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“Is Sentenced For Stabbing,“ The Globe and Mail. October 25, 1938. Page 03.

Sudbury, Oct. 24 (Special). – The sequel to a stabbing affray at Capreol last June, in which William Burman, 46, met his death at the hands of Steve Masluk, Ukrainian lumberjack, was written in supreme court here today when Mr. Justice J. McTague sentenced the accused to two years and six months in Portsmouth penitentiary.

A murder charge against Masluk was reduced to manslaughter after the evidence was heard last week.

Mr. Justice McTague pointed out that although manslaughter carried a term of life imprisonment, he was inclined to be lenient as Burman was the aggressor in all fights of which evidence had been given.

‘I think you might have been provoked to the point of drawing a knife, but that is one thing you must learned, the use of knives cannot be tolerated in this country.’

The supreme court justice dated the sentence from the time of Masluk’s arrest on June 7, the day the stabbing took place.

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“Gets 2 Years For Holdup Of Taximan,” The Globe and Mail. October 25, 1938. Page 03.

Sentence for Robbery With Violence Runs Concurrently With 10-Year Term Already Imposed

One Man Still Sought

Sudbury, Oct. 24 (Special). – With five police officers present in the courtroom, Maurice Fisette, 27, one of the trio who on Oct. 2, held up and robbed Tom Campbell, Sudbury taxi driver, pleaded guilty to the theft of a car and robbery with violence. He was sentenced to two years in Portsmouth penitentiary on each charge, the sentences to run concurrently.

Fisette accepted his sentence, without giving any clue as the identity of the third man who is still at liberty. Harold Olsen, a member of the trio, was struck by a police bullet which glanced off a rock, as police attempted to apprehend the men about 100 miles west of Sudbury. Olsen died in the Red Cross Hospital at Blind River the following day. At the inquest which followed Constable J. Brown, who fired the fatal bullet, was absol;ved of all blame in connection with the bandit’s death.

Before sentence was pased FIsette asked ‘for a chance to go straight.’ He told Magistrate J. S. McKessock he already had a ten-year sentence to serve and pleaded for leniency ‘to give me time to get out and go straight.’ Magistrate McKessock expressed the opinion in passing sentence Fisette had ‘already wasted your opportunities.’

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“Escaped from Burwash; Sent To Kingston,” Ottawa Standard. October 8, 1918.

Two Young Men Start Early on Downward Career.

Sentences of two years in Kingston penitentiary were meted out to two young men, Joseph Claro and Norman G. Williams, who pleaded guilty in Tuesday’s police court to escaping from Burwash Industrial Farm. The two seemed thoroughly repentant for their action, but the court thought that their chances for parole would be better at Kingston than at the institution they had just left.

Young in Crime
Norman Williams is but 20 years of age. He was sentenced at Toronto to serve a term for the theft of an automobile. On the 24th of September he escaped from custody and when caught was taken back with just a warning. On October 4th, he escaped again in company of Joseph Claro, alias Joseph Cleroux. This man has a bad record, with a previous term at the penitentiary, time in local jails and a reform school, and a lengthy sentence at Burwash ahead before his elopment. He and Williams escaped from the Industrial Farm, made their way along the rail line, evading the guards searching for them, and absconding with a motor car in Copper Cliff….
[damage in original]
….consecutively with the sentences they were serving.

‘Notwithstanding your youthfulness you are dangerous characters to be at large, and if I send you to Kingston Penitentiary I think they will be able to help you there,’ Magistrate Askwith declared.

Their recapture Tuesday afternoon was effected by Inspector Joliet and his squad after an exciting chase through New Edinburgh. Shots were fired by the detectives.

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“Prisoner Said To Be Quebec Jail-Breaker,” The Globe and Mail. October 5, 1938. Page 02.

Identified by Fingerprints; Companion, Wounded by Police Bullets, Dies

Blind River, Oct. 4 – (CP) – Captured Sunday night when police bullets mortally wounded a companion after the theft of a taxi at Sudbury, eighty miles away, a prisoner in the small jail here was identified today as Morris Fiset alias Gravelle who slugged a guard and escaped from Jail at Amos, Que., July 24.

Fiset, identified by fingerprints had refused constantly since his capture to disclose his identity. He said it was up to police to find out.

Fiset was arrested after Tommy Campbell, Sudbury cab-driver, told police at Spanish, half way between Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie, three men who hired him to drive them to Whitefish stole his car.

A man who said his was name was Harold Olsen, an escaped convict from Washington D.c., died today in hospital from a bullet wound suffered in a chase after the men deserted the taxi in a ditch near Serpent River bridge. A third man escaped and police are scouring the district for him.

Object of Wide Search.
Fiset was the object of a wide police search since his escape from Amos jail, where had he had been transferred, police said, from St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary, near Montreal. He had been taken to Amos to stand trial.

Police claim also he was wanted in Manitoba.

Tommy Campbell, the cab driver, told police the men hired him Sunday afternoon at Sudbury. When they reached Whitefish, he said, he felt a gun in his back and he was commanded tersely to ‘move over, we are taking your car.’ Campbell said the men warned him to be careful because ‘we are escaped convicts from the United States.’

Campbell escaped from the car at Spanish and the men continued but the car piled into a ditch a few miles away and they fled on foot. Police, however, already were on their trail and they were sighted near the Serpent River Bridge. Four shots were fired by police and one of the bullets struck Olsen.

Guard Slugged.
Amos, Que., Oct. 4 (CP). – Maurice Fisette, believed to be held by police at Blind River, Ont., after a companion had been killed by police bullets, has been a fugitive from Quebec officers since he strong-armed his way out of jail here July 24.

Serving a 10-year term in St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary for holdup, he had been brought here from the Montreal prison for trial on theft charges. Convicted, he was sentenced to three years, to run concurrently with his previous term.

While awaiting in the town jail for his return to Montreal, Fisette broke out of his cell and scaled the prison wall to freedom. On the way out, he overpowered a guard who tried to stop him.

Some weeks later, he was taken at Portage La Prairie, Man. But just as a pair of provincial detectives were setting out from here to bring him back, word came from the West that he had broken jail again.

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“Identify Prisoner As One Who Beat Way Out At Amos,” Ottawa Citizen. October 4, 1938. Page 23.

Canadian Press

BLIND RIVER, Ont.,  Oct. 4 – Captured Sunday night when police bullets mortally wounded a companion after the theft of a taxi at Sudbury, 80 miles away, a prisoner in jail here was identified today as Morris Fisette alias Gravelle who slugged a guard and escaped from Jail at Amos, Que., July 24.

Fisette, identified by fingerprints had refused constantly since his capture to disclose his identity. He said it was up to police to find out.

Fisette was arrested after Tommy Campbell, Sudbury cab driver, told police at Spanish, half way between Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie, three men who hired him to drive them to Whitefish, stole his cab.

A man who said his was name was Harold Olsen, an escaped convict from Washington D.c., died today in hospital from a bullet wound suffered in a chase after the men deserted the taxi in a ditch near Serpent River bridge. A third man escaped and police are scouring the district for him.

SLUGGED WAY OUT
AMOS, Que., Oct. 4 – Maurice Fisette, held by police at Blind River, Ont., after a companion had been killed by police bullets, has been a fugitive from Quebec officers since he strong-armed his way out of jail here July 24.

Serving a 10-year term in St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary for holdup, he had been brought here from the Montreal prison for trial on theft charges. Convicted, he was sentenced to three years, to run concurrently with his previous term.

While awaiting in the town jail for his return to Montreal, Fisette broke out of his cell and scaled the prison wall to freedom. On the way out, he overpowered a guard who tried to stop him.

Some weeks later, he was taken at Portage La Prairie, Man. But just as a pair of provincial detectives were setting out from here to bring him back, word came from the West that he had broken jail again. 

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“‘Bling Pig’ Raid,” Kingston Daily Standard. September 4, 1912. Page 01.

Heavy Sentences Were Imposed On Ten Offenders at Cobalt.

Cobalt, Sept. 4. – The biggest ‘blind pig’ raid in months occurred when the Provincial police rounded up thirteen alleged illegal sellers of liquor here and in South Lorraine. Yesterday ten convictions were registered with Inspector George Morrison, prosecuting. Three cases were adjourned till to-day.

The following are the sentences imposed yesterday: Patrick Redmond, $200 or six months in jail; Alphonse Beland, four months in jail; Spiers Romanus, $100; George Peterson, four months: Luke Farrell, four months; John Major, $300 or nine months; Peter Peterson, $100; Joseph Perreault, ten months; Fred Paquette, $300; Bert Deschenes, twelve months.

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“No Jury For The Inquest Being Held Today,” Sudbury Star. August 21, 1918. Page 03.

Witnessses to Tell Story of the Shooting of Defaulter.

The inquest into the death of Cyprien Gareau, the Blezard Valley defaulter shot by Dominion Officer Tougher at a farm house last Saturday morning, is taking place this afternoon before Coroner Dr. W. R. Patterson, without a jury. The body has been at Henry’s morgue since last Saturday.

SHOT AT UNDERTAKERS.
Undertakers who went to the farm house at Blezard last Saturday afternoon report having been shot at from the bush, near the house, several times, while several automobiles have also reported that they have heard bullets whiz by in the same locality. While the police do not place much credence on the reports of shooting, which they attribute more or less to imagination, the undertakers are emphatic they heard the reports of the rifles and the whiz of the bullets close to their rig. It was while returning with the body that the shooting incident occurred.

OFFICERS GIVEN SAFE CONDUCT
In direct contrast to the visit of the undertakers is that on Monday afternoon o provincial officers headed by Inspector Storie. The inspector reports he drove purposely past the spot from which the shots were supposed to come, and all was peace and quiet. This may be accounted for, however, by the fact that a brother of one of the defaulters who is at large was in the vehicle with the officer.

There seems to be no doubt but what there was shooting. The undertakers say they met several soldiers, belonging to the district and home on harvest leave. The soldiers took to the bush as soon as the firing started. They later emerged with their tunics under their arms.

STORIES VARY SOMEWHAT
Visits to the scene of the shooting were paid by Inspector Storie on Monday and again on Tuesday. An investigation was conducted and witnesses subpoenaed for the inquest. The Inspector found that the stories of the Dominion Police and that of the relatives of the deceased man tally up fairly well, except that there is a difference of opinion as to who fired the first shot. Those at the farm house say the officers fired first, but this is not borne out by the investigation. 

FOUR BULLET MARKS
There are four bullet marks inside the house. These bear out the story of the Dominion officers that the first shot, from which Officer Tougher bears powder marks on his face, passed through the roof of the lean-to of the house, where the deceased man was located when Tougher pulled back the curtain. The bullet mark is in the roof. There is also a bullet hole in the front door, which tallies up with the police story that a shot was fired through the closed door at the officers as they were retiring from the house. The next shot was apparently fired by Tougher after the door had been re-opened. This shot passed through the body of the dead man, who was apparently standing in the door of the bedroom, hit a knob on the bedpost and careened off into the wall. There is also a shot in the window sill, also fired from the inside, which so far has not been connected up with the story, unless it was fired to scare the officers away.

MAY GIVE HIMSELF UP
Hopes are held out that a younger Gareau, brother of deceased, also a defaulter, will give himself up before the inquest. Relatives have given the police assurance that they will advise the young man to take this course, and it was hoped that he would surrender on Monday, but the plan did not materialize. The authorities were given assurance that he would be produced before August 24th, the last day of pardon extended by the Minister of Justice.

Crown Attorney Miller is acting for the Crown at the inquest and Mr. B. Boutet for the family of the deceased. Mr. Boutet has also paid a visit to the scene of the shooting.

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