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Posts Tagged ‘st-vincent-de-paul penitentiary’

“Paul-Emile Beaulieu fera

vingt ans de pénitencier,” Le Soleil. October 21, 1938. Page 27.

Le juge Thomas Tremblay a condamné aujourd’hui, à
20 ans, de pénitencier Paul-Emile Beaulieu, le plus
vieux des frères Beaulieu qui tentèrent un vol à main
armée à Beaupré.

POUR VOLS ET ASSAUT

Le plus vieux des frères Beaulieu
qui tentèrent un vol à main armée
à la banque de Beaupré, Paul-Emile
Beaulieu, a été condamné à 20 ans
de pénitencier par le juge Thomas
Tremblay. Cette sentence le punit
aussi d’avoir assailli sur la grande
route, à la pointe du revolver, en
août dernier, une dame Roméo Michel
afin de lui voler l’argent fait
au marché de Québec. Les deux
j frères admirent ces exploits commis en commun. Joseph Beaulieu, le plus jeune des frères, recevra sa sentence mercredi prochain si sa
santé le lui permet.

 "Vous avez fait de la prison et ou
pénitencier", dit le juge Thomas
Tremblay, “sans revenir à de meilleurs
sentiments. Vous êtes des bandits
de grande envergure, dangereux
pour la société, et je vous impose
une longue sentence afin de
vous empêcher de monter sur l’échaufaud.”
Me Ancina Tardif, avocat
du ministère public, déclara
qu’entre un voleur armé et un
meurtrier il n’y avait que la différence
de l’occasion. 

A l’adresse de la sûreté provinciale,
Me Tardif s’exprima ainsi: “Le public
ignore trop souvent les actes de courage de nos policiers. Que l’on
songe bien que dans ce cas-ci les
policiers avaient à faire face à un
des accusés qui tenait déjà en respect le gérant de la banque, à la
pointe du revolver. En telle cirI
constance, il est plausible de croire
que l’assaillant ne se laissera pas désarmer
sans résistance. Que l’on n’oublie pas qu’il a 1 an, Chateauneuf tomba foudroyé par une balle criminelle et qu’Aubin était sérieusement
blessé. Que le public n’oublie
pas ces faits et collabore davantage avec la police.“ 

On se souvient que des policiers,
dont M. Ephrem Bégin, attendaient
les deux Beauüeu à l’intérieur de’
la banque de Beaupré. Me Ancina
Tardif demanda ensuite l’imposition
de sévères sentences. Il est heureux,
ajouta-t-il. que les accusés ne
soient pas devant le tribunal sous
des accusations de meurtres; car entre
un meurtrier et un voleur armé,
il n’y a que la différence de l’occasion.” Il adressa enfin des félicitations
aux directeurs de la sûreté
provinciale.

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“Communist Jailed As Church Robber,” Montreal Gazette. October 18, 1938. Page 10. 

R. Lepage Gets Seven Years After Pleading Guilty to Over 20 Charges

Pleading guilty yesterday to more than 20 charges of theft from churches in Montreal and surrounding districts, Roland Lepage, 28, alias Fred Way, self-styled Communist, will serve the next seven years in St. Vincent de Paul penitentiary as the result of sentences imposed upon him in Police Court.

The accused objected to being charged with breaking and entering the churches, telling the court ‘that when the door is open and you walk in that is not breaking.’ The charges were amended to read plain theft and the accused pleaded guilty.

Lepage was given three five-year-terms by Judge Maurice Tetreau on three charges of theft, the three sentences to run concurrently. Brought before Judge Guerin, he was given two years on each of 21 charges of theft, the sentences to run concurrently but he will begin to serve these sentences only after he has completed the five-year term.

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“Convict Says Police Deliberately Shot His Pal; Jury Unconvinced,” The Globe and Mail. October 8, 1938. Page 04.

Admits He Escaped Jail, but Declares He Will Tell Truth; Accidental Death Is Verdict

Blind River, Oct. 7 (Special.) – An escaped convict, who admitted he had ‘lost count’ of the number of times he had been in prison, failed to convince a Coroner’s jury here today that Provincial Constable John Brown deliberately fired at and killed Harold Olsen, one of the trio that held up and robbed a Sudbury taxi driver. The jury brought in a verdict that Olsen’s death was an accident, and that the bullet fired by the officer was deflected.

The evidence of C. Fissette, who is alleged to have taken part in the holdup, along with Olsen and a third man, was the feature of the inquest. He admitted escaping from Amos when taken there from the St. Jean de Paul Penitentiary [sic], where he was serving a ten-year term for a hold-up. Subsequent to this, he said, he was arrested on a charge of breaking and entering, and of escaping from prison at Portage la Prairie.

‘Will Tell Truth’
‘I may be an escaped convict, but I will tell the truth,’ he declared, reiterating that the police officer had deliberately fired at Olsen. He admitted taking the car, but said it was not a ‘stickup.’

‘This is not the first shooting affray with the police that you have got into?’ asked J. L. O’Flynn, counsel for Constable Brown. ‘What are those marks on your body?’

‘Those are the marks of the paddles used on me in the penitentiary,’ replied Fissette.

‘But those other marks,’ persisted counsel.

‘I don’t have to tell you about that,’ retorted Fissette.

Thomas Campbell, Sudbury taxi-driver, told of having his money and his car taken from him by Fissette and his companions and of being threatened with death if he failed to do what his passengers told him.

Constable Testifies.
Provincial Constable Brown stated that with Gordon McGregor he went to arrest Fissette and his companions following the report of the holdup. He told of warning McGregor not to shoot at any one unless he was shot at first and then only to stop the car. He stated he expected the men to be armed when he started out. On seeing the men approaching, near 10 o’clock at night, he ordered them to halt. Fissette halted but the other men ran. He fired two shots into the ground from his revolver, while McGregor fired one from the rifle into the ground. Later he fired a single shot into the bush from the rifle and three shots to call other policemen to his aid. Some time later Olsen called from the darkness that he had been shot and was found shot through the right shoulder. The officer produced a section of railway tie to show that one of the bullets fired had gone through it when he shot into the ground: McGregor corroborated the officer in every detail.

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“Prisoner Said To Be Quebec Jail-Breaker,” The Globe and Mail. October 5, 1938. Page 02.

Identified by Fingerprints; Companion, Wounded by Police Bullets, Dies

Blind River, Oct. 4 – (CP) – Captured Sunday night when police bullets mortally wounded a companion after the theft of a taxi at Sudbury, eighty miles away, a prisoner in the small jail here was identified today as Morris Fiset alias Gravelle who slugged a guard and escaped from Jail at Amos, Que., July 24.

Fiset, identified by fingerprints had refused constantly since his capture to disclose his identity. He said it was up to police to find out.

Fiset was arrested after Tommy Campbell, Sudbury cab-driver, told police at Spanish, half way between Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie, three men who hired him to drive them to Whitefish stole his car.

A man who said his was name was Harold Olsen, an escaped convict from Washington D.c., died today in hospital from a bullet wound suffered in a chase after the men deserted the taxi in a ditch near Serpent River bridge. A third man escaped and police are scouring the district for him.

Object of Wide Search.
Fiset was the object of a wide police search since his escape from Amos jail, where had he had been transferred, police said, from St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, near Montreal. He had been taken to Amos to stand trial.

Police claim also he was wanted in Manitoba.

Tommy Campbell, the cab driver, told police the men hired him Sunday afternoon at Sudbury. When they reached Whitefish, he said, he felt a gun in his back and he was commanded tersely to ‘move over, we are taking your car.’ Campbell said the men warned him to be careful because ‘we are escaped convicts from the United States.’

Campbell escaped from the car at Spanish and the men continued but the car piled into a ditch a few miles away and they fled on foot. Police, however, already were on their trail and they were sighted near the Serpent River Bridge. Four shots were fired by police and one of the bullets struck Olsen.

Guard Slugged.
Amos, Que., Oct. 4 (CP). – Maurice Fisette, believed to be held by police at Blind River, Ont., after a companion had been killed by police bullets, has been a fugitive from Quebec officers since he strong-armed his way out of jail here July 24.

Serving a 10-year term in St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary for holdup, he had been brought here from the Montreal prison for trial on theft charges. Convicted, he was sentenced to three years, to run concurrently with his previous term.

While awaiting in the town jail for his return to Montreal, Fisette broke out of his cell and scaled the prison wall to freedom. On the way out, he overpowered a guard who tried to stop him.

Some weeks later, he was taken at Portage La Prairie, Man. But just as a pair of provincial detectives were setting out from here to bring him back, word came from the West that he had broken jail again.

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“Identify Prisoner As One Who Beat Way Out At Amos,” Ottawa Citizen. October 4, 1938. Page 23.

Canadian Press

BLIND RIVER, Ont.,  Oct. 4 – Captured Sunday night when police bullets mortally wounded a companion after the theft of a taxi at Sudbury, 80 miles away, a prisoner in jail here was identified today as Morris Fisette alias Gravelle who slugged a guard and escaped from Jail at Amos, Que., July 24.

Fisette, identified by fingerprints had refused constantly since his capture to disclose his identity. He said it was up to police to find out.

Fisette was arrested after Tommy Campbell, Sudbury cab driver, told police at Spanish, half way between Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie, three men who hired him to drive them to Whitefish, stole his cab.

A man who said his was name was Harold Olsen, an escaped convict from Washington D.c., died today in hospital from a bullet wound suffered in a chase after the men deserted the taxi in a ditch near Serpent River bridge. A third man escaped and police are scouring the district for him.

SLUGGED WAY OUT
AMOS, Que., Oct. 4 – Maurice Fisette, held by police at Blind River, Ont., after a companion had been killed by police bullets, has been a fugitive from Quebec officers since he strong-armed his way out of jail here July 24.

Serving a 10-year term in St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary for holdup, he had been brought here from the Montreal prison for trial on theft charges. Convicted, he was sentenced to three years, to run concurrently with his previous term.

While awaiting in the town jail for his return to Montreal, Fisette broke out of his cell and scaled the prison wall to freedom. On the way out, he overpowered a guard who tried to stop him.

Some weeks later, he was taken at Portage La Prairie, Man. But just as a pair of provincial detectives were setting out from here to bring him back, word came from the West that he had broken jail again. 

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“L’UNE DES PLUS GRAVES AU CANADA – PRISE D’OTAGES: ENQUÊTE,” La Presse

August 30, 1980. Pages 01 & 02.

PAUL ROY

Le solliciteur général du
Canada, Robert Kaplan, a
institué une enquête dans le but
de connaître tous les détails qui
ont entour é la tentativ e d’évasion de lundi, au Maximu m Laval,
et la pris e d’otages de 12
heures qui a suivi.

L’enquête, qui devrait être
complétée d’ici à une semaine, a
été confiée à l’inspecteur général
des Services correctionnels
canadiens, Al Wrenshall, qui
tentera notamment de découvrir
comment 10 détenus de ce pénitencier
à sécurité maximale ont
pu se procurer des armes et se
retrouver tous ensemble après le
déjeuner, lundi matin. L’ex-policier
de la GRC devra également
formuler des recommandations
dans le but d’empêche r que des
événements semblable s se reproduisent.

Le Solliciteur général a déclaré
que Laval a vécu l’une des
«plus graves prises d’otages de
l’histoire du Canada».
De passage à St-Vincent-de-Paul hier après-midi, M. Kaplan
a loué la fermeté des autorités
pénitentiaires qui, en aucun
temps, n’ont accepté de négocier
avec les mutins, dont un a été
tué par un garde dès le début de
l’évasion ratée . «Ce ser a une
leçon pour tous les détenus à
travers le pays», a déclaré le solliciteur
général, de retour d’un
congrès sur la question des pénitenciers,
à Caracas, au Venezuela.

Selon lui, les pénitenciers canadiens sont plus sécuritaires
que jamais et aucun ne l’est plus
que le Maximum Laval. Pourquoi
toutes ces prises d’otages,
donc? Parce qu’ils représenteraient
également un danger plus
grand qui jamais.

M. Kaplan explique cette apparente contradiction de la façon
suivante: d’un côté, les
mesures sécuritaires sont de
plus en plus raffinées et le personnel
est de mieux en mieux
entraîné; de l’autre, la «qualité»
des détenus se détériore depuis
que l’on a commencé à infliger
des peines dites communautaires aux criminels ne représen tant pas un danger pour la société.

De plus, souligne M. Kaplan,
les détenus ne sont plus confinés
à leurs cellules 23 heures sur 24,
ils ont beaucoup plus de possibilités
d’en sortir pour travailler,
étudier, etc., ce qui augmente

d’autant les possibilités de faire
entrer des armes de l’extérieur
et de prépar r des évasions.

Le ministre affirme néanmoins que cette libéralisation est
justifiée sur le plan de la réhabilitation
et qu’elle ne sera pas
remise en cause. A l’inévitable
question sur la peine de mort, il
a répondu que rien ne prouvait
jusqu’ici que le châtiment capital
permettrai t de réduir e le
nombre de meurtres. «Si c’était
le cas, je voterais en faveur»,
d’ajouter le ministre.

En attendant, les neuf mutins
qui ont survécu aux événements
de cette semaine ont été transférés
au Centre de développement
correctionnel, le «super maximum»
d’à côté , et les 12 otages
ont pu retrouver leurs familles.

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“Hostage-taking inquiry is likely to remain secret,” Montreal Gazette. August 30, 1980. Page 03.

By ELLEN McKeough
of The Gazette

An inquiry into one of ‘the most serious hostage takings in the history of Canada’ should be ready in a week – but it will probably never be made public, the solicitor-general of Canada said yesterday.

Robert Kaplan was touring the maximum security Laval Institute where a three-day hostage-taking ended Thursday.

He said yesterday the results of the investigation will not be made public because he refused to ‘publish blueprints of our prisons and our contingency plans.’

He does not expect that any one person will be held responsible for the 74-hour drama in which nien convicts held 12 people hostage in a desperate bid for freedom.

Kaplan has appointed Al Wrenshall, inspector-general of prisons and former RCMP chief superintendent, to find out how 10 convicts got outside the prison’s west gate.

While of the convicts was shot to death, the rest – including five convicted killers – were trapped against an outside wall and used 12 hostages for cover.

Kaplan, 43, called the incident the ‘most serious hostage-taking in the history of Canada.’

‘I am determined we are going to learned from this incident,’ the solicitor-general said.

The inquiry will also look into two recent escapes from the maximum-security jail at Dorchester, N. B.

Kaplan said longer sentences are a factor in the increased number of hostage takings incidents in prison becaue ‘they contribute to the desperation of the inmates.’

He said the peaceful ending of the latest incident swhows the ‘value of our hard-line policy’ of not negotiating with offenders.

The convicts surrendered Thursday morning after one of the convicts almost cracked under the strain and threatened to kill himself or someone else.

They laid down their revolvers and gave up their hostages at 10:30 a.m.

Freed hostages contacted yesterday by The Gazette refused to comment on their ordeal.

The hostage-takers will spend the next six months in solitary confinement at the nearby Correctional Development Centre.

Kaplan dismissed complaints from Edgard Roussel, one of the Laval convicts, that the ‘super-maximum’ security centre near Laval is ‘designed only to turn us into beasts, to develop killer instincts.’

The solicitor-general answered that the ‘prison officials can help…but the prisoner has to want to go straight…’

Roussel made the complaints in an open letter he sent to a member of Parliament in April.

The government plans to close the 107-year-old Laval Institute by 1986.

The prison has been condemned by at least three royal commissions of inquiry and one government subcommittee.

In the four years preceeding this latest incident, there have been four hostage-taking incidents at Laval. In one incident two years ago, a guard was killed as five inmates made an unsuccessful escape bid.

The prisoner’s plea that preceded incident
Edgar Roussel, one of our nine prisoners involved in a 74-hour hostage-taking at the maximum security Laval Institute this week, warned an MP four months ago that unless his prison conditions improved he would probably commit ‘a desperate act.’

‘I sense that something has broken down in the system and if no one intervenes on my behalf the worst can be expected,’ the 34-year-old convicted murderer wrote Mark MacGuigan from his cell.

‘The saturation point has been reached, the slightest incident could be the (spark), could lead to a desperate act.’

Roussel, serving two life terms for the killing of two men in a Montreal bar in 1974, wrote the appeal to MacGuigan – now the external affairs minister but formerly the head of a Parliamentary inquiry into prison conditions – last April while serving time in the ‘super-maximum’ security Correctional Develppment Centre, a separate facility not far from Laval Institute.

Roussel was sent there in March, 1978, after taking part in the longest hostage-taking incident in history of Canadian prisons at a provincial jail near St. Jerome.

‘For two long and interminable years I have not hugged my wife, my mother, or my daughter,’ Roussell wrote in the 2,500-word letter to MacGuigan, published in its entirety yesterday in Le Devoir.

‘And for two long years as well I have gone without seeing the light of the moon, the stars. To the most vile of animals this right is not denied.

‘In summer, it (the cell) is a cremation oven whcih is made intolerable by total inactivity. In the morning, a symphony of clearing of throats, of blowing of noses, of horase coughs to clear the respiratory system.

‘For nearly two years I have slept on the floor of my cell, my head resting at the bottom of the door to benefit from the small breeze, incomparable luxury.’

Roussel claimed that due to ‘a thirst for vengeance’ on the part of penitentiayr officials, he had been held in isolation longer than the two other convicts involved in the St. Jerome hostage-taking.

Roussel and the eight prisoners have been transferred back to the Correctional Development Centre for a period of at least six months as punishment for their role in the hostage taking.

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