTT’S EVIDENCE.
Sergt. Short testified that about nine o’clock on August 2, Solbodian came to the police station and laid a complaint that he had been robbed and described the men. A search was started and at the post office corner he met constable White and instructed him to go with Slobodian and search the hotels and pool rooms, after which the witness went up to the C.P.R. station. It was while at the C.P.R. station with Chief Brown that constable White had made an arrest. On his return to the police station Sergt. Scott assisted Chief Brown search Good and Thompson. They found $94.75 on the former, and a revolvver, and $4.00 on the latter. Handcuffs were also found on both men.

THE ARREST.
Constable White told of meeting Sergt. Scott and being told to search the various pool rooms and hotels and told how Slobodian had picked out the prisoners in Taylor’s pool room.

Chief Brown stated that he was present when the search of the prisoners was made and that when he asked them where they got the money, Good replied that it was his pay as a Dominion policeman and some pension money.               

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“Sudbury Police Court,” Sudbury Star. August 10, 1918. Page 05.

Magistrate Brodie intimated in Friday morning’s court that from now on he was going to fine all alien enemies for not carrying papers and Mich. Radomski and D. Mumylyk, hailing from Romford, paid ten dollars and costs for failing to have received permission to come to Sudbury.

IN WRONG, SURE.
Peter Yabokoski was found in an intoxicated condition at the C.P.R. depot Thursday night and when he was searched it was discovered that he had left his papers in a grip at Murray Mine where he had been working. It cost him $10 and costs his fount of joy, and five and costs for not having his papers.

PREVIOUS RECORD COUNTED.
Leon  Michiniowicz was charged with not being employed at a useful occupation on the 9th day of July. He stated that he had worked at the Mond smelter at Coniston but had left owing to ‘his work injuring his health.’ At the time of his arrest he was learning to run a jitney car and at the preent has a jitney. His worship in dismissing the case gave Michniowicz a chance, seeing that he had worked at the smelter five years.

ALLOWED TO GO.
Jules Chalifoux, who was arrested sometime ago for stealing a sum of money on the 3rd of July was allowed to go Friday, owing to the fact that the plaintiff in the charge cannot be located.

A Conistion party appeared Thursday morning to have a family quarrel straightened out. Peter Petryna claimed that Tomas Bilyj had trhown a bottle at him and struck him on the back as he was removing some cases which Bilyj had thrown on the defendant’s property. Much abusive language was exchanged reflecting on both families and the complaint was laid as a result. Magistrate Brodie told the parties interested that the affair was a small thing, expressing a hope that they would go back and live in harmony with one another, and try to patch up there differences. Bilyj was fined $1 and costs.

$200 AND COSTS.
On Wednesday, Alex. Juval requested the court to let his charge of having liquor in other than a private dwelling stand over until Thursday morning, and after having slept over it, he pleaded guilty to the charge and paid $200 and costs.

CASE DISMISSED.
The charge against E. Waugh of having more than fifteen days’ supply of flour on hand was dismissed on Thursday, as the court was convinced that he did not have an over supply of flour at one time. In fact, evidence was brought forward to the effect that it would only last him about fifteen days.

THREE STAR BRANDY
When Nathaniel James was told that he was charged with being drunk he pleaded guilty and told his Worship that he was drinking Three Star brandy. It cost Nat. $10 and costs, and he was told that if he didn’t leave the stars alone it would be a prison term next time.

TOOK CHANCE
Horace Chamberlain admitted that he was in a hurry and that he passed a standing street car while pasengers were alighting.

‘If you are willing to take those chance it will cost you $5 and costs,’ said his Worshhip.

BACK AGAIN
Hilda Maki, Coniston, after having just been released from the reformatory, again appeared at the court Thursday. The magistrate did not read any charge against the woman, but remanded her to enable two physicians to examine her and ascertain the condition of her mental faculties.

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“Robbed Visitor, Goes to Prison,” Toronto Star. August 5, 1910. Page 10.

Nine Months for Edward Walsh – The Money Goes Back to His Victim

CASES IN THE POLICE COURT

George Empey Went Back to His Former Boarding House and Stole $42/
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Because the bills found on Edward Walsh corresponded with those taken from Thomas White, a Californian, Walsh will go to the Central for nine months. It was some days ago that the charge was laid. White had been met at the station by two strangers, drinks followed, then he slept in a downtown hotel, and $245 disappeared from his pocket. The bills were on the First National Bank of Los Angles, and $150 of the same bank were found on Walsh by Detective Taylor. White gets the roll of $150.

Irene Britton, convicted as frequenter of a house of ill-fame, was fined ten dollars and costs.

Robbed Former Landlord.
Claiming that Grover Empey went back to his former boarding house, 188 Spadina avenue, entered during the night and stole $42, the proprietor, John Cansaul, pressed the charge against him in this morning’s Police Court.

‘Took it while I was sleeping,’ complained Cansaul, and the young man did not deny it.

He goes to the Central for four months, and any money found goes back to the owner.

Court Visitor Locked Up.
Herscharn Hertz, for many weeks a familiar figure about the court room as spectator, has been taken into custody, and will be examined by a doctor.

Ernest Carter was remanded a week on two charges of theft, $30 from A. E. Hockins, and a gold ring from Mrs. R. J. Moyes. To the theft of the former amount from his employer, the plea was guilty, but the boy’s mother was in court to press for leniency. 

They Were Acquitted.
‘He didn’t say anything to me about borrowing a few feeds of oats,’ said George Brennan, flatly contradicting the story of Ernest Amos, who was charged jointly with Charles Howard with the theft of a bag of eats from George Stevenson.

It was one to one on the evidence, for Howard had not heard the conversation. No records were against the two young men, so the charges were dismissed.

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“An Employment Bureau In Court,” Toronto Star. August 5, 1910. Page 05.

Police Will Probe It – One of the Patrons Says He Was Victimized.

ASSAULT ON A CONSTABLE

Keeps Edward Gibson on Short Fare at the Jail for a Month More.

Before Magistrate Denison to-day John C. Smith and A. C. Dean got $3.05 from him under misrepresentation, so the charge was theft. Dean conducts an employment agency in Front street and Smith stated that he paid over his dollar for registration and the balance represented a single ticket to Dundalk, where he was informed there was plenty of work.

‘Two of us went,’ continued Smith, ‘but when we got there Dean’s agent laughed at us and said there was no work.’

‘Better have that looked into,’ instructed the magistrate. ‘It may be a regular occurrence.’

Mr. Corley agreed, and the case stands for a week until Campbell, the Dundalk representative, may be produced as witness.

Edgar Bunker Acquitted.
Who took the book of tickets from the Toronto Ferry Company’s office is yet unsolved. Edgar Bunker has been acquited. Several days ago he gave the name of Wm. Cunningham as the man who had passed the tickets on to him.

Got them in a lodging house on Pearl street in April,’ explained Cunningham. ‘Somebody put them in my kit.’

He is a fireman on the Richelieu line.

‘It’s quite possible,’ put in Detective Taylor. ‘I know the people who go to the house.’

Accordingly, the charge was dismissed.

Assaulted a Policeman.
For the assault which was made on Constable John Donoghue 28 days ago in Sackville street at night Edward Gibson will go back to jail for 30 days. Donoghue spent several days under medical attention; his ear was badly cut by a bottle. The trouble arose while the officer was arresting William Allen on a charge of disorderly conduct. They resisted, and the damage followed. Allen and two others, Robert Barry and Warren Ellis, were fined $10 and costs each for roughness. Gibson, they identified as the wielder of the bottle. In addition to his 28 days, he will spend 30 more in jail.

For an assault upon Edward Scott, bartender of the Claremont House, John Donohue will go to the jail for 40 days.

Back to Buffalo.
The Buffalonian, J. R. Smith, whom Constable Koster followed through a cellar window at 53 St. George street at five o’clock in the morning a week ago, has promised to vacate Toronto. With a chance, he would go right across the border, for he had only gone in for a sleep. Nothing was missing so the chance was forthcoming.

A Horse in Bad Shape.
Adolphe Meyers will have to submit his horse to a medical examination Constable Carlyle had found the animal suffering and laid a charge of cruelty to animals. The nose, he said, was inflamed, the animal fell down apparently from suffocation, it ‘had been beaten unmercifully,’ and was given no food but grass, which it could not eat on account of the condition of its throat.

Magistrate Denison suggested shooting but a veterinary will be called instead.

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“Copper Cliff Police Court,” Sudbury Star. August 3, 1918. Page 04.

For driving his auto without front lights Negosanti Wario, an Italian, was fined $1 and costs in Wednesday’s police court.

Geo. Lark, of Sudbury, paid $1 and costs for driving his car without a front marker.

Henry Renni, Finlander, also failed to burn two front lights, and paid $1 and costs. The law now is that both lights, not one as formerly, must be burning after dusk.

Richard Death, Sr., charged with having neither front or rear lights, produced a witness, in addition to himself to counteract the evidence of the policeman, and was given the benefit of the doubt by Magistrate Stoddart.

In Friday’s police court, Leone Satore, Italian, drunk in Copper Cliff on July 19th, paid $20 and costs. An analysis of the liquor which proved his undoing, showed it to be 19.87 per pecent. proof spirits, and Crema Mario, the owner, paid $200 and costs for a breach of the O.T.A. in having liquor in other than a private place.

Henry Rintamski, a returned soldier, neglected to burn a rear light on his motor cycle, and was let down with payment of court costs.

P. J. Grenon didn’t have either rear or side lights on his side-car motor cycle. $1 and costs.

Liugi Palma, Italian, parted with $1 and costs for failing to burn front lights.

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“Hold-up Last Night In the C.P.R. Yards,” Sudbury Star. August 3, 1918. Page 01.

About six o’clock Friday night two men entered the boarding car at the C.P.R. coal yard and held up three Austrians at the point of a revolver and relieved them of $50, $40 and $5 respectively, making their getaway.

The Austrians communicated with the police and about 10 o’clock P. C. White arrested W. H. Good and F. W. Thompson, two Dominion policemen in a pool room while engaged in a game of pool.

When charged with robbery on Saturday morning in the police court the two men pleaded not guilty, and were remanded till Monday morning.

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