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“Jack Lett, Dougall Both Found Guilty,” Toronto Star. November 22, 1918. Page 05.

Mercy Plea on Behalf of Former Chief Clerk at Union Station.

After considering their verdict for 40 minutes the jury yesterday returned a verdict of guilty in the cases of Jack Lett and James Gordon Dougall with a strong recommendation for mercy in the case of the later. During the trial Jack Lett’s manner was one of cold indifference, while that of Dougall was broken-hearted. These two young men were charged with the robbery from the Canadian Express Company of $20,000 on October 23, Douglass was remanded until to-day or sentence. Then other charges will be preferred against the Lett brothers; Walter Lett is charged with receiving $1,000 from his brother which he knew to be stolen; Jack Lett is charged with robbing the Union Bank and stealing an auto.

At the afternoon sitting of the trial of James Gordon Dougall, charged with conspiracy in connection with the Canadian Express Co., $20,000 robbery, the young man’s father gave character evidence. Dougall, Jr., is 32 years of age and was chief clerk at the Old Union Station. His father commended, ‘My boy–’ and then broke down.

Chief Justice Meredith: ‘Your boy was always a good boy, gave you no trouble and you cannot speak too highly of his character.’

‘Oh yes, yes,’ said Mr. Dougall.

Gordon Dougall, sitting in the dock, hung his head and wiped his eyes.

Mr. Dougall, Sr., has lived in Barrie for 60 years. Gordon Dougall came to Toronto nine years ago.

Frank Denton, K.C., addressed the jury briefly. He admitted that his client, Jack Lett, was guilty of the crime, but made a plea on the ground of mental and physical weakness. Jack Lett has recently undergone several operations. Mr. Denton wanted to know why Cox, the Grand Trunk conductor who gave Lett the information regarding how the express money was handled, was not in the dock.

On behalf of his client, James Gordon Dougall, W. K. Murphy urged that he had taken no part in the crime, but that he had merely listened to the plans of his friend with whom he had grown up.

Mr. T. C. Agar, the Crown counsel, dismissed the case of Jack Lett in a few sentences since his counsel had admitted that he was guilty, and confined his address to the jury to the case of James Gordon Dougall.

His Lordship: ‘Mr. agar, all the points you presented were taken up from the statement of Dougall to the police.’

T. C. Agar: ‘I think so, my Lord.’

His Lordship: ‘Then, if he had kept his mouth shut there would have been no evidence against him?’

Referring to the messengers who held up their hands, His Lordship said: ‘I call them messengers, I cannot call them men.’

The jury retired at 3.15 pm.

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“Witnesses Identify Jack Lett As Robber,” Toronto Star. November 21, 1918. Page 02.

Two Express Messengers Say He Made Them Kneel in Car and Gagged Them,

THEN TOOK $20,000

Hewitt Ave. Residents Say He Called at Their Houses, Carrying the Plunder.

John Lett, Walter Lett and James Gordon Dougall were all three charged to-day before Chief Justice R. M. Meredith, with stealing $20,000 from the Canadian Express Company on October 23, on a train leaving Toronto for Hamilton. Frank Denton, K.C., is defending the Lett brothers, and U.K. Murphy is defending James Gordon Dougall. Jack Lett is charged with the actual commission of the crime.

George Williamson, the messenger who was robbed, said, in his evidence: ‘Just after we had left the Union Station a man got in the side door of the express car. The door was closed but not latched. He pointed a revolver at us and told us to kneel down and put up our hands. He ordered my assistant, Wilson, to lie down, then he swore at him and pushed him down, tying and gagging him.’

Both Went on Their Knees
The gags and ropes were produced and identified. 

Judge Meredith: ‘What were you doing at that time?’ Williamson: ‘I was down on my knees. Then he ordered me to open the strong box. I was tied and he helped himself. Before he jumped from the train he said: ‘If you open your mouth or say anything about this, I’ll get you again.’

Judge Meredith: ‘Did you have a weapon?’ ‘Yes, in my hip pocket.’

‘Couldn’t you use it?’ ‘No.’

‘Not when you were kneeling down saying your prayers all the time?’

Williamson and Wilson, the other messenger, who was called next, said that they got loose just west of New Toronto. Twenty thousand dollars was taken, and $100 in silver.

Both Identify John Lett
Both messengers identified Jack Lett as the man who robbed them.

W. J. Greenway, 37 Hewitt avenue, and Mrs. Roberston, 39 Hewitt avenue, both identified Jack Lett as the man who called on them on the morning of Oct. 23. He carried a paarcel wrapped in a black apron. He asked Greenway if he had a garage to rent, and if he knew anyone who had a room to rent. Greenway referred him to Mrs. Robertson, next door. Lett asked if she were a widow, and asked her for a room.

Mrs. Robertson: ‘I told him to come back in the evening. Mr. Greenway phoned me not to take him. He asked me if he could leave his parcel until evening. He said he was a printer and that these were his books. Afterwards, I became suspicious and opened the parcel. It contained sealed parcels. One of them was open, and I saw $2 bills. The man came back and rang the bell and tried to get in, but I had locked the doors. Then the police came and he ran away.

Found $8,800 Hid in Park.
Detective Taylor was called. He told of taking Jack Lett to High Park and finding $8,876.70 in a Canadian Express bag. He went to the home of Mrs. Walter Lett, 534A, St Clair avenue west, and recovered $1,000 from her. The police still keep this money, although they have turned over the rest to the express company.

Detective McConnell, who arrested the Lett brothers on November 5, told of finding $99.90 in silver in the Howard High Park Methodist Church.

Dougall’s Connection
The Inspector of Detectives, George Kennedy, gave evidence. He told of his interview with James Gordon Dougall.

‘Dougall said that he had known the Letts since he was a boy, that he had been raised by them. He said he saw Lett six weeks before at the Duke of Connaught Hotel at Hamilton. They discussed the possibility of robbing a jewelry store in Hamilton, which displayed a tray of diamonds in the window. They even walked down and looked at the window. Dougall said they would be caught if they broke the window. They also talked of robbing a Hamilton bank. They walked back to the hotel and met a railwayman named Cox. Cox said he knew an express messenger who left the Union Station often carrying between $60,000 and $100,000.

‘Later John Lett called up Dougall and asked if he knew a boarding place convenient to the Union Station. Dougall suggested a hotel at the corner of Spadina and King. Lett went there and registered under the name of Miller. Dougall admitted that he was to get some of the booty.

‘Again Jack Lett called up Dougall and asked him to get two keys made for a Ford and a McLaughlin car. Dougall said he hadn’t time to do it.

‘On the morning of the robbery Jack Lett called up Dougall, said he was speaking from a church, and asked Dougall to meet him. Dougall refused, say he had an appointment to go to Gravenhurst with a young lady that morning.’

James Henry, the police court stenographer, read the interview that he took down between Inspector Kennedy and Dougall. Dougall said that Jack Lett had previously robbed a bank and stolen a McLaughlin car in Hamilton.

Walter Lett’s Part.
Inspector Kennedy told of questioning Walter Lett:

‘He admitted bringing his brother to Toronto from Barrie and giving him a captain’s uniform which he, Walter, had worn. Walter Lett said he enlisted early in the war in a Forestry battalion, obtained his captaincy, and went to England.

‘He also admitted receiving $1,000 from his brother, which he knew was stolen. This money he gave to his wife.

‘Jack Lett, when I questioned him, admitted holding up the messengers and taking the money. He said that when he got to the roadway he expected to meet Dougall and Walter Lett, and when they were not there he was frightened. He hid some of the money in High Park and left a bag of silver in the High Park Methodist Church, from where ‘phoned to Dougall. He said he went to Mrs. Robertson’s, then left another parcel there. When the detectives came he ran back to High Park and hod. A man with a car drove past. He held him up, took his car and drove to Medhurst, where he abandoned the car. He purchased a ticket to North Bay, and got off at McTeir, and returned. After the robbery Walter saw Jack at Barrie and received $1,000 from him. He also tried to get his brother over to the United States.’

Walter Lett Acquitted.
Walter Lett was acquitted of the charge of conspiracy to rob the company, at the direction of Chief Justice Meredith, because there was no evidence against him, but Walter Lett is still held on the charge of receiving stolen money.

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“Three Go For Trial In Train Hold-Up Case,” Toronto Star. November 15, 1918. Page 04.

John Lett, Walter Lett, and Gordon Dougal Committed on Story to Detectives.

On their own admissions as given to Detective Mitchell after being cautioned, John Lett, Capt. Walter Lett, and Gordon Dougal, were committed for trial by Col. Denison in the Police Court to-day. The Crown submitted that it was not a case for bail, and the trio remain in custody.

The men are the alleged conspirators in the hold-up near Sunnyside on October 23 when $20,000 was stolen from messengers of the Canadian Express Company.

‘John Lett, when cautioned,’ Detective Mitchell testified, ‘admitted holding up the two messengers at the point of a revolver, taking $20,000, and jumping off the train at Sunnyside, with the money.’

‘Where was it, in a box or safe?’ queried the colonel.

‘Safe, I think,’ replied Mitchell.

‘He admitted throwing a parcel of it away in the High Park district. I later accompanied him there and found the package. It contained $9,000.’

Walter Lett, the detective continued, admitted going to Barrie the day before the arrest and receiving $1,000 from John Lett, knowing it to have been stolen. He further admitted that his brother had come to his farm at Jordan and had told him of the proposed hold-up. He further said that the day after the robbery he came to Toronto to look for John, his brother.

What Dougal Says.
Gordon Dougal admitted, after being cautioned, that John Lett and he met the night prior to the robbery to discuss the robbery. It was arranged then that Dougal was to meet him the morning of the robbery at Sunnyside, which he admitted leaving the house to do. The meeting did not take place. He further admitted after arriving at the Union Station he had a telephone message from Lett about 8 a.m. – a hour after the robbery. Lett told him that he had got the money. Lett said that he was phoning from a church and wanted to know why Dougall didn’t meet him. He told him he had got the money and had hidden it under a rock pile.

In the church the police a black club bag, which belonged to Williamson, the Canadian Express messenger. The bag contained $99.90 in silver and papers belonging to the company.

Cross-examined by Frank Denton, K.C., counsel for the Letts, Detective Mitchell replied that the admissions included references to another man.

‘Did not the admissions allege that this man was the brains behind the hold-up – that he prompted John Lett and Dougal?’ ‘Yes.’

‘Was there any admission that Dougal was to get any of the money?’ asked Mr. W. K. Murphy, counsel for Dougal.

‘That was not suggested.’

‘If the Crown Attorney of the other court wants the other man he is able to get him,’ Col. Denison commented.

Find Reservoirs
The crocks of exhilaration cached beneath the sidewalk belonging to Mrs. Annie Portchuk, Adelaide street west, did not waste their sweetness on the desert air. According to police evidence in the Women’s Court to-day, they formed the reservoir from which the pop bottles which the lady retailed at $3.50 per, were filled. This marks the second time within the week that the Porichucks have moved in court circles. The record of to-day’s visit includes the fine, $200 and costs or three months.

Murdock Henry had a clothes sideline. He pleaded guilty to-day to augmenting his wardrobe with some $50 worth of garments to which he had no right. Most of these, the police stated, had since been recovered. The colonel was told that the quick change of costume set had been Henry’s first bad break. The colonel gave him the right to don the becoming Jail Farm uniform for the next 15 days.

Found guilty of defrauding Mrs. Dorothy Whitaker, wife of a soldier overseas, out of five $100 Victory Bonds, and of stealing an automobile the property of Jas. O’Leary and Ed. Murphy, W. F. Grimwood goes to the Ontario Reformatory.

Mrs. Whitaker stated that she had given him the Victory Bonds, 1917 issue, last November to put in a safe in the Bank of Montreal. She had since asked for them and couldn’t get them. In connection with these, Mr. S.N. Gibbons testified to having sold a motor car to Grimwood for $700. ‘In part payment for this, I received four 1917 Victory Bonds from Grimwood,’ Mr. Gibbons said. Mrs. Whittaker further remarked that she had given Grimwood $1,700 in Government pay checks and her own savings. This she gave him, she said, to invest in the Mossop Hotel, which he told her he was to convert into a club.

Two offenders against the O.T.A. got docked $300 and costs or three months in as many minutes. Harry Hurd was a retailer. He kept the bowl flowing on the broad highway. He that ran might drink, if he stopped and paid $1 for the quencher. John Parker added to the H. C. of L. He likewise retailed. His wee deoch and doris cost $5.50 per. Art Penn both makes and sells. ‘He has his own labels and makes a profitable business of it,’ said the Crown Attorney. Fined $800 and costs or five months.

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George Meeres, “Road building at Mara Lake [British Columbia] by prisoners of war [sic. interned enemy aliens].” Black and white photograph, 1916. Enderby Museum, #3377

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“$9,000 In Bills Found By Police,” Toronto Globe. November 7, 1918. Page 09.

Practically All Stolen From Canadian Express Co. Now Recovered

Covered over with leaves a bag containing $9,000 in bills was found by detectives yesterday afternoon in the yard at the rear of a house on Garden avenue. With this find the police have recovered all but $150 of the $20,000 stolen in the Buffalo express hold-up on October 23. The remaining $150 is alleged to have been spent by John Lett in travelling expenses.

Shackled with handcuffs, John Lett was taken by detectives through the residential section of High Park yesterday to try and locate the spot where he left the money. Before leaving headquarters he drew a map of where he thought he had gone after jumping off the train at Sunnyside. This diagram took the officers to Garden avenue, and after a lengthy search they found the spot. The bag had been thrown over a fence, and was lying between the fence and a chicken coop. It had not been disturbed, and the leaves that partly covered it from view had been blown over it by the wind.
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“Letts and Dougall Get A Remand,” Toronto Globe. November 7, 1918. Page 09.

Alleged Train Bandits Will Appear in Court Next Wednesday

John Lett, the alleged train bandit, Captain Walter Lett, his brother, and J. G. B. Dougall, Chief Clerk of the G. T. R. ticket office, appeared yesterday in the Police Court, and were remanded in custody till Wednesday, November 13th. All three are charged with conspiring to rob the Canadian Express Company of $20,000.

Besides the charge of conspiracy, three charges of robbery were preferred against John Lett as follows: Robbing the express messengers of $20,00, robbing H. S. Fergus of his motor car, and robbing the Union Bank, corner of Church and Wellesley streets of $1,200 last May.

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“Three Men Are Arrested,” Toronto Globe. November 6, 1918. Page 09.

Face Charges in Connection With Express Car Robbery

UNION BANK CASE, TOO

With the arrest of three men yesterday, the police say they have apprehended the persons implacted in the Canadian Express daylight train robbery, when $20,000 in money was stolen on October 23 last on a Grand Trunk train en route from Toronto to Buffalo, the express messengers in charge of the car being ‘held up’ by a bandit between the Union Station and Sunnyside. John Lett, alleged to be the man who robbed the messengers, is also charged with robbing the Church street branch of the Union Bank of Canada on May 2, and obtaining the sum of $1,200. His brother, Walter Lett, was arrested at a downtown hotel, and is held on a charge of conspiracy, and of receiving stolen goods. Early yesterday afternoon Gordon Dougall, 97 Spencer avenue, a clerk in the Grand Trunk ticket office at the Union Station, was also arrested on a charge of conspiracy.

Inspector John Miller of the Provincial Police, Detectives Mitchell, McConnell and Nichols, spent all Monday night searching for John Lett and his brother. Walter was arrested early Tuesday morning, but it was nearly 7 o’clock in the morning when they caught John Lett, who was wearing the uniform of a C Captain in the Canadian army, and had a revolver in his pocket. He made no resistance.

Three Charges of Robbery
Three charges of robbery, with violence, will face John Lett when he appears in Police Court this morning. He will be charged with holding up the two express messengers, George Williamson and William Wilson, and with stealing a motor car from Mr. H. S. Fergus in High Park, under threat of shooting, and with robbing the Union Bank of $1,200. The fourth charge against the prisoner is conspiracy. It is alleged by the police that Dougall, a chief clerk with the Grand Trunk for eight years, conspired with the two Letts to commit the train robbery.

Dougall was to have received a share of the money, the police state, but, owning to John Lett having to make a hurried exit from the city to avoid arrest, did not get his quota.

John Lett, according to the inspector, did the work of holding up the messengers alone, and hid the stolen money. It is charged that he handed over $1,000 to his brother, and, after leaving over $7,00 in a house in Parkdale, buried $9,000 in the residential section of High Park. After getting rid of the money, it is alleged John Lett commandeered Mr. Fergus’ car in High Park, at the point of a revolver, and drove to Midhurst, where the car was abandoned. From Midhurst Lett purchased a ticket to North Bay, and after riding on the line as far as McTier, got off and doubled back to a nearby town. Here he is said by the police to have put on the military uniform of his brother, Walter. He had been out of Toronto until Monday night. The police learned of his coming to the city, and a close lookout was kept for him. Walter Lett was an officer in the army, and went overseas with the 122nd battalion.

$3,100 is Recovered.
Three thousand one hundred dollars was recovered by the detectives yesterday after the arrests. One hundred dollars was found on the top of a boiler of a Methodist church in the west end of the city. Detectives spent yesterday afternoon searching for the remaining amount that was hidden in the High Park district. The police say that they are unable to find the exact spot where the money was placed, and are doubtful that it will ever be found by them. The bills were in small denominations, and it is feared that they have already been found.

John and Walter Lett are the sons of a Barrie family. Recently Walter has been conducting a small fruit farm near Jordan. They are both six feet in height. John is 32 years of age, and Walter 30. Dougall is also a tall, heavy-set man of 28 years of age. Frank Denton, K.C., has been retained to appear on behalf of John and Walter Lett.

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“Veterans Consider Punishment Too Harsh,” Toronto Globe. November 6, 1918. Page 13.

Soldier Sent To Prison Farm For Refusing To Take Electric Treatment.

(Canadian Press Despatch.)
Kingston, Nov. 5. – The Veterans are protesting against the punishment imposed at Toronto on Pte. John Pope of the 80th Battalion, who was given two years, less one day, at Burwash Prison Farm  because he refused to take electrical treatment for shell-shock. The Veterans regarded such punishment as altogether too harsh, and Commandant Evans was directed to take the matter up with the Minister of Militia.

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“Sinn Feiner Gets 15 Years In Prison,” Toronto Globe. September 28, 1918. Page 07.

J. E. Plant’s Sentence Of Death Is Commuted – ‘Conchy’ Given 10 Years.

(Canadian Press Despatch.)
Niagara Camp, Sept. 27. – The first drafted man in camp to be sentenced to death by the general court-martial is John Edward Plant of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Central Ontario Regiment, whose sentence was promulgated this afternoon at a garrison parade. His sentence, however, has been commuted to fifteen years’ imprisonment in the penitentiary at Kingston, and this was read at the promulgation by Captain Roy Parke, Adjutant of the 2nd Battaltion, 2nd C.O.R. Plant is a Sinn Feiner, and refused to perform military service in any capacity.

Johnston Marks of the 2nd Battalion, 2nd C.O.R., who is a conscientious objector and refused to put on uniform, was sentenced to penitentiary for ten years.

Col. K. I. McLaren, Camp Commandant, was in charge of the parade for the promulgation of the sentences.

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“Maj.-Gen. Logie Inspects Troops,” Toronto Globe. September 25, 1918. Page 11.

Railway Const. Draft Going Shortly – Another Death From Spanish ‘Flu.’

(Canadian Press Despatch.)
Niagara Camp, Sept. 24. – Major-Gen. W. A. Logie, G.O.C., came over from Toronto this morning accompanied by Major G. G. Mitchell, and inspected a draft of railway troops that is going to leave camp shortly.

Another death was added last night to the fatalities which have occurred in the Polish camp from Spanish influenza, this making a total of six deaths from the epidemic.

There were about 200 cases of Spanish influenza in the Polish army yesterday, but this number was reduced to-day by discharges of 185.

Pte. John Joseph Noonan of the 2nd Battalion, Central Ontario Regiment, who deserted from a draft while in Toronto on the way east on July 27, and was apprehended on August 31st, in Toronto, was sentenced by district court martial here to Kingston Penitentiary for two years, and was taken to Kingston this morning.

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“Erring Soldiers Punished,” Toronto Globe. September 24, 1918. Page 03.

One Goes to Penitentiary For Desertion, Another For Theft.

(Special Despatch to The Globe.)
London, Ont., Sept. 23. – Pte. Gerald Drouillard was sentenced to-day at London, Ont. to two years in Kingston Penitentiary by Magistrate Graydon for desertion. He was a former 142nd Battalion man.

Pte. William Howie, FCOC, sixty-five years of age, charged with stealing Government supplies from a warehouse where army goods are stored, was sentenced to three years in Kingston Penitentiary. Howie was employed as a night guard when he committed the thefts.

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“Two Years at Kingston,” Toronto Globe. September 12, 1918. Page 03.

Highway Robber Pleaded Not to be Sent Back to Burwash.

(Canadian Press Despatch.)
Brantford, Sept. 11 – Clarence Brackenbury was sentenced to two years in the Penitentiary at Kingston by Judge Hardy to-day, on charges of highway robbery while in possession of a loaded revolver, of theft, and of damage to a St. George schoolhouse. He and a young lad set out as Dick Turpins on stolen bicycles, and held up a farmer near St. George. Brackenbury had previously broken jail at Simcoe, and was captured again at Burwash. He begged for a chance to go overseas, and when this was refused, pleaded not to be sent to Burwash, where, he alleged, he had been badly treated, the food he claimed, being very bad. His request was granted, and he will go to Kingston for two years.

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“Wounded Soldier Sentenced to Jail,” Toronto Globe. September 1, 1916. Page 08.

Attorney-General Authorizes His Liberation That He May Attend Reception.

The ‘boys’ in a western Ontario city were apparently exceedingly good to a war-scarred returned soldier, with the result that the latter, as the result of his imbibing too freely, landed himself in court and was sentenced to thirty days in jail. Last night a reception was held in the city in honor of returned soldiers, and before the ceremony thoughts fastened on the unfortunate victim doing ‘time’ while the band was playing outside. Accordingly, an effort was set on foot to have the prisoner, who had valorously served his country, released, and the Attorney-General, who was communicated with yesterday afternoon, without any hesitation took the human view and authorized the soldier’s liberation. 

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“At Niagara Camp – Alleged Canadian Deserter Poses as U.S. Officer,” Toronto Globe. August 22, 1918. Page 07.

(Canadian Press Despatch.)
Niagara Camp, Ont. Aug. 21. – W. B. Buckner of the Canadian Railway Troops Depot is in detention here in the uniform of an American military officer. He is charged with desertion, and is said to have cut quite a swatch across the border in the guise of an officer of the United States. A private’s uniform is being prepared for him, as his present appearance is not regarded as in keeping with a Canadian soldier under arrest.

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“No Jury For The Inquest Being Held Today,” Sudbury Star. August 21, 1918. Page 03.

Witnessses to Tell Story of the Shooting of Defaulter.

The inquest into the death of Cyprien Gareau, the Blezard Valley defaulter shot by Dominion Officer Tougher at a farm house last Saturday morning, is taking place this afternoon before Coroner Dr. W. R. Patterson, without a jury. The body has been at Henry’s morgue since last Saturday.

SHOT AT UNDERTAKERS.
Undertakers who went to the farm house at Blezard last Saturday afternoon report having been shot at from the bush, near the house, several times, while several automobiles have also reported that they have heard bullets whiz by in the same locality. While the police do not place much credence on the reports of shooting, which they attribute more or less to imagination, the undertakers are emphatic they heard the reports of the rifles and the whiz of the bullets close to their rig. It was while returning with the body that the shooting incident occurred.

OFFICERS GIVEN SAFE CONDUCT
In direct contrast to the visit of the undertakers is that on Monday afternoon o provincial officers headed by Inspector Storie. The inspector reports he drove purposely past the spot from which the shots were supposed to come, and all was peace and quiet. This may be accounted for, however, by the fact that a brother of one of the defaulters who is at large was in the vehicle with the officer.

There seems to be no doubt but what there was shooting. The undertakers say they met several soldiers, belonging to the district and home on harvest leave. The soldiers took to the bush as soon as the firing started. They later emerged with their tunics under their arms.

STORIES VARY SOMEWHAT
Visits to the scene of the shooting were paid by Inspector Storie on Monday and again on Tuesday. An investigation was conducted and witnesses subpoenaed for the inquest. The Inspector found that the stories of the Dominion Police and that of the relatives of the deceased man tally up fairly well, except that there is a difference of opinion as to who fired the first shot. Those at the farm house say the officers fired first, but this is not borne out by the investigation. 

FOUR BULLET MARKS
There are four bullet marks inside the house. These bear out the story of the Dominion officers that the first shot, from which Officer Tougher bears powder marks on his face, passed through the roof of the lean-to of the house, where the deceased man was located when Tougher pulled back the curtain. The bullet mark is in the roof. There is also a bullet hole in the front door, which tallies up with the police story that a shot was fired through the closed door at the officers as they were retiring from the house. The next shot was apparently fired by Tougher after the door had been re-opened. This shot passed through the body of the dead man, who was apparently standing in the door of the bedroom, hit a knob on the bedpost and careened off into the wall. There is also a shot in the window sill, also fired from the inside, which so far has not been connected up with the story, unless it was fired to scare the officers away.

MAY GIVE HIMSELF UP
Hopes are held out that a younger Gareau, brother of deceased, also a defaulter, will give himself up before the inquest. Relatives have given the police assurance that they will advise the young man to take this course, and it was hoped that he would surrender on Monday, but the plan did not materialize. The authorities were given assurance that he would be produced before August 24th, the last day of pardon extended by the Minister of Justice.

Crown Attorney Miller is acting for the Crown at the inquest and Mr. B. Boutet for the family of the deceased. Mr. Boutet has also paid a visit to the scene of the shooting.

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“Garson Farmer Faces Charge Of Harboring,” Sudbury Star. August 21, 1918. Page 03.

Dominion Police State Edward Martell Is Hiding Cousin.

The first charge of harboring a deserter to be laid by the Dominion Police at Sudbury was read in Monday morning’s police court, against Edward Martell, Garson township. He is charged with harboring John Martell, his cousin, a deserter from the C.E.F. The case was adjourned until Saturday morning next. It is understood that the court is prepared to take a lenient view of the case providing that in the meantime Pte. Martell, the deserter, is delivered to the military. B. Boutet appeared for accused Monday morning and entered a plea of not guilty.

While this is the first charge of harboring to be instituted by the Dominion Police, there have been many instances where prosecution could have been started for harboring, aiding and abetting. Flagrant cases have been known to the police, in which the mothers of the offenders have played important parts and it was mainly for this reason that no action was taken.

MORE SHOOTING
More shooting is reported from Garson township in addition to that which took place and is daily taking place in Blezard township. The Dominion police last Thursday went out to the Edward Martell farm in Garson township and while making enquiries at the farm house were shot at by some one, presumably John Martell, the deserter, who was concealed in the barn. He later made good his escape to the bush and is still at large.

BOOZE BURIED IN GROUND
The Ontario Temperance Act is no respecter of persons. It may happen that Luigi Augustini, hard working man and the father of five young children, one of whom is very sick, may have to go to jail for three months. There is, however, another side to the story, that of Chief Brown, of the municipal police.

The hardship plea failed to move the court Monday morning when Augustini was fined $300 and costs. A few days ago one Koski, up on a drunk charge, disclosed the source of his supply, a case being later found buried beside the Augustini residence. The plea that some one else had buried the case beside the house was also put forth, the possibilities of which were dwelt upon eloquently and at some length by Mr. J. A. Mulligan, counsel for accused. Magistrate Brodie also turned a deaf ear to this plea.

But all’s well that ends well, and there is a chance now that kind friends will come to the rescue of the poor, hard-working Augustini and pay his fine, the authorities having agreed to a recess until Saturday next.

THREE MEN AND A GIRL
A pretty, young French-Canadian girl of eighteen summers, Cecile Gatien, who originally hails from Montreal and has been in these parts but two weeks, was found in a house Saturday night with three Austrians. Provincial Constable Grassick was out that way on another mission Saturday night last when three autos in front of the house attracted his attention. All lights had been darkened on the autos and he was unable to secure numbers as they scurried away. There is a suspicion that they were licensed jitneys. Several complaints about the house have been made to the police.

Two of the men came from Murray Mine and for that reason the charge of leaving their place of residence without the permission of the police failed. The magistrate held that as there was no registrar at Murray Mine, and as Stobie and Murray are in the same municipality, this charge could not succeed. The third young foreigner, however, come from Garson, which made $10 and costs difference.

On a charge of being frequenters of a house of ill fame and three men pleaded guilty and paid $10 and costs.

The young girl pleaded guilty to being a keeper, her counsel asking a week’s remand, which was granted. She has a lover, a young Italian, it is understood, who is willing to go to the altar with the erring girl, and in case the marriage materializes the leniency of the court for a chance to make good will be asked.

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