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“Convict’s Thrilling Escape: Leaps From Fast Train,” Toronto Globe. November 25, 1918. Page 08.

Man With Bad Record in Toronto Fools County Constable and Flees Near Shannonville – Recaptured at Napanee

John Gowans, who was on his way to Kingston penitentiary, where he was to commence a second five-year sentence for housebreaking, escaped from the custody of County Constable Frank Brown near Shannonville on Saturday morning. Gowans made his escape by obtaining permission to go to a lavatory, and then by leaping from the window of the train after he had slammed the door upon Constable Brown.

Gowans was the housebreaker who entered the house of the widow of the late Dr. Fenton, and assaulted her when she endeavored to hold him until the arrival of police. He was later arrested, and only recently completed his sentence. Judge Winchester on Wednesday sentenced Gowans to five years’ imprisonment upon convictions registered against him for housebreaking in Parkdale.

The convict was recaptured at Napanee on Saturday just before midnight.

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“Jack Lett Is Given Ten Years In Prison,” Toronto Star. November 22, 1918. Page 02.

Canadian Express Co. Robber Also Pleads Guilty to Robbing Union Bank.

Jack Lett, the embryo highwayman who robbed the Canadian Express Co. of $20,000 on October 23, was to-day given ten years in the penitentiary. He withdrew his plea of not guilty and pleaded guilty to robbing the Union Bank and stealing an automobile. For these crimes he also received five and three years respectively. The sentences are to run concurrently.

His brother, Walter Lett, also withdrew his plea of not guilty and pleaded guilty to having received $1,000, which he knew to be stolen. This money he gave to his wife. He was let go on remanded sentence provided he gives $1,000 security and finds two other securities of $1,000 each.

James Gordon Dougall is to spend not less than one year and not more than two years in the Ontario Reformatory.

In addressing Jack Lett, Chief Justice Meredith said: ‘I have no desire to add to the severity of your sentence by lecturing you. I regret that I have no testimony as to your mental capabilities, so I must judge you as I have seen you. The main trouble with you seems to be inordinate vanity. In opening your case your counsel has pictured you as a pigeon-chested, varicose-veined misfit, who is undeveloped both physically and mentally.

Looking Into the Future.
‘Your picture of yourself is that of a bold highwayman. It is to cure you of this delusion that you are to be disciplined. If you were allowed to go free that gun of yours might go off some time, and then some judge would be talking about Jack Lett being hanged by the neck until he was dead.

‘If there had only been a ‘man’ in that express car who would have given you a good thrashing, taken away your pistol, and thrown you out you would have been cured. The only thing to do now is to seek to cure you by the panacea of hard labor.

‘Jack Lett, you were not made for a highwayman. You were given freedom of that express car. Afterwards you went wandering about like a frightened child, and impressed the first man whom you met as a thief. Moreover you left your plunder right under the very nose of those who suspected you. 

‘Walter Lett, you certainly did not do all you could to save your brother, and let me tell you the offence to which you plead guilty is a serious one.

Severe Words For Dougall.
‘James Gordon Dougall, your case has caused me a deal of thought. You were the chief clerk, you held a responsible position, and you can understand that your connection with this crime will cast suspicion upon your associates and inferiors. You were leading a disgraceful life. Don’t you think one should be horsewhipped for a life of that kind.

‘You were found guilty of the lesser offence, but a jury might well have found you the instigator in this farce.’

All the prisoners refused to say anything in their defence, and received their sentences in silence.

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“Jack Lett, Dougall Both Found Guilty,” Toronto Star. November 22, 1918. Page 05.

Mercy Plea on Behalf of Former Chief Clerk at Union Station.

After considering their verdict for 40 minutes the jury yesterday returned a verdict of guilty in the cases of Jack Lett and James Gordon Dougall with a strong recommendation for mercy in the case of the later. During the trial Jack Lett’s manner was one of cold indifference, while that of Dougall was broken-hearted. These two young men were charged with the robbery from the Canadian Express Company of $20,000 on October 23, Douglass was remanded until to-day or sentence. Then other charges will be preferred against the Lett brothers; Walter Lett is charged with receiving $1,000 from his brother which he knew to be stolen; Jack Lett is charged with robbing the Union Bank and stealing an auto.

At the afternoon sitting of the trial of James Gordon Dougall, charged with conspiracy in connection with the Canadian Express Co., $20,000 robbery, the young man’s father gave character evidence. Dougall, Jr., is 32 years of age and was chief clerk at the Old Union Station. His father commended, ‘My boy–’ and then broke down.

Chief Justice Meredith: ‘Your boy was always a good boy, gave you no trouble and you cannot speak too highly of his character.’

‘Oh yes, yes,’ said Mr. Dougall.

Gordon Dougall, sitting in the dock, hung his head and wiped his eyes.

Mr. Dougall, Sr., has lived in Barrie for 60 years. Gordon Dougall came to Toronto nine years ago.

Frank Denton, K.C., addressed the jury briefly. He admitted that his client, Jack Lett, was guilty of the crime, but made a plea on the ground of mental and physical weakness. Jack Lett has recently undergone several operations. Mr. Denton wanted to know why Cox, the Grand Trunk conductor who gave Lett the information regarding how the express money was handled, was not in the dock.

On behalf of his client, James Gordon Dougall, W. K. Murphy urged that he had taken no part in the crime, but that he had merely listened to the plans of his friend with whom he had grown up.

Mr. T. C. Agar, the Crown counsel, dismissed the case of Jack Lett in a few sentences since his counsel had admitted that he was guilty, and confined his address to the jury to the case of James Gordon Dougall.

His Lordship: ‘Mr. agar, all the points you presented were taken up from the statement of Dougall to the police.’

T. C. Agar: ‘I think so, my Lord.’

His Lordship: ‘Then, if he had kept his mouth shut there would have been no evidence against him?’

Referring to the messengers who held up their hands, His Lordship said: ‘I call them messengers, I cannot call them men.’

The jury retired at 3.15 pm.

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“Witnesses Identify Jack Lett As Robber,” Toronto Star. November 21, 1918. Page 02.

Two Express Messengers Say He Made Them Kneel in Car and Gagged Them,

THEN TOOK $20,000

Hewitt Ave. Residents Say He Called at Their Houses, Carrying the Plunder.

John Lett, Walter Lett and James Gordon Dougall were all three charged to-day before Chief Justice R. M. Meredith, with stealing $20,000 from the Canadian Express Company on October 23, on a train leaving Toronto for Hamilton. Frank Denton, K.C., is defending the Lett brothers, and U.K. Murphy is defending James Gordon Dougall. Jack Lett is charged with the actual commission of the crime.

George Williamson, the messenger who was robbed, said, in his evidence: ‘Just after we had left the Union Station a man got in the side door of the express car. The door was closed but not latched. He pointed a revolver at us and told us to kneel down and put up our hands. He ordered my assistant, Wilson, to lie down, then he swore at him and pushed him down, tying and gagging him.’

Both Went on Their Knees
The gags and ropes were produced and identified. 

Judge Meredith: ‘What were you doing at that time?’ Williamson: ‘I was down on my knees. Then he ordered me to open the strong box. I was tied and he helped himself. Before he jumped from the train he said: ‘If you open your mouth or say anything about this, I’ll get you again.’

Judge Meredith: ‘Did you have a weapon?’ ‘Yes, in my hip pocket.’

‘Couldn’t you use it?’ ‘No.’

‘Not when you were kneeling down saying your prayers all the time?’

Williamson and Wilson, the other messenger, who was called next, said that they got loose just west of New Toronto. Twenty thousand dollars was taken, and $100 in silver.

Both Identify John Lett
Both messengers identified Jack Lett as the man who robbed them.

W. J. Greenway, 37 Hewitt avenue, and Mrs. Roberston, 39 Hewitt avenue, both identified Jack Lett as the man who called on them on the morning of Oct. 23. He carried a paarcel wrapped in a black apron. He asked Greenway if he had a garage to rent, and if he knew anyone who had a room to rent. Greenway referred him to Mrs. Robertson, next door. Lett asked if she were a widow, and asked her for a room.

Mrs. Robertson: ‘I told him to come back in the evening. Mr. Greenway phoned me not to take him. He asked me if he could leave his parcel until evening. He said he was a printer and that these were his books. Afterwards, I became suspicious and opened the parcel. It contained sealed parcels. One of them was open, and I saw $2 bills. The man came back and rang the bell and tried to get in, but I had locked the doors. Then the police came and he ran away.

Found $8,800 Hid in Park.
Detective Taylor was called. He told of taking Jack Lett to High Park and finding $8,876.70 in a Canadian Express bag. He went to the home of Mrs. Walter Lett, 534A, St Clair avenue west, and recovered $1,000 from her. The police still keep this money, although they have turned over the rest to the express company.

Detective McConnell, who arrested the Lett brothers on November 5, told of finding $99.90 in silver in the Howard High Park Methodist Church.

Dougall’s Connection
The Inspector of Detectives, George Kennedy, gave evidence. He told of his interview with James Gordon Dougall.

‘Dougall said that he had known the Letts since he was a boy, that he had been raised by them. He said he saw Lett six weeks before at the Duke of Connaught Hotel at Hamilton. They discussed the possibility of robbing a jewelry store in Hamilton, which displayed a tray of diamonds in the window. They even walked down and looked at the window. Dougall said they would be caught if they broke the window. They also talked of robbing a Hamilton bank. They walked back to the hotel and met a railwayman named Cox. Cox said he knew an express messenger who left the Union Station often carrying between $60,000 and $100,000.

‘Later John Lett called up Dougall and asked if he knew a boarding place convenient to the Union Station. Dougall suggested a hotel at the corner of Spadina and King. Lett went there and registered under the name of Miller. Dougall admitted that he was to get some of the booty.

‘Again Jack Lett called up Dougall and asked him to get two keys made for a Ford and a McLaughlin car. Dougall said he hadn’t time to do it.

‘On the morning of the robbery Jack Lett called up Dougall, said he was speaking from a church, and asked Dougall to meet him. Dougall refused, say he had an appointment to go to Gravenhurst with a young lady that morning.’

James Henry, the police court stenographer, read the interview that he took down between Inspector Kennedy and Dougall. Dougall said that Jack Lett had previously robbed a bank and stolen a McLaughlin car in Hamilton.

Walter Lett’s Part.
Inspector Kennedy told of questioning Walter Lett:

‘He admitted bringing his brother to Toronto from Barrie and giving him a captain’s uniform which he, Walter, had worn. Walter Lett said he enlisted early in the war in a Forestry battalion, obtained his captaincy, and went to England.

‘He also admitted receiving $1,000 from his brother, which he knew was stolen. This money he gave to his wife.

‘Jack Lett, when I questioned him, admitted holding up the messengers and taking the money. He said that when he got to the roadway he expected to meet Dougall and Walter Lett, and when they were not there he was frightened. He hid some of the money in High Park and left a bag of silver in the High Park Methodist Church, from where ‘phoned to Dougall. He said he went to Mrs. Robertson’s, then left another parcel there. When the detectives came he ran back to High Park and hod. A man with a car drove past. He held him up, took his car and drove to Medhurst, where he abandoned the car. He purchased a ticket to North Bay, and got off at McTeir, and returned. After the robbery Walter saw Jack at Barrie and received $1,000 from him. He also tried to get his brother over to the United States.’

Walter Lett Acquitted.
Walter Lett was acquitted of the charge of conspiracy to rob the company, at the direction of Chief Justice Meredith, because there was no evidence against him, but Walter Lett is still held on the charge of receiving stolen money.

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“Three Go For Trial In Train Hold-Up Case,” Toronto Star. November 15, 1918. Page 04.

John Lett, Walter Lett, and Gordon Dougal Committed on Story to Detectives.

On their own admissions as given to Detective Mitchell after being cautioned, John Lett, Capt. Walter Lett, and Gordon Dougal, were committed for trial by Col. Denison in the Police Court to-day. The Crown submitted that it was not a case for bail, and the trio remain in custody.

The men are the alleged conspirators in the hold-up near Sunnyside on October 23 when $20,000 was stolen from messengers of the Canadian Express Company.

‘John Lett, when cautioned,’ Detective Mitchell testified, ‘admitted holding up the two messengers at the point of a revolver, taking $20,000, and jumping off the train at Sunnyside, with the money.’

‘Where was it, in a box or safe?’ queried the colonel.

‘Safe, I think,’ replied Mitchell.

‘He admitted throwing a parcel of it away in the High Park district. I later accompanied him there and found the package. It contained $9,000.’

Walter Lett, the detective continued, admitted going to Barrie the day before the arrest and receiving $1,000 from John Lett, knowing it to have been stolen. He further admitted that his brother had come to his farm at Jordan and had told him of the proposed hold-up. He further said that the day after the robbery he came to Toronto to look for John, his brother.

What Dougal Says.
Gordon Dougal admitted, after being cautioned, that John Lett and he met the night prior to the robbery to discuss the robbery. It was arranged then that Dougal was to meet him the morning of the robbery at Sunnyside, which he admitted leaving the house to do. The meeting did not take place. He further admitted after arriving at the Union Station he had a telephone message from Lett about 8 a.m. – a hour after the robbery. Lett told him that he had got the money. Lett said that he was phoning from a church and wanted to know why Dougall didn’t meet him. He told him he had got the money and had hidden it under a rock pile.

In the church the police a black club bag, which belonged to Williamson, the Canadian Express messenger. The bag contained $99.90 in silver and papers belonging to the company.

Cross-examined by Frank Denton, K.C., counsel for the Letts, Detective Mitchell replied that the admissions included references to another man.

‘Did not the admissions allege that this man was the brains behind the hold-up – that he prompted John Lett and Dougal?’ ‘Yes.’

‘Was there any admission that Dougal was to get any of the money?’ asked Mr. W. K. Murphy, counsel for Dougal.

‘That was not suggested.’

‘If the Crown Attorney of the other court wants the other man he is able to get him,’ Col. Denison commented.

Find Reservoirs
The crocks of exhilaration cached beneath the sidewalk belonging to Mrs. Annie Portchuk, Adelaide street west, did not waste their sweetness on the desert air. According to police evidence in the Women’s Court to-day, they formed the reservoir from which the pop bottles which the lady retailed at $3.50 per, were filled. This marks the second time within the week that the Porichucks have moved in court circles. The record of to-day’s visit includes the fine, $200 and costs or three months.

Murdock Henry had a clothes sideline. He pleaded guilty to-day to augmenting his wardrobe with some $50 worth of garments to which he had no right. Most of these, the police stated, had since been recovered. The colonel was told that the quick change of costume set had been Henry’s first bad break. The colonel gave him the right to don the becoming Jail Farm uniform for the next 15 days.

Found guilty of defrauding Mrs. Dorothy Whitaker, wife of a soldier overseas, out of five $100 Victory Bonds, and of stealing an automobile the property of Jas. O’Leary and Ed. Murphy, W. F. Grimwood goes to the Ontario Reformatory.

Mrs. Whitaker stated that she had given him the Victory Bonds, 1917 issue, last November to put in a safe in the Bank of Montreal. She had since asked for them and couldn’t get them. In connection with these, Mr. S.N. Gibbons testified to having sold a motor car to Grimwood for $700. ‘In part payment for this, I received four 1917 Victory Bonds from Grimwood,’ Mr. Gibbons said. Mrs. Whittaker further remarked that she had given Grimwood $1,700 in Government pay checks and her own savings. This she gave him, she said, to invest in the Mossop Hotel, which he told her he was to convert into a club.

Two offenders against the O.T.A. got docked $300 and costs or three months in as many minutes. Harry Hurd was a retailer. He kept the bowl flowing on the broad highway. He that ran might drink, if he stopped and paid $1 for the quencher. John Parker added to the H. C. of L. He likewise retailed. His wee deoch and doris cost $5.50 per. Art Penn both makes and sells. ‘He has his own labels and makes a profitable business of it,’ said the Crown Attorney. Fined $800 and costs or five months.

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“$9,000 In Bills Found By Police,” Toronto Globe. November 7, 1918. Page 09.

Practically All Stolen From Canadian Express Co. Now Recovered

Covered over with leaves a bag containing $9,000 in bills was found by detectives yesterday afternoon in the yard at the rear of a house on Garden avenue. With this find the police have recovered all but $150 of the $20,000 stolen in the Buffalo express hold-up on October 23. The remaining $150 is alleged to have been spent by John Lett in travelling expenses.

Shackled with handcuffs, John Lett was taken by detectives through the residential section of High Park yesterday to try and locate the spot where he left the money. Before leaving headquarters he drew a map of where he thought he had gone after jumping off the train at Sunnyside. This diagram took the officers to Garden avenue, and after a lengthy search they found the spot. The bag had been thrown over a fence, and was lying between the fence and a chicken coop. It had not been disturbed, and the leaves that partly covered it from view had been blown over it by the wind.
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“Letts and Dougall Get A Remand,” Toronto Globe. November 7, 1918. Page 09.

Alleged Train Bandits Will Appear in Court Next Wednesday

John Lett, the alleged train bandit, Captain Walter Lett, his brother, and J. G. B. Dougall, Chief Clerk of the G. T. R. ticket office, appeared yesterday in the Police Court, and were remanded in custody till Wednesday, November 13th. All three are charged with conspiring to rob the Canadian Express Company of $20,000.

Besides the charge of conspiracy, three charges of robbery were preferred against John Lett as follows: Robbing the express messengers of $20,00, robbing H. S. Fergus of his motor car, and robbing the Union Bank, corner of Church and Wellesley streets of $1,200 last May.

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“Three Men Are Arrested,” Toronto Globe. November 6, 1918. Page 09.

Face Charges in Connection With Express Car Robbery

UNION BANK CASE, TOO

With the arrest of three men yesterday, the police say they have apprehended the persons implacted in the Canadian Express daylight train robbery, when $20,000 in money was stolen on October 23 last on a Grand Trunk train en route from Toronto to Buffalo, the express messengers in charge of the car being ‘held up’ by a bandit between the Union Station and Sunnyside. John Lett, alleged to be the man who robbed the messengers, is also charged with robbing the Church street branch of the Union Bank of Canada on May 2, and obtaining the sum of $1,200. His brother, Walter Lett, was arrested at a downtown hotel, and is held on a charge of conspiracy, and of receiving stolen goods. Early yesterday afternoon Gordon Dougall, 97 Spencer avenue, a clerk in the Grand Trunk ticket office at the Union Station, was also arrested on a charge of conspiracy.

Inspector John Miller of the Provincial Police, Detectives Mitchell, McConnell and Nichols, spent all Monday night searching for John Lett and his brother. Walter was arrested early Tuesday morning, but it was nearly 7 o’clock in the morning when they caught John Lett, who was wearing the uniform of a C Captain in the Canadian army, and had a revolver in his pocket. He made no resistance.

Three Charges of Robbery
Three charges of robbery, with violence, will face John Lett when he appears in Police Court this morning. He will be charged with holding up the two express messengers, George Williamson and William Wilson, and with stealing a motor car from Mr. H. S. Fergus in High Park, under threat of shooting, and with robbing the Union Bank of $1,200. The fourth charge against the prisoner is conspiracy. It is alleged by the police that Dougall, a chief clerk with the Grand Trunk for eight years, conspired with the two Letts to commit the train robbery.

Dougall was to have received a share of the money, the police state, but, owning to John Lett having to make a hurried exit from the city to avoid arrest, did not get his quota.

John Lett, according to the inspector, did the work of holding up the messengers alone, and hid the stolen money. It is charged that he handed over $1,000 to his brother, and, after leaving over $7,00 in a house in Parkdale, buried $9,000 in the residential section of High Park. After getting rid of the money, it is alleged John Lett commandeered Mr. Fergus’ car in High Park, at the point of a revolver, and drove to Midhurst, where the car was abandoned. From Midhurst Lett purchased a ticket to North Bay, and after riding on the line as far as McTier, got off and doubled back to a nearby town. Here he is said by the police to have put on the military uniform of his brother, Walter. He had been out of Toronto until Monday night. The police learned of his coming to the city, and a close lookout was kept for him. Walter Lett was an officer in the army, and went overseas with the 122nd battalion.

$3,100 is Recovered.
Three thousand one hundred dollars was recovered by the detectives yesterday after the arrests. One hundred dollars was found on the top of a boiler of a Methodist church in the west end of the city. Detectives spent yesterday afternoon searching for the remaining amount that was hidden in the High Park district. The police say that they are unable to find the exact spot where the money was placed, and are doubtful that it will ever be found by them. The bills were in small denominations, and it is feared that they have already been found.

John and Walter Lett are the sons of a Barrie family. Recently Walter has been conducting a small fruit farm near Jordan. They are both six feet in height. John is 32 years of age, and Walter 30. Dougall is also a tall, heavy-set man of 28 years of age. Frank Denton, K.C., has been retained to appear on behalf of John and Walter Lett.

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“Two Prisoners for Pen.” Kingston Daily Standard. October 8, 1912. Page 08.

Deputy Sheriff Jarvis, Toronto, arrived in the city on Saturday afternoon with two prisoners for the penitentiary. They were Bernard McMahon, who will serve three years for assault, and Harry Beatty, who will serve the same length of time for theft.
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“Italian Sent Down.” Kingston Daily Standard, October 8, 1912. Page 08.

An Italian, Rocco Lombardo, was sentenced to two and a half years in Portsmouth Penitentiary for a vicious assault on two fellow country-men at Toronto. Both the injured men were in court and exhibited the marks of the wounds which had been inflicted.

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“Jail Farm ‘Trusty’ Beaten Up on Street,” Toronto Globe. September 8, 1916. Page 06.

Hendry Rodebar, 94 ½ Front Street east, a ‘trusty’ at the Jail Farm, was brutally beaten last night on Front street east by Timothy Kelly, 18 Milne street, who was a prisoner on the farm while Rodebar was serving his term. Constable Jarvis came upon Kelly, who was ‘putting the boots’ to Rodebar in the most approved waterfront fashion, to the apparent satisfaction of lodgers from the ten-cent bed-houses. Rodebar is alleged to have talked too freely to the prison officials when he was on the farm.

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“Say ‘Phil the Jew’ Is Morphine King,” Toronto Globe. September 1, 1916. Page 08.

Two Persons Arrested Are Described as Wrecks of Morphine Ring

Murray Hebert, aged twenty-three, 568 Dufferin street, and Earl Lankin, 115 McGill street, both of whom are described by the police as wrecks of the morphine ring, which is controlled by one known only as ‘Phil, the Jew,’ were taken into custody yesterday afternoon by Morality Constable Kerr and Boyd, and charged with having morphine in their possession.

Their own admissions, according to the police, substantiate the charges made. Hebert is said to have been a bank teller at Port Colborne, who lost his employment through the habit of which he has been a victim for the past six months. He declared that the source of his supply was Lankin.

Lankin was arrested in Simpson’s store. It is claimed that he has used morphine for the past fourteen months. He admitted that he knew a score or more of drug fiends, all of whom are known to the police, and that he obtained his morphine from ‘Phil, the Jew.’

This stranger mentioned by all fiends since their arrest is not a fictitious character, according to the police. None knows him by any other than this name. Within the past six weeks, the nine who have been charged with the illegal possession, use or sale of morphine have hesitatingly   admitted that they obtained their supply from this person.

John McConkey, long since disowned by his father, who resides in Toronto, is a third victim of the ring. He is now awaiting trial.

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“Today is the 85th anniversary of the Christie Pits Riot, a pivotal moment in the fight against fascism and Nazism in Toronto and Canada in the early 1930s.

The riot saw Jews and Italians take direct action in self-defence against a Toronto “Swastika Club” that was displaying swastika banners and inciting hatred during a baseball game in the Christie Pits park.

Their courage in standing up to these racists helped to stop the growth of Swastika Clubs and represented a serious setback for the city’s fascists and Nazis at a time when antisemitism was dangerously on the rise.

This terrible history of overt antisemitism in the city and country is mostly forgotten now, though a close friend of mine came across a striking example of it in newspaper archives that occurred within my own community, Long Branch, also in 1933.

Long Branch is now a fully developed part of Etobicoke, a suburb of Toronto that borders Mississauga in the west of the metropolis.

But in 1933 it was a separate, sleepy community that had many cottagers and summer vistors in it due to its lake front aspect and its famous beaches.

As the Globe and Mail article relates, the municipality of Long Branch decided to ban all Jews not from Long Branch (and there were likely not many of those) from its beaches. Despite the obvious racism at work the town’s Deputy Reeve Charles Brock tried to claim it had nothing to do with race!

This history of racism and resistance resonates again now especially with a US administration openly sympathetic to white supremacist narratives,  the rise of the far right across Europe and the growth of homegrown fascist and racist groups in Toronto and Canada.”

– Michael Laxer, ““Ban on Jews” – A 1933 antisemitic beach edict in Long Branch reminds of Toronto’s past on the anniversary of the Christie Pits Riot.The Left Chapter, August 16, 2018.  

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‘Struck His Wife On Busy Street,” Toronto Star. August 16, 1910. Page 02.

Has Been Paying Attention to Another Woman – To Jail for 30 Days.

CASES IN THE POLICE COURT

Doctor Accused of Bigamy – Brothers Charged With Assault and Robbery.

Even from the court room above it became quite apparent that Wm. A. Fulton had radical ideas of his own as to cell decorum. Alternately he addressed fellow-prisoners in ministerial language or spouted poetry, and guffaws could be heard in greeting. Once up he cooled perceptibly.

Constable Reburn had arrested him for disorderly conduct at the station.

‘Shaking people,’ said that officer, and Fulton waits a week for a doctor’s examination.

Herchall Hertz took her insanity conviction badly. She protested, pitifully, so that all might hear, and two constables were needed to take her downstairs.

Mary Greer, aged 80, will go over to the House of Providence.

George Parker and James McDonald, drunken, pay a dollar and costs each.

Told Troubles to Policeman.
Careless of the man he accosted on the street, backed up by a hard luck tale, Philip Martin landed in Esther street police station. Unwittingly he had recounted his need for money to Provincial Constable O’Connor, so the charge was vagrancy.

He is too young in appearance for such a charge, but he pleaded guilty. Besides, he had been seen to follow a drunken man. Ten dollars and costs or 60 days.

Claiming that the gun he left in the Union Station waiting room had disappeared, William McLean, of Midland, on his way to Winnipeg, caused the arrest of Robert Dalton, fellow-traveler from Victoria Harbor. Constable Reburn locked up, for the rifled was found in his possession.

Ignorance of the circumstances was taken as a plea for not guilty.

‘Dalton claimed it at first,’ stated the officer.

Drunkenness was then promptly rung in as an excuse, but Magistrate Denison has heard it many times before, Dalton’s trip will be interrupted. He goes to jail for 30 days.

Accused of Shoplifting.
Nellie Newman, charged with shoplifting from Eaton’s, was remanded till Monday next without plea of election. The articles complained of are, a chatelaine and one lady’s sweater.

For Striking His Wife.
When several pedestrians saw Herbert Foster strike his wife in the face on the street at Yonge and Queen, they gave chase, but Foster boarded a street car and left the woman lying on the street. Detectives Guthrie and Murray came along and followed and arrested him on a charge of aggravated assault. The couple live at 99 Jarvis street.

‘Why?’ questioned Crown Attorney Corley.

‘There’s another woman in the case, and I kept following him.’

‘No, no,’ Foster shook his head.

The wife stated circumstances of their domestic life, which held Foster up to censure and only a threat from the magistrate forced Foster into an admission that the second woman had wrecked the peace of their family. He goes to jail for 30 days.

Farmers at the Market.
The Humber Bay Farmers, E. Powitt, and W. Griggsby, charged with a breach of the law defining the sale of farm produce in that they sold produce on the St. Lawrence Market not in barrels, bags, or bushels, but in broken portions of those measures, were given a second remand. Their counsel, A. R. Hassard, had not yet carried out his intention to go before the Board of Control to ask for a change in the regulation. He stated he would carry his appeal before those officials at today’s meeting.

Will Support Wife.
William Wells named bright prospects. Though he had not yet contributed to the support of the wife, Elizabeth Wells, as stipulated by the court on July 27, he would go out on the road and sell stuff. He is a traveler.

The second chance was given.

Bought the Harness.
To look up the man who sold him the harness parts for 30 cents, Herbert Bennett was given a remand. A witness was produced, who bought the goods from Bennett for eighty cents, and originally they were stolen from J. Battalta. The charge was theft.

On a conviction of gross indecency Charles F. Brown will go to jail for sixty days.

Ethel Gibson was quite frank: she did not deny stealing 5 ½ yards of ribbon from the Jas. Vise Company. It was her first offence. She promised not to repeat it, so a chance was given.

Michael Tellman, convicted of the theft of jewelry from Samuel Siegel, goes to jail for ten days.

Lost a $20 Bill.
David Stein declared he mistook a twenty dollar bill for a two and handed it to Loretta O’Hara in change from his auction mart in Yonge street, so charged her with theft.

But there had been many customers, the girl knew nothing of the twenty, and T. C. Robinette produced her bank book which showed accurate accounting to correspond with her funds. The charge was dismissed.

Doctor on Bigamy Charge.
Though yesterday afternoon when detained by Inspector Kennedy of the Morality Department, on a charge of bigamy, Dr. Herbert Edward Shepherd, who has practised for a number of years at 15 Gloucester street, admitted three marriages, he claimed to be innocent of the bigamy charge, on the grounds that the first marriage had been dissolved, and that he had been separated from the second wife for more than seven years before contracting the third marriage.

Complaint was received rom the first wife, Mabel Louisa Saunders, who was marred in Barrie, 1869, and who is now living a Duck Lake, Sask., with some of their children. It is alleged that in July, 1883, he left her with six children, and that later he married a second time, and that he married Lucy A. Moore of Goderich, in September, 1908. This wife was living with him when the arrest was made.

Normal Heyd, appearing as counsel, pleaded not guilty, and offered as explanation the statement that a divorce had been granted on December 18, 1867, in Michigan, where the doctor was practising at the time.

Crown Attorney Corley merely offered to put in the two marriages certificates as evidence, and Mr. Heyd consented to waive examination of witnesses, and asked to go over before a jury for trial.

The same bail of $1,000, given by Mr. J. Hazelton, stands, and the case will come before the next assizes.

Brothers Accused.
Lords and Abraham Pancer, brothers, of 47 Chesnut street, tailors, were charged with assaulting Arthur Swartz of 122 Edward street, in Edward street Saturday night, and robbing him of $130. The plea was not guilty, no evidence was taken, bail of $200 being accepted for hearing on the 18th.

Complaining there were pickings from the ice wagons, and that an example was necessary, the Belle Ewart Ice Company caused the arrest of Henry Street, a teamster.

‘I took a little that was left over from the route,’ admitted Street, ‘but it went to pay for shoeing the horses, sharpening ice tongs, axe, and to pay for my dinner.’

‘You should have told the company,’ advised the magistrate, but the charge was dismissed.

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“Robbed Visitor, Goes to Prison,” Toronto Star. August 5, 1910. Page 10.

Nine Months for Edward Walsh – The Money Goes Back to His Victim

CASES IN THE POLICE COURT

George Empey Went Back to His Former Boarding House and Stole $42/
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Because the bills found on Edward Walsh corresponded with those taken from Thomas White, a Californian, Walsh will go to the Central for nine months. It was some days ago that the charge was laid. White had been met at the station by two strangers, drinks followed, then he slept in a downtown hotel, and $245 disappeared from his pocket. The bills were on the First National Bank of Los Angles, and $150 of the same bank were found on Walsh by Detective Taylor. White gets the roll of $150.

Irene Britton, convicted as frequenter of a house of ill-fame, was fined ten dollars and costs.

Robbed Former Landlord.
Claiming that Grover Empey went back to his former boarding house, 188 Spadina avenue, entered during the night and stole $42, the proprietor, John Cansaul, pressed the charge against him in this morning’s Police Court.

‘Took it while I was sleeping,’ complained Cansaul, and the young man did not deny it.

He goes to the Central for four months, and any money found goes back to the owner.

Court Visitor Locked Up.
Herscharn Hertz, for many weeks a familiar figure about the court room as spectator, has been taken into custody, and will be examined by a doctor.

Ernest Carter was remanded a week on two charges of theft, $30 from A. E. Hockins, and a gold ring from Mrs. R. J. Moyes. To the theft of the former amount from his employer, the plea was guilty, but the boy’s mother was in court to press for leniency. 

They Were Acquitted.
‘He didn’t say anything to me about borrowing a few feeds of oats,’ said George Brennan, flatly contradicting the story of Ernest Amos, who was charged jointly with Charles Howard with the theft of a bag of eats from George Stevenson.

It was one to one on the evidence, for Howard had not heard the conversation. No records were against the two young men, so the charges were dismissed.

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“An Employment Bureau In Court,” Toronto Star. August 5, 1910. Page 05.

Police Will Probe It – One of the Patrons Says He Was Victimized.

ASSAULT ON A CONSTABLE

Keeps Edward Gibson on Short Fare at the Jail for a Month More.

Before Magistrate Denison to-day John C. Smith and A. C. Dean got $3.05 from him under misrepresentation, so the charge was theft. Dean conducts an employment agency in Front street and Smith stated that he paid over his dollar for registration and the balance represented a single ticket to Dundalk, where he was informed there was plenty of work.

‘Two of us went,’ continued Smith, ‘but when we got there Dean’s agent laughed at us and said there was no work.’

‘Better have that looked into,’ instructed the magistrate. ‘It may be a regular occurrence.’

Mr. Corley agreed, and the case stands for a week until Campbell, the Dundalk representative, may be produced as witness.

Edgar Bunker Acquitted.
Who took the book of tickets from the Toronto Ferry Company’s office is yet unsolved. Edgar Bunker has been acquited. Several days ago he gave the name of Wm. Cunningham as the man who had passed the tickets on to him.

Got them in a lodging house on Pearl street in April,’ explained Cunningham. ‘Somebody put them in my kit.’

He is a fireman on the Richelieu line.

‘It’s quite possible,’ put in Detective Taylor. ‘I know the people who go to the house.’

Accordingly, the charge was dismissed.

Assaulted a Policeman.
For the assault which was made on Constable John Donoghue 28 days ago in Sackville street at night Edward Gibson will go back to jail for 30 days. Donoghue spent several days under medical attention; his ear was badly cut by a bottle. The trouble arose while the officer was arresting William Allen on a charge of disorderly conduct. They resisted, and the damage followed. Allen and two others, Robert Barry and Warren Ellis, were fined $10 and costs each for roughness. Gibson, they identified as the wielder of the bottle. In addition to his 28 days, he will spend 30 more in jail.

For an assault upon Edward Scott, bartender of the Claremont House, John Donohue will go to the jail for 40 days.

Back to Buffalo.
The Buffalonian, J. R. Smith, whom Constable Koster followed through a cellar window at 53 St. George street at five o’clock in the morning a week ago, has promised to vacate Toronto. With a chance, he would go right across the border, for he had only gone in for a sleep. Nothing was missing so the chance was forthcoming.

A Horse in Bad Shape.
Adolphe Meyers will have to submit his horse to a medical examination Constable Carlyle had found the animal suffering and laid a charge of cruelty to animals. The nose, he said, was inflamed, the animal fell down apparently from suffocation, it ‘had been beaten unmercifully,’ and was given no food but grass, which it could not eat on account of the condition of its throat.

Magistrate Denison suggested shooting but a veterinary will be called instead.

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“A Farm for the Poor of Toronto,” Toronto Star. August 2, 1910. Page 02.

Where Aged, Infirm or Sick People May Be Taken Care of by the City.

COUNCIL GETTING POINTERS

From the Institution at Cleveland – Replace the Present Charities.

Will Toronto have an industrial farm like that established at Cleveland, O., seven years ago by ex-Mayor Tom L. Johnson?

Controller Spence and Aldermen John O’Neill and David Spence, who were appointed to deal with the question of establishing an industrial farm here, returned from Cleveland this morning with Property Commissioner Harris, after making an inspection of the institution in connection with that city.

The delegation were much impressed by what they saw, and the information they secured, much of which will be valuable in working out a scheme to establish such a farm in or near this city.

The Cleveland institution is called ‘Cooley Farms,’ after Rev. Dr. Harris Cooley, who planned and effected the organization. It is situated at Warrensville, Ohio, ten miles from the centre of Cleveland, and can be reached by trolley in forty-five minutes. The farm covers a space 2 ½ miles long and ½ miles wide, containing about 1,900 acres of land. The farm is divided into three sections: the infirmary portion, containing 1000 acres, the misdemeanants section, of 800 acres, and the cemetery of 60 acres.

The infirmary cares for curable tuberculosis patients, the harmless insane, and indigents, both sexes being received. One section is devoted to the accommodation of aged people, a separate flat being reserved for husbands and wives, who are permitted to live together. The infirmary can care for 800 people, while the land and buildings devoted to misdemeanants has a capacity of 400.

It is proposed to abolish the workhouse in the city proper, and house all the inmates at the farm.

The greater portion of the land is under cultivation, and the institution is supplied almost wholly with the products of the farm. This, however, does not apply to meat consumption, as comparatively little live stock is raised as yet.

The infirmary and workhouse buildings are widely separated. They are two storeys in height, of cement fireproof construction, roofed with Spanish tile, and are formed with a large oblong space in the centre. In the last-named division armed guards are unknown, their places being taken by farm and mechanical instructors. The men work in the field practically without supervision, except as to methods, and the annual number of escapes since inception average but 7 per cent.

The indeterminate sentence plan is not in vogue, a parole system, which is not regarded as so satisfactory, taking its place. The offender is fined a certain amount and works out the fine at a per diem rate of 60 cents.

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