Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘rural canada’

“Farmer Is Held Up: His Team Taken,” Toronto Globe. August 8, 1918. Page 10.

But the Highway Robbers Are Soon Captured – Boy and Escaped Prisoner.

(Special Despatch to The Globe.)
Brantford, Aug. 7. – John Corton of St. George was held up on the St. George road and his team taken away at the point of a revolver last night. County Constable Taylor and P. C. Thomas went out and in a short time arrested Clarence Brackenbury and a lad named A. Lemon of 17 Able avenue. The latter, being under fourteen years of age, was let go. Brackenbury was remanded this morning for a week. Just prior to being arrested the two were said to be on their way to Waterford. The theft of two bicycles is being charged, as well as carrying concealed weapons and causing damage to schoolhouse property on the St. George road.

Brackenbury is said to be an escaped prisoner from Burwash Farm, having served two months of a year’s sentence before he escaped.

Read Full Post »

“Firemen Labor Under Difficulties,” Montreal Star. July 21, 1938. Page 03.

Ste. Genevieve volunteer firemen worked under difficulties last night when fire threatened the whole village after attacking two dwellings, a general store and several sheds and barns.

The upper picture shows a group of volunteers pouring water onto the smoking ruins.

In the lower picture Fire Chief Poirier and Fireman Brunet are attending to the makeshift pump. The Star photographer caught them as they stood knee-deep in water.

Read Full Post »

“A Beast For The ‘Pen,’” Kingston Daily Standard. May 21, 1912. Page 04.

Farmer Gets Ten Years and Lashes For Abominable Crime.

Woodstock, Ont., May 21 – John R. McKay, a prominent West Zorra farmer, was sentenced yesterday to ten years in the penitentiary, with ten lashes when he goes in and fifteen near the expiration of the sentence, he having been found guilty on a charge preferred by his wife on behalf of her fifteen year old daughter.

McKay swooned when sentenced, and his wife became hysterical. His mother, aged 79, was also in court, and was greatly distressed. The scene was the most affecting ever witnessed here.

S. G. McKay, K. C., counsel for the defence had put up a strong plea, asking for six months in the common jail in view of the prisoner’s luxurious upbringing, and for the sake of his family.

Read Full Post »

“Reeve Weber Heavily Fined,” Toronto Globe. February 25, 1919. Page 02. 

And Gets Month in Jail at Hard Labor for Uttering Sedition

SCATHINGLY DENOUNCED

Magistrate and Judge Alike Rebuke Neustadt German and Warn Him

(Special Despatch to The Globe.)
Owen Sound, Feb. 24 – One month in jail and a fine of $4,500 was the sentence pronounced on Reeve Joseph Weber of Neustadt here to-day. In default of payment of his fine Reever Weber would be imprisoned for three years in the Provincial Penitentiary, but he chose to pay the fine. Besides he has to pay all the costs of the proceedings, amounting to approximately $300.

The trial was held in Owen Sound on February 12 and 13 before Police Magsitrate A. D. Creasor, with N. F. Davidson, K.C., of Toronto, acting for the Crown, and D. O’Connell and F. W. Callaghan of Toronto for the accused.

The charge was laid under the War Measures Act of 1914, whereby Weber was charged with making seditious statements likely to hinder recruiting. It was based on words used by Weber to Arthur Mutton, when he is supposed to have said: ‘The _______ British are licked, and they know it. Before either of my sons go to fight, they will die in the hardware store. If they want any fighting let them come to Neustadt and they will get it.’

Magistrate Creasor found Reeve Weber guilty on this charge and remanded him for sentence. An application for a stated case made by counsel for the accused was withdrawn.

Pleads Guilty on Second Charge
On a second charge before the local Police Court Reeve Weber pleaded guilty to making seditious statements likely to cause disaffection. This also was based on the conversation with Mutton, and on it Weber received a sentence of $4,500 fine and one month in jail, this sentence to be concurrent with the previous one.

In sentencing him Magistrate Creasor said that Reeve Weber was a man born in this country, who had lived here all his life. In times of danger he had used disloyal expressions and had possibly influenced his sons to be disloyal also. When he was through with his sentence the Magistrate hoped that he would remember that everyone living in Canada was supposed to be loyal.

Sentenced Suspended on Other Charge
Reeve Weber also came before Mr. Justice Lennox at the Spring Assizes in Owen Sound this afternoon on four charges. Weber pleaded guilty to one charge and is on suspended sentenced pending his good behavior. The charges against him were the only ones in the docket, and were laid under the Military Service Act.

The first charge was of attempting to resist or impede the operation of the Military Service Act by a written communication to Judge Widdlefield, a member of the local Appeal Tribunal. In this letter Reeve Weber offered to give $500 to patriotic funds if his son, Elmer Joseph Weber, were exempted, and the second charge is of offering a consideration directly or indirectly to a member of an appeal Tribunal. The second indictment was based on written and oral communications by Reeve Weber to secure signatures for his son’s exemption.

Admits Guilt, Stay Granted.
On the first charge of the Widdifield indictment the Grand Jury brought in almost immediately a true bill, and Reeve Weber pleaded guilty. Crown Prosecutor Davidson requested a stay of further proceedings on the second count of this indictment and on the second indictment, and also asked for a suspended sentence. These were granted.

Seething Denunciation.
The denunciation by Mr. Justice Lennox of the Neustadt Reeve was most scathing. He said that disloyalty was one of the gravest offences, and there was no ground or excuse for anyone in Canada being guilty of disloyalty. Reeve Weber was a public man and a leader of the people in his district, yet he was stirring up disloyalty and encouraging his two songs to evade the service of their country. He had also made threats of grave bodily harm. In connection with the war and in defiance of the duties of citizenship, Mr. Justice Lennox said, Reeve Weber displayed some of the worst characteristics of a bad citizen. His father had come to this country to better his condition, and he had prospered here! New citizens were welcomed and encouraged, but they had to behave. The only alternatives were to get in behind the prison bars or to get out of the country. In conclusion the Judge said that if after he was released Reeve Weber was a man of good behavior toward his neighbors and the Corwn his sentence would be suspended. If, however, he showed any intimation of relapsing, he would be brought before a Judge to receive a heavy sentence.

Reeve Most Dejected.
During the rebuke of the Judge Reeve Weber stood in the prisoner’s box with his head bowed, and supported himself with one hand on the railing. He appeared most dejected, both in the Assizes and when receiving his sentence in the Police Court, and his face showed considerable emotion. With hardly a word of his counsel, he was led slowly off to the cells in the county jail.

Read Full Post »

“Reever Weber Again Remanded,” Toronto Globe. February 21, 1919. Page 16.

Stated Case Asked For As A Precedent, To Know If Order Retroactive.

(Special Despatch to The Globe.)
Owen Sound, Feb. 20. – Reeve Joseph Weber of Neustadt was again remanded to Monday next when he came up before Police Magistrate Creasor here this morning. At his trial Tuesday and Wednesday of last week he was found guilty of uttering seditious language and remanded for sentence. On Monday he also appears before Mr. Justice Rose of Toronto at the Assizes in this town on four charges under the War Measures and Military Service Acts.

The reason for the further adjournment was that Weber’s counsel, Messrs. D. O’Connell and F. W. Callaghan of Toronto, have applied for a stated case as a precedent. The proceedings against Weber were under an order in Council, and there is some doubt as to whether it is retroactive or not, for the time for the laying of information was up for some months before this order in Council was passed. Bail was taken for the same sum as before, $10,000 personal bond and two sureties of $5,000 each.

Before the train which Reeve Weber was on arrived in Owen Sound, Mrs. Weber called up Chief of Police Foster on long-distance telephone to ask him to meet the train. The Chief assured her that there would be no recurrence of mob law against Weber here, and that he need not fear as to his personal safety.

Read Full Post »

“At Osgoode Hall,” Toronto Globe. February 20, 1919. Page 07.

JUDGES’ CHAMBERS.
Before Mulock, C.J.

Rex v. Weber – D. O’Connell, for defendant, moved to change place of trial from Owen Sound to such other place as the court may direct. E. Bayly, K.C., for the Attorney-General. Held that the court cannot on the evidence hold that prisoner cannot have a fair trial in Grey, where the jury will be drawn from a large county of some 60,000 population. Motion refused, but without prejudice to an application for change before the trial Judge. No costs.

Read Full Post »

“Pte. Elmer J. Weber Gets 10-Year Term,” Toronto Star. February 5, 1919. Page 04.

Sentence Read Before Battalion at Exhibition Camp To-day.

Standing before his regiment in hollow square and apparently indifferent to his fate, Elmer J. Weber, son of Reever Weber, of Neustadt, Ont., was at the Exhibition Camp today sentenced to ten years servitude on a charge of desertion.

The original sentence passed by the court-martial which took place two weeks ago was fifteen years, but this was reduced by order-in-Council. The sentence was read by Capt. R. A. Plato, Adjutant of the 2nd Battalion, Canadian Garrison Regiment, to which the prisoner belonged. Weber took his sentence without a quiver, and now waits at the Exhibition detention room for the escort to take film to Kingston Penitentiary.

The following is a certified copy of a report of the Committee of the Privcy Council, approved by His Excellency the Governor-General on the 30th January, 1919:

‘The Committee of the Privy Council have had before them a report, dated 27th January, 1919, from the Minister of Militiar and Defence, stating that before a general court-martial held at Torontoon the 14th day of January, 1919, No. 3810998 Private Elmer Joseph Weber, 2nd Battalion, Canadian Garrison Regiment, was tried on the charge of having, when on active service, deserted His Majesty’s service.

Was Flagrant Breach of M.S.A.
‘It appeared from the evidence that this was a particularly flagrant case. The accused lived in a German settlement, and his whole course of conduct from the time the Military Service Act went into operation, indicated determination to evade the military service. He applied for exemption, which was disallowed and appealed. His father, who was in business, with the accused and one other son, got up petitions for his exemption, and under threat of boycott, induced manufacturing firms with which he was dealing, to write to the Military Service authorities on behalf of his son. When exemption was refused, money was furnished the accused whereby he went West and lived there for a long time under an assumed name. He was finally apprehended in the Province of Saaskatchewan. It was clear from the evidence that the accused and his family were the centre of a disloyal German community, and it was a clear case of deliberate desertion. The evidence brought forward on behalf of the accused did not cast any doubt on the truth of the facts above enumerated.’

Reduce Sentence.
‘The court found the accused guilty of the charge, and sentenced him to undergo penal servitude for fifteen years.

‘The Judge-Advocate-General reports that the proceedings are regular, the finding properly made and the sentence authorized by law, and Militia Council is of the opinion that the finding and sentence should be confirmed.

‘The Minister, therefore, recommends accordingly.

‘The committee concur in the foregoing, recommendation, subject to the reduction of the sentence to ten years and submit the same for approval.’

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »