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“Is Sentenced For Stabbing,“ The Globe and Mail. October 25, 1938. Page 03.

Sudbury, Oct. 24 (Special). – The sequel to a stabbing affray at Capreol last June, in which William Burman, 46, met his death at the hands of Steve Masluk, Ukrainian lumberjack, was written in supreme court here today when Mr. Justice J. McTague sentenced the accused to two years and six months in Portsmouth penitentiary.

A murder charge against Masluk was reduced to manslaughter after the evidence was heard last week.

Mr. Justice McTague pointed out that although manslaughter carried a term of life imprisonment, he was inclined to be lenient as Burman was the aggressor in all fights of which evidence had been given.

‘I think you might have been provoked to the point of drawing a knife, but that is one thing you must learned, the use of knives cannot be tolerated in this country.’

The supreme court justice dated the sentence from the time of Masluk’s arrest on June 7, the day the stabbing took place.

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“Gets 2 Years For Holdup Of Taximan,” The Globe and Mail. October 25, 1938. Page 03.

Sentence for Robbery With Violence Runs Concurrently With 10-Year Term Already Imposed

One Man Still Sought

Sudbury, Oct. 24 (Special). – With five police officers present in the courtroom, Maurice Fisette, 27, one of the trio who on Oct. 2, held up and robbed Tom Campbell, Sudbury taxi driver, pleaded guilty to the theft of a car and robbery with violence. He was sentenced to two years in Portsmouth penitentiary on each charge, the sentences to run concurrently.

Fisette accepted his sentence, without giving any clue as the identity of the third man who is still at liberty. Harold Olsen, a member of the trio, was struck by a police bullet which glanced off a rock, as police attempted to apprehend the men about 100 miles west of Sudbury. Olsen died in the Red Cross Hospital at Blind River the following day. At the inquest which followed Constable J. Brown, who fired the fatal bullet, was absol;ved of all blame in connection with the bandit’s death.

Before sentence was pased FIsette asked ‘for a chance to go straight.’ He told Magistrate J. S. McKessock he already had a ten-year sentence to serve and pleaded for leniency ‘to give me time to get out and go straight.’ Magistrate McKessock expressed the opinion in passing sentence Fisette had ‘already wasted your opportunities.’

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“Escaped from Burwash; Sent To Kingston,” Ottawa Standard. October 8, 1918.

Two Young Men Start Early on Downward Career.

Sentences of two years in Kingston penitentiary were meted out to two young men, Joseph Claro and Norman G. Williams, who pleaded guilty in Tuesday’s police court to escaping from Burwash Industrial Farm. The two seemed thoroughly repentant for their action, but the court thought that their chances for parole would be better at Kingston than at the institution they had just left.

Young in Crime
Norman Williams is but 20 years of age. He was sentenced at Toronto to serve a term for the theft of an automobile. On the 24th of September he escaped from custody and when caught was taken back with just a warning. On October 4th, he escaped again in company of Joseph Claro, alias Joseph Cleroux. This man has a bad record, with a previous term at the penitentiary, time in local jails and a reform school, and a lengthy sentence at Burwash ahead before his elopment. He and Williams escaped from the Industrial Farm, made their way along the rail line, evading the guards searching for them, and absconding with a motor car in Copper Cliff….
[damage in original]
….consecutively with the sentences they were serving.

‘Notwithstanding your youthfulness you are dangerous characters to be at large, and if I send you to Kingston Penitentiary I think they will be able to help you there,’ Magistrate Askwith declared.

Their recapture Tuesday afternoon was effected by Inspector Joliet and his squad after an exciting chase through New Edinburgh. Shots were fired by the detectives.

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“Prisoner Said To Be Quebec Jail-Breaker,” The Globe and Mail. October 5, 1938. Page 02.

Identified by Fingerprints; Companion, Wounded by Police Bullets, Dies

Blind River, Oct. 4 – (CP) – Captured Sunday night when police bullets mortally wounded a companion after the theft of a taxi at Sudbury, eighty miles away, a prisoner in the small jail here was identified today as Morris Fiset alias Gravelle who slugged a guard and escaped from Jail at Amos, Que., July 24.

Fiset, identified by fingerprints had refused constantly since his capture to disclose his identity. He said it was up to police to find out.

Fiset was arrested after Tommy Campbell, Sudbury cab-driver, told police at Spanish, half way between Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie, three men who hired him to drive them to Whitefish stole his car.

A man who said his was name was Harold Olsen, an escaped convict from Washington D.c., died today in hospital from a bullet wound suffered in a chase after the men deserted the taxi in a ditch near Serpent River bridge. A third man escaped and police are scouring the district for him.

Object of Wide Search.
Fiset was the object of a wide police search since his escape from Amos jail, where had he had been transferred, police said, from St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, near Montreal. He had been taken to Amos to stand trial.

Police claim also he was wanted in Manitoba.

Tommy Campbell, the cab driver, told police the men hired him Sunday afternoon at Sudbury. When they reached Whitefish, he said, he felt a gun in his back and he was commanded tersely to ‘move over, we are taking your car.’ Campbell said the men warned him to be careful because ‘we are escaped convicts from the United States.’

Campbell escaped from the car at Spanish and the men continued but the car piled into a ditch a few miles away and they fled on foot. Police, however, already were on their trail and they were sighted near the Serpent River Bridge. Four shots were fired by police and one of the bullets struck Olsen.

Guard Slugged.
Amos, Que., Oct. 4 (CP). – Maurice Fisette, believed to be held by police at Blind River, Ont., after a companion had been killed by police bullets, has been a fugitive from Quebec officers since he strong-armed his way out of jail here July 24.

Serving a 10-year term in St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary for holdup, he had been brought here from the Montreal prison for trial on theft charges. Convicted, he was sentenced to three years, to run concurrently with his previous term.

While awaiting in the town jail for his return to Montreal, Fisette broke out of his cell and scaled the prison wall to freedom. On the way out, he overpowered a guard who tried to stop him.

Some weeks later, he was taken at Portage La Prairie, Man. But just as a pair of provincial detectives were setting out from here to bring him back, word came from the West that he had broken jail again.

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“Identify Prisoner As One Who Beat Way Out At Amos,” Ottawa Citizen. October 4, 1938. Page 23.

Canadian Press

BLIND RIVER, Ont.,  Oct. 4 – Captured Sunday night when police bullets mortally wounded a companion after the theft of a taxi at Sudbury, 80 miles away, a prisoner in jail here was identified today as Morris Fisette alias Gravelle who slugged a guard and escaped from Jail at Amos, Que., July 24.

Fisette, identified by fingerprints had refused constantly since his capture to disclose his identity. He said it was up to police to find out.

Fisette was arrested after Tommy Campbell, Sudbury cab driver, told police at Spanish, half way between Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie, three men who hired him to drive them to Whitefish, stole his cab.

A man who said his was name was Harold Olsen, an escaped convict from Washington D.c., died today in hospital from a bullet wound suffered in a chase after the men deserted the taxi in a ditch near Serpent River bridge. A third man escaped and police are scouring the district for him.

SLUGGED WAY OUT
AMOS, Que., Oct. 4 – Maurice Fisette, held by police at Blind River, Ont., after a companion had been killed by police bullets, has been a fugitive from Quebec officers since he strong-armed his way out of jail here July 24.

Serving a 10-year term in St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary for holdup, he had been brought here from the Montreal prison for trial on theft charges. Convicted, he was sentenced to three years, to run concurrently with his previous term.

While awaiting in the town jail for his return to Montreal, Fisette broke out of his cell and scaled the prison wall to freedom. On the way out, he overpowered a guard who tried to stop him.

Some weeks later, he was taken at Portage La Prairie, Man. But just as a pair of provincial detectives were setting out from here to bring him back, word came from the West that he had broken jail again. 

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“‘Bling Pig’ Raid,” Kingston Daily Standard. September 4, 1912. Page 01.

Heavy Sentences Were Imposed On Ten Offenders at Cobalt.

Cobalt, Sept. 4. – The biggest ‘blind pig’ raid in months occurred when the Provincial police rounded up thirteen alleged illegal sellers of liquor here and in South Lorraine. Yesterday ten convictions were registered with Inspector George Morrison, prosecuting. Three cases were adjourned till to-day.

The following are the sentences imposed yesterday: Patrick Redmond, $200 or six months in jail; Alphonse Beland, four months in jail; Spiers Romanus, $100; George Peterson, four months: Luke Farrell, four months; John Major, $300 or nine months; Peter Peterson, $100; Joseph Perreault, ten months; Fred Paquette, $300; Bert Deschenes, twelve months.

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“No Jury For The Inquest Being Held Today,” Sudbury Star. August 21, 1918. Page 03.

Witnessses to Tell Story of the Shooting of Defaulter.

The inquest into the death of Cyprien Gareau, the Blezard Valley defaulter shot by Dominion Officer Tougher at a farm house last Saturday morning, is taking place this afternoon before Coroner Dr. W. R. Patterson, without a jury. The body has been at Henry’s morgue since last Saturday.

SHOT AT UNDERTAKERS.
Undertakers who went to the farm house at Blezard last Saturday afternoon report having been shot at from the bush, near the house, several times, while several automobiles have also reported that they have heard bullets whiz by in the same locality. While the police do not place much credence on the reports of shooting, which they attribute more or less to imagination, the undertakers are emphatic they heard the reports of the rifles and the whiz of the bullets close to their rig. It was while returning with the body that the shooting incident occurred.

OFFICERS GIVEN SAFE CONDUCT
In direct contrast to the visit of the undertakers is that on Monday afternoon o provincial officers headed by Inspector Storie. The inspector reports he drove purposely past the spot from which the shots were supposed to come, and all was peace and quiet. This may be accounted for, however, by the fact that a brother of one of the defaulters who is at large was in the vehicle with the officer.

There seems to be no doubt but what there was shooting. The undertakers say they met several soldiers, belonging to the district and home on harvest leave. The soldiers took to the bush as soon as the firing started. They later emerged with their tunics under their arms.

STORIES VARY SOMEWHAT
Visits to the scene of the shooting were paid by Inspector Storie on Monday and again on Tuesday. An investigation was conducted and witnesses subpoenaed for the inquest. The Inspector found that the stories of the Dominion Police and that of the relatives of the deceased man tally up fairly well, except that there is a difference of opinion as to who fired the first shot. Those at the farm house say the officers fired first, but this is not borne out by the investigation. 

FOUR BULLET MARKS
There are four bullet marks inside the house. These bear out the story of the Dominion officers that the first shot, from which Officer Tougher bears powder marks on his face, passed through the roof of the lean-to of the house, where the deceased man was located when Tougher pulled back the curtain. The bullet mark is in the roof. There is also a bullet hole in the front door, which tallies up with the police story that a shot was fired through the closed door at the officers as they were retiring from the house. The next shot was apparently fired by Tougher after the door had been re-opened. This shot passed through the body of the dead man, who was apparently standing in the door of the bedroom, hit a knob on the bedpost and careened off into the wall. There is also a shot in the window sill, also fired from the inside, which so far has not been connected up with the story, unless it was fired to scare the officers away.

MAY GIVE HIMSELF UP
Hopes are held out that a younger Gareau, brother of deceased, also a defaulter, will give himself up before the inquest. Relatives have given the police assurance that they will advise the young man to take this course, and it was hoped that he would surrender on Monday, but the plan did not materialize. The authorities were given assurance that he would be produced before August 24th, the last day of pardon extended by the Minister of Justice.

Crown Attorney Miller is acting for the Crown at the inquest and Mr. B. Boutet for the family of the deceased. Mr. Boutet has also paid a visit to the scene of the shooting.

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“Six Months For Guy,” Sudbury Star. August 21, 1918. Page 08.

After several remands William Guy, 18 years, was sentenced to six months at Burwash for shop-breaking at Blezard Valley. In Monday morning’s court, up to which time sentence had been deferred to endeavor to have the boy’s father attend court, Mr. J. A. Lemieux, of Blezard Valley, stated that the father’s attitude was that of ‘let the boy take his medicine.’ Another attempt to have the father, a blacksmith in Sudbury, attend court, was successful. Sentence was passed Tuesday morning.

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“Immoral Women Are In The Toils,” Sudbury Star. August 21, 1918. Page 08.

From recent arrests made by Provincial Constable George Grassick there has apparently been an influx of immoral women from Montreal into this district of late. They have been given short shrift by the provincial policeman, however, as two of the number already taken into custody say they have been in the district but two weeks. They have been making their headquarters at Stobie Mine. On the occasion of the police visit to the place, however, only one girl, Cecile Gauthier, was found at home. Ellen Sunden has since been arrested, while a girl named Hilda is still at large.

CLEAN UP THE NEST
The two girls so far arrested have pleaded guilty, but have been remanded for sentence for a week.

‘Clean up the nest,’ Magistrate Brodie told the police when he deferred sentence Tuesday morning.

WANTS TO MARRY GIRL
A young well-dressed Italian, with a brush cut and of a smart appearance, came forward to the dock in Tuesday’s court and offered to marry the Gauthier girl if the Magistrate would release her. The girl is but eighteen years old, well dressed and good looking. After a few questions the magistrate decided against the union, for a time at least.

GAUTHIER GIRL’S STORY
Cecile Gauthier told the court that she came of good people in Montreal and that her step-brother was a Jesuit Father in that city. Addresses were given the court. The girl continued that she had left Montreal in company with two other girls and had told her parents that she had secured a position with a Montreal family as nurse girl and companion. From Toronto they came to Sudbury, which proved to be the end of their journey, the trio running foul of the provincial police.

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“Garson Farmer Faces Charge Of Harboring,” Sudbury Star. August 21, 1918. Page 03.

Dominion Police State Edward Martell Is Hiding Cousin.

The first charge of harboring a deserter to be laid by the Dominion Police at Sudbury was read in Monday morning’s police court, against Edward Martell, Garson township. He is charged with harboring John Martell, his cousin, a deserter from the C.E.F. The case was adjourned until Saturday morning next. It is understood that the court is prepared to take a lenient view of the case providing that in the meantime Pte. Martell, the deserter, is delivered to the military. B. Boutet appeared for accused Monday morning and entered a plea of not guilty.

While this is the first charge of harboring to be instituted by the Dominion Police, there have been many instances where prosecution could have been started for harboring, aiding and abetting. Flagrant cases have been known to the police, in which the mothers of the offenders have played important parts and it was mainly for this reason that no action was taken.

MORE SHOOTING
More shooting is reported from Garson township in addition to that which took place and is daily taking place in Blezard township. The Dominion police last Thursday went out to the Edward Martell farm in Garson township and while making enquiries at the farm house were shot at by some one, presumably John Martell, the deserter, who was concealed in the barn. He later made good his escape to the bush and is still at large.

BOOZE BURIED IN GROUND
The Ontario Temperance Act is no respecter of persons. It may happen that Luigi Augustini, hard working man and the father of five young children, one of whom is very sick, may have to go to jail for three months. There is, however, another side to the story, that of Chief Brown, of the municipal police.

The hardship plea failed to move the court Monday morning when Augustini was fined $300 and costs. A few days ago one Koski, up on a drunk charge, disclosed the source of his supply, a case being later found buried beside the Augustini residence. The plea that some one else had buried the case beside the house was also put forth, the possibilities of which were dwelt upon eloquently and at some length by Mr. J. A. Mulligan, counsel for accused. Magistrate Brodie also turned a deaf ear to this plea.

But all’s well that ends well, and there is a chance now that kind friends will come to the rescue of the poor, hard-working Augustini and pay his fine, the authorities having agreed to a recess until Saturday next.

THREE MEN AND A GIRL
A pretty, young French-Canadian girl of eighteen summers, Cecile Gatien, who originally hails from Montreal and has been in these parts but two weeks, was found in a house Saturday night with three Austrians. Provincial Constable Grassick was out that way on another mission Saturday night last when three autos in front of the house attracted his attention. All lights had been darkened on the autos and he was unable to secure numbers as they scurried away. There is a suspicion that they were licensed jitneys. Several complaints about the house have been made to the police.

Two of the men came from Murray Mine and for that reason the charge of leaving their place of residence without the permission of the police failed. The magistrate held that as there was no registrar at Murray Mine, and as Stobie and Murray are in the same municipality, this charge could not succeed. The third young foreigner, however, come from Garson, which made $10 and costs difference.

On a charge of being frequenters of a house of ill fame and three men pleaded guilty and paid $10 and costs.

The young girl pleaded guilty to being a keeper, her counsel asking a week’s remand, which was granted. She has a lover, a young Italian, it is understood, who is willing to go to the altar with the erring girl, and in case the marriage materializes the leniency of the court for a chance to make good will be asked.

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“Changed His Mind,” Sudbury Star. August 21, 1918. Page 08.

Roy Dalton, one of the gang of jail breakers awaiting transfer to Kingston to serve a three-year term, wants to join the army, but the authorities hung up the ‘nothing doing’ sign. Dalton was the fellow who passed the remark at the time of his sentence that he would come out of Kingston with a whole skin, and that was more than a lot of the soldiers would do. He has evidently changed his mind, for on Tuesday he sent for Inspector Storie to tell him he was a deserter and should be in the army. Dalton, however, will go to Kingston very shortly, and under very close guard, in view of his successful attempt at jail breaking at Parry Sound and two unsuccessful attempts at Sudbury jail.

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“Penitentiary for Quintette of Burglars,” Sudbury Star. August 17, 1918. Page 05.

Whole Gang Sentenced in Yesterday’s Court.

Jos. Dalton, 5 years.
Roy Dalton, 3 years.
Jos. Trahan, 2 years.
Ovila Martin, 2 years.
Arthur Boucher, 2 years.

With these sentences to Kingston penitentiary meted out by Police Magistrate Brodie in Friday’s Court, the gang which broke jail at Parry Sound during the past month and coming North committed a series of burglaries at Coniston, Warren and St. Charles, is completely cleaned up. Excellent work by Inspector Storie and Officer Fred Lefebvre, of the Provincial police, gathered in the men within ten days of their appearance in this section.

All the accused pleaded guilty to jail breaking at Parry Sound and to burglary with the exception of Jos. Dalton, whom Magistrate Brodie characterized as the ‘modern Jesse james.’ He was undoubtedbly the master mind of the gang, and although a cripple piloted their operations. He was convicted on the evidence of Boucher who gave the court a clear review of the operations of the gang.

Both the Daltons were recalcitrant and took both their arrest and sentence with bad grace and contempt for the law. Roy Dalton, who is liable under the Military Service Act, passed the callous remark to the constables removing him to the jail after sentence that he would come out of Kingston with a whole skin ‘and that was more than many of the….fighting over in France would do.’

GOOD POLICE WORK.
The round-up of the gang is much to the credit of the Provincial police organization in the North. The manner in which Joe Dalton, Trahan and Martin were gathered in a week ago by officer Fred Lefebvre has been previously reported. At that time Roy Dalton and Boucher decamped and on Wednesday Inspector Storie and Officer Lefebvre went into the district again after them. They located them on Thursday on farms in the Markstay section. Inspector Storie went after Roy Dalton and got his man at the point of the rifle, before he had a chance to move. Dalton’s only comment was ‘you don’t take any chances.’ When searched he had a six-chamber automatic revolver in his hip pocket, fully loaded. Officer Fred Lefebvre came in with Boucher who was working on another farm seven miles away. The valuable assistance given by practically every resident of the district where the gang was, in helping round them up, helped the officers in their expeditious arrests. The quintette will be removed to Kingston penitentiary Sunday night.

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“Defaulter Dead In Clash With Military Police,” Sudbury Star. August 17, 1918. Page 01.

Officers Were Targets of Fusilade of Rifle Firing.

Cyprien Gareau, aged 28, Blezard township, a defaulter under the Military Service Act, is dead from gun shot wounds received in a Dominion police search for defaulters last night. The shooting occurred at the hom of the deceased, a mile and a half from Blezard postoffice, about 3.30 this (Saturday) morning. Coroner Dr. W. R. Patterson was called by the Dominion police to attend the wounded man and found him dead. An inquest with a jury will be held Monday. Officer Tougher, who shot Gareau, surrendered himself this morning before Magistrate Brodie and has been released on $2,000 bail bonds.

With five Dominion police officers Inspector Tolmie left Sudbury last night, acting on information as to the whereabouts of a number of defaulters in Blezard township. The Gareau home was the third farmhouse the police had visited, the search of the other two having been fruitless. It was about 3.30 this morning when the Gareau home was reached. Inspector Tolmie, with two officers, was in the house examining the papers of two men, when one of the officers stepped over to a curtain which partitioned the room, in search of any other male residents of the household. As the officer threw back the curtain he was fired at point blank by a man sitting on a bed behind the curtain, only a few feet away, holding a rifle. The officers backed away and emerged from the house amid more rifle firing from inside the house. Officer Tougher responded with one shot from outside the house through the door, with the fatal effect. There are two Gareau boys defaulters under the M.S.A.  The other brother was in the house at the time, but escaped.

The Dominion police squad were not all armed, not anticipating trouble. After the affray Inspector Tolmie left three of his men on the Gareay farm as guard and came to Sudbury for rifles and ammunition, returning about 6 a.m. Throughout the night there was some firing from the bush and when the squad left the scene at about six o’clock this morning their departing automobile was subjected to a fusilade of rifle shots from the woods.

It was not until seven o’clock this morning, when a truce was declared and the officers re-entered the house, that they knew the tragedy has occurred. No outcry was made and as soon as young Gareau’s condition was learned the officers immediately summoned medical attention.

The most positive definance of the Military Service Act is evident throughout the Blezard Valley section, Inspector Tolmie informed The Star today. There are over forty defaulters and deserters listed in the district and there is not a day that some incident is not reported of lawlessness that is credited to the defaulters, including the theft of calves, sheep and fowl, and store burglarlies alleged to be committed by them in search of food for the several hiding places. The defaulters have shown nothing but contempt for the recent amnesty extended by the Minister of Justice. Word has been sent by friends to every one of the forty names posted, and there has been only one response to the offer of pardon.

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“Escapes From Jail Narrowly Averted,” Sudbury Star. August 14, 1918. Page 08.

An attempted escape by at least three prisoners from Sudbury jail was narrowly averted Sunday, when gaoler O’Neill, suspecting that something was wrong, shifted the inmates around and conducted an investigation. It was found taht three inmates had succeeded in sawing the bars of their cells, which had been carefully set back in position ready to lift out as soon as the opportune moment present itself for a get-away. The three prisoners implicated are Fred Whissel being held for the murder of Dominion Constable McLeod at Espanola, while resisting arrest under the Military Service Act, Lorne Beck, awaiting removal to Kingston Penitentiary as an incorrigble, having escaped twice from Burwash Industrial Farm, and Jos. Dalton, admitted only last Thursday afternoon, one of the trio rounded up by the Provincial Police near St. Charles and one of the five who escaped during the past month from Parry Sound gaol.

It was the feigned coughing of Dalton at every appearance of gaoler O’Neill during Sunday afternoon that aroused the official’s suspicions. This was afterwards learned to be the signal to the other prisoners to cease sawing the bars of their cells. Sunday evening the inmates in the north corridor were transferred to the south corridor and vice versa, and an inspection of the south side corridor located a small hack saw blade hidden in the door jam of one of the cells. The saw blade was brought into the jail by Whissel it is said at the time was committed, having been concealed in the lapel of his mackinaw coat.

That all three men are of the desperate type may be assumed from their admissions on Monday morning that even after they had been foiled in their attempted ecape by being transferred to new cells Sunday evening, the three had conspired to make a break for liberty by a concentrated attack on the turnkey when they were admitted to the corridor Monday morning, and were to use the loose bars from their previous cells as their weapons, secure the keys, and clear out.

The keys of the Parry Sound gaol were found on young Dalton on his arrest last Thursday, he with four others having made a clean get-away from the district jail to the south in a similar manner to that attempted here Sunday.                                 

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Remembering #KimberlyRogers, found dead Aug. 11th, 2001, in her 3rd-floor-attic apartment in Sudbury, Ontario, during a heat wave, 8 months pregnant, and under house arrest.

This is part of her story:

► In April 2001 Kimberly Rogers was convicted of welfare fraud for receiving $13,648.31 in student loans while collecting social assistance.

► The money helped pay for 4 years of community college. (She earned her diploma in social services in April 2000.)

► After her conviction, she was automatically suspended from receiving Ontario Works benefits for 3 months.

The #Penalty was harsh:
→ 6 months under house arrest
→ allowed out of her hot 3rd floor apartment only 3 hours a week
→ expected to repay $13,648.31
→ 18 months probation
→ loss of the right to have part of her student loan forgiven
→ no income at all for 3 months.

On May 14, 2001 Kimberly Rogers launched an important case under the Charter of Rights that challenged the constitutional validity of Ontario Works regulations that suspended benefits after a conviction of welfare fraud.

The grounds for the #CharterChallenge were:
→ Cruel and unusual punishment
→ Charter infractions
→ Violation of Canada’s international covenants

• On May 31st Justice Epstein granted a temporary injunction reinstating her benefits (pending the appeal).

• Even after her benefits were reinstated Kimberly Rogers did not have enough money to support herself and her unborn child.

• Her Ontario Works Benefits were $468.00 / mo. (after the deduction to repay the overpayment was deducted from her $520 monthly benefits – the maximum benefit for a single OW recipient.)

• $18.00 a month left to purchase food, pay utilities, transportation, telephone, and everything else, after $450.00 Rent

• Alone, pregnant with no money. Is starvation a suitable penalty for any crime?

This #Tragedy didn’t have to happen. We need to ask:

• Why are social assistance rates so low that people cannot feed, clothe and otherwise support themselves and their children?

• Why is it so difficult for poor people to attend post-secondary education?

• Why has the number of homeless people increased so dramatically?

• Why do so many people – including students – need to use food banks?

• Why are we making criminals out of people who are desperately trying to get by on inadequate benefits? #CriminalizationOfPoverty

The #InquestJury made 21 recommendations, including:

1. end to both the temporary and lifetime welfare bans

2. amend the Act to allow Local Ontario Works Administrator to exercise discretion

3. ensure that adequate housing, food and/or medications is provided to the person serving a sentence under house arrest

4. assessment of the adequacy of all social assistance rates – allowances for housing and basic needs should be based on actual costs within a particular community or region

The City of North Bay was the first municipality in Ontario to pass a resolution on January 2000 to petition the Ontario Government to withdraw the Welfare Ban policy as “harsh and unfair treatment of citizens of this province”.

– shared from Facebook post by

Barbara Anello, August 10, 2018 

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