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Posts Tagged ‘youth delinquency’

“At midnight on Oct. 1, 2018, New York’s Raise the Age law went into effect, ending the state’s practice of automatically charging young people as adults at age 16. It also required New York City to move all 16- and 17-year-olds out of the infamously brutal Rikers Island jail complex and into the Horizon juvenile detention center in the Bronx.

Mayor Bill de Blasio heralded the move as a significant victory. “Beginning today,” he said, “no one under 18 will go to Rikers Island. Kids will be treated like kids instead of adults.”

Yet from the start, that mission was subverted. When fights broke out the very first week among detainees, injuring correction officers, their union was adamant that they could only restore order by using the same level of force they were authorized to use at Rikers. Surveillance video of brawling adolescents was released to the media, and correction officers told reporters they feared for their lives. On Oct. 10, the state granted a waiver allowing guards to use OC pepper spray on youth. (That plan has since been delayed while city and state officials negotiate its use, which is prohibited in juvenile facilities.)

Raise the Age was intended to shield children from the horrors of the adult criminal justice system. Yet, New York’s implementation of the plan seems to have merely transported the culture of violence from Rikers Island to Horizon.

There are reasons for that. The law mandated that young people be removed from Rikers, but authorized the same agency—the city’s Department of Correction—to help run the adolescent detention centers where they were moved, alongside program staff from the Administration for Children’s Services (ACS). And because ACS could not hire enough “youth development specialists” by the Oct. 1 deadline, correction officers—whose horrific abuse of teenagers brought a federal lawsuit and consent decree to Rikers—are still guarding them in juvenile detention.

These correction officers and their union have painted the teens as dangerous, violent, and predatory criminals who can only be controlled by force. But the city itself seems to have bought into the logic that the adolescents from Rikers would bring with them a culture of violence too intense for ACS alone to handle.

To prepare for their arrival, the city relocated youth charged as juvenile delinquents to its Crossroads facility in Brooklyn, fearing the adolescents from Rikers would victimize them. It renovated Horizon to make it even more secure: reinforced cells, a larger control room, an arsenal of riot control gear, and plexiglass barriers in the cafeteria to keep youth from having contact with kitchen staff. New York City achieved getting the youth off Rikers, but in the process it has “Rikerized” Horizon.

These changes reflect a lack of faith in New York’s young people and the city’s ability to serve them. Teens are remarkably adept at living up to exactly what we expect of them. If we create an environment that anticipates violence, they will behave as expected. But research shows that if we treat them with love and respect, then young people—even the most traumatized, difficult, and challenging among them—will respond in kind.

I know that from my own experience running a mentoring program for court-involved youth in the South Bronx. But I’ve also seen a different approach to the same challenge playing out in the nation’s capital.

On the same day that New York’s Raise the Age law went into effect, the District of Columbia hit a deadline for removing youth charged as adults from the D.C. Correctional Treatment Facility. Prior to the transfer, they had been subject to the same conditions as the youth on Rikers. Correction officers were authorized to use brute force, OC pepper spray, mechanical restraints, and 23-hour lockdown as tools of control.

At the New Beginnings facility run by the Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services (DYRS), they were met by youth development specialists instead of corrections officers. These adolescents look no different than the youth coming from Rikers. They are also 16- and 17-year-olds and have been charged with serious and violent felony offenses. But since they arrived at New Beginnings, there have been no outbreaks of violence, no physical restraints, and no need for pepper spray. They sleep in their own housing unit, but are otherwise fully integrated with their peers during school, meals, and recreational time. I asked one of the staff members if the youth they call “Title 16” (after the statute that lets them be charged as adults) were different from their delinquency cases. “Nah,” he said, “they’re all just kids.””

– Rubén Austria, “MOVING TEENS OFF RIKERS ISLAND WAS A GOOD FIRST STEP. NOW COMES THE HARD PART.” The Appeal. November 1, 2018.

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“They Much Prefer To Be ‘Good Boys’,” Victoria Times, Sunday Magazine. October 20, 1951.

Young First Offenders Find Reclamation In Forest Camps

By GORDON FORBES

A human experiment in treatment of youthful first offenders has paid off a grattifying 100 per cent for the British Columbia Forestry Service.

On June 19 this year 12 lads were taken from Oakalla Prison to a forestry camp at Kettle Valley in the Nelson area. They were young men who ha come into conflict with the law through the over-exuberance of their youth.

The boys were given exactly the same treatment as hundreds of other youths in 10 other forestry department ‘youth training camps.’ They did the same work. Only difference was that they composed a complete camp of first offenders.

CLEAN RECORD
Lands and Forests Minister E. T. Kenney, who originated the plan, reports now that there was not ‘a single defection’ during the summer-long camp.

The boys are not treated as criminals. In fact, the very important thing about the camp is that they are separated from chronic criminals. If they had remained in prison they might have associated with hardened criminals and emerged the worse for the experience.

The camp was supervised by the district forest ranger and the boys came under the direct supervision of ‘custodian’ Robert Deildal, appointed by the penal institution.

Treated as potential citizens, with a great contribution to make to the state and society, the boys responded by co-operating to the fullest.

The forestry service anticipates their progress and co-operation to the point where they may eventually find permanent employment with the forest industry or administration. 

Officials are intending to expand this branch of their work materially. The success of this initial camp undoubtedly will spur this effort.

The boys are employed on construction of forest-protection roads and trails, slash disposal to reduce fire hazard and fight fires. Several of them have been used by forest rangers on compass work and surveying.

The boys are paid $3 a day, but only receive 50 cents of that. The rest is held back and credited to them.

FULL FREEDOM.
They are given as much freedom as boys in the regular camps. On occasion, they go to nearby dances or movies. The forestry department also has shipped in a projector and equipment to show films in a small settlement next to the camp.

The forest service feels it is getting a good dollar’s worth of service from every dollar expended. In addition, the youths are being given an opportunity to expend their energy, ingenuity and enthusiasm – on projects essential to the economy of the province.

Moreover, they are spending a summer amid beautiful and peaceful surroundings and learning a useful vocation that will be in continuous demand in this forested province.

Someone once said: ‘Man is at his best when pitted against Nature.’

In all the forest services youth camps this summer there was a total of nearly 150 boys. They all received $3 a day plus board and transportation to and from their homes.

The idea of a youth-use in conjunction with the forest resource is not a new conception by any means, but previous projects of this nature (exclusive of the first offenders’ camp idea which was first done this year) have unfortunately had their genesis in a depression period.

The present development is distinctive in that it came into being in 1949 when employment was available to all.

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“Prison Terms Are Meted Out,” Hamilton Spectator. October 8, 1938. Page 01.

Three Years For Costello, Two For MacAvella Imposed By Court

A
total of six years in prison terms was imposed on three men who
appeared before three men who appeared before Judge Ernest F. Lazier in
county criminal court Friday afternoon.

Frank Costello, aged 21,
one of a family of seven children, was sentenced to three years in
Kingston penitentiary when he pleaded guilty to four charges of theft of
automobiles.

Douglas MacAvella was sentenced to two years in
Kingston penitentiary when he was convicted of the theft if six auto
batteries from the Super-Lastic Sales corporation. He was acquitted of
the theft of an automobile.

Albert Peddie was given a one-year
term sentence for theft imposed in magistrate’s court, when Judge Lazler
convicted him of breaking into the garage of Robert McKee, Cannon street
and Sanford avenue, and the theft of electric drills and other tools
from it.

Appearing for Costello, Joseph D. Sullivan said he had a
‘heart to heart’ talk with him at the jail, but could only account for
his misdemeanours by his disposition toward recklessness.

‘I agree
with Mr. Sullivan that a reformatory term would have no effect in
redeeming him’ said George W. Ballard, K.C., crown attorney, handing
Costello’s record card to the judge.

Detective Albert Speakman
testified as to auto thefts in August and September when cars were stolen
belonging to James Ray, Grimsby Beach; Hertbert Ticker, Toronto; Harold
Jaggard, Cathcart street, and R. A. Bergdorf, York street.

Car Smashed
Mr. Tucker’s car was found near Dunnville badly smashed, Detective Speakman told the court.

Called
by the crown to testify in the MacAvella case, two young women and a
young man who were playing tennis on the courts of the First United
church, said they saw the accused carry batteries and place them in a
car on August 26. Judge Lazier found there was insufficient evidence to
justify his conviction for auto theft.

MacAvella denied theft of
the batteries, and added he had obligingly thrown back two tennis balls to
the young people who had testified against him.

In Peddie’s case,
Detective Speakman told of stopping the accused in his car, finding a
wrecking bar, hacksaw, tools and a large pair of snips. Robert McKee,
proprietor of a garage which was broken into, identified some of the
tools by his initials on them.

MacAvella and Peddie were without
counsel. Both had records. The convicted trio were led from the court
room, their hands manacled together.

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“Youth Leaves Jail To Work Out Fine,” The Globe and Mail. October 7, 1948. Page 02.

At the request of Major Alec MacMillan of the Salvation Army, 16-year-old Terry Smith of Sackville St. was released from Don Jail Tuesday night. Terry, convicted of ill-treating a kitten, was unable to pay a $50 fine, and was sentenced to 10 days in jail by Magistrate Thomas Elmore.

Major MacMillan said Terry was a ‘good boy,’ and would work to raise money to meet the $50 fine.
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“Faces Sentence In Taxi Robbery,”

The Globe and Mail. October 7, 1948. Page 02.


David Cameron, 24, will be sentenced today by Magistrate Thomas Elmore after being convicted yesterday of robbing taxi driver John Kusian about two weeks ago. Kusian charged that Cameron had placed a butcher knife against his back and robbed him of $16.

Cameron faces sentence on four additional charges; Breaking into a service station on Fleet St., possession of an offensive weapon, attempted break-in of a second service station on Front St., and escape from Burwash Reformatory.

Cameron, 24 years old, escaped from reformatory on Sept. 9, and was said to have committed all the misdemeanors since the date. He pleaded guilty to all except the armed robbery charge.

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“Joy Riders Sentenced,” Toronto Globe. September 5, 1918. Page 07.

Stiff sentences were meted out in the Police Court yesterday morning to two young men who went for a joy ride in an automobile they found conveniently on the street. Joseph Murphy, who had a previous record, was sentenced to two years in the penitentiary, while Ernest Young was sent to the Ontario Reformatory for one year.

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“There was, in his opinion, in the present day, altogether too much of that maudlin sentimentality abroad in the world, which extended charity to vice at the expense of honesty and industry,…which sympathized with crime, and neglected the really honest man…He thought the best punishment was to tie them up and give them a good thrashing; he would whip them and send them to bed. It was really too absurd to talk of a moral school for such characters. He would be glad to see a house of correction in the rear of each prison, where they would be taken, tied up, and treated in the way he had pointed out.”

– Member of Parliament William Dunlop, Legislative Assembly, Debates of the Legislative Assembly of United Canada. 1843, p. 383.

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“Philanthropists did a pedagogic Jekyll and Hyde by hailing the family as the ideal place to raise children and at the same time creating the re-education home where children were to be re-educated outside the family, torn away from their parents and siblings.”

– Jeroen Dekker, The Will to Change the Child: Re-education Homes for Children at Risk in Nineteenth Century Western Europe. New York: Peter Lang, 2001. p.39

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“Burglars Are Sent Down,” Toronto Globe. August 7, 1918. Page 02.

Brockville, Aug. 6 – (Special.) – Alfred Picard, Alfred Rogers and Napoleon Deladure Utayne of Montreal, convicted of burglarizing Doyle Bros.’ store at Prescott recently, were sentenced to-day to two years each in Kingston Penitentiary. A fourth man, Wilfred Pressau, was given a year in the Ontario Reformatory. The first three named had previous convictions.

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“Destructive Boys To Get Strapping,” Toronto Star. July 30, 1938. Page 05.

Caused Damage at Western Ontario Fair Grounds

London, Ont., July 30. – Two 11-year-old boys, convicted of causing extensive damage to buildings in the Western Ontario Fairground buildings, were sent to the York Street Observation Home for a ‘sound’ strapping, under orders issued yesterday by Magistrate Donald B. Menzies in juvenile court.

Four boys were involved in the affair in which windows were smashed, telephone booths wrecked and showcases broken, but the other two were so young they could not be charged in any court.

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“Toronto Holdups Laid To Three Youths,” Globe and Mail. July 27, 1939. Page 13.

Police Squads Make Arrests In Two Raids

Young Men Identified by Victims in Lineup at Station

John Kelly, Charles Long and John Losse Are Nabbed

The arrest yesterday of three youths on charges of armed robbery, theft, and illegal possession of firearms ended the extensive five-day investigation into at least three of the recent drug stores holdups in Toronto and East York.

Also taken into custody and later released were three girls, none more than 20 years of age, who were, the police said, with the suspects when squads of detectives, augmented by East York Police, simultaneously raided two downtown rooming-houses.

The three charged are: John Kelly, 23, of Matilda Street; John Losee, 21, and Charles Long, 21, both of Pembroke Street.

Kelly is charged with the armed robbery of a drug store on Eglinton Avenue at midnight Sunday, and the other two with holding up two East York drug stores. Charges of stealing an automobile and a set of license markers were also laid against Losee and Long.

Two Men Injured.
Both these men bore marks of injuries. The car driven by two men who held up Fred Sadlier’s drug store in East York last Friday was completely wrecked when it crashed into a tree. The police linked the hurts with the accident which followed the holdup with which the men are charged. Long may have a fractured shoulder and his companion is bruised.

Kelly was caught in his rooming-house on Matilda Street, where the police believe he hid a revolver in the water reservoir. A nickel-plated revolver was recovered by Sergeant of Detectives John Hicks and Detective John Nimmo. Kelly is charged with the illegal possession of the gun.

Identified in Lineup.
At the same time, Detective-Sergeant William McAllister, Detectives John Scott and William French kicked in the door of a room in a house on Pembroke Street and arrested Long. In another room Losee was arrested.

Chief Inspector of Detectives John Chisholm and Chief Constable Ernest Old of East York both expressed satisfaction with the cooperation of the city and suburban forced in tracking down the supsects. The three men were identified in a lineup at Police Headquarters yesterday afternoon. Four other victims of holdups during the past week viewed the suspects, but were unable to identity them, it was learned.

Later, after the three youths, manacled together, were removed to the cells; the girls were released.

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“Truant Surrenders Having Seen Circus,” Toronto Globe. July 21, 1933. Page 10.

Wish Expressed to Return to Victoria Industrial School, Mimico

Kenneth Neely, 18-year-old inmate of Victoria Industrial School, Mimico, who has been missing for some days from that institution, yesterday walked into the Central Police Station at Detroit, and surrendered. To the officer in charge, young Neely, with some satisfaction, expressed his desire to return to the school, having explained how he had achieved an ambition of many years’ standing.

‘They let me out from the school to look for another lad who had escaped. While I was away I saw a poster advertising a big circus, the one thing I had longed to see for five years,’ he told the police. Saying he had gratified his ambition, he added: ‘And, say, it was just swell.’

Neely, who was serving a term for stealing a car at Niagara Falls, is being held pending the arrival of an officer from the school to bring him back.

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“City Items,” Montreal Daily Witness, July 12, 1871. Page 03.

Mary Ann Sullivan, a girl of only 10 years of age, who recently escaped from the Reformatory, was arrested yesterday by Constables Armor and Martel, and to-day was sent back to the Reformatory.

Escaped. – Yesterday a boy named Louis Vian, aged 15 years, was arrested by the detectives on suspicion of being concerned in the Gault outrage. The circumstantial evidence against him was very strong, and a handkerchief which belonged to Mr. Gault was also found in his possession. After his arrest, he was put in the cell along with other prisoners to await examination at the Police Court to-day. During the night, however, Master Louis Vian managed to effect his escape by, it is believed, crawling through the ventilator in the cell door. The aperture in question is less than nine inches square, and Vian must have been very dexterous in getting through and afterwards clearing off from the building without being noticed. Three or four persons previously arrested on suspicion of being concerned in the Gault outrage, were to-day shown to Mr. Gault, but the latter failed to recognize any of them, and they were sent to jail as vagrants.

Attempted Imposition By A Carter. – Until cabmen are peremptorily and severly dealt with, their daily tricks and impositions on the public will never be put down. Charles Lapointe, 21, carter, who resides in Craig street, was charged at the Recorder’s Coourt to-day with refusing hire. It appears that on Tuesday morning Mr. Treasurer Black came off the Quebec boat and prisoner was one of several cabmen who solicited hire. Mr. Black hired Lapointe, who on second thoughts wanted to know where he was going, and if to a fire, and finally, with an oath, refused to drive him. Chief Penton gave Lapointe anything but a good character, and His Honor said that this system of carters bullying people and levying black mail must be stopped; and every case proven would be severely punished. Lapointe was fined $8 or one month in jail.

Loafing Vagrants. – At present there seems to be an unusually large number of loafing vagrants about the city. Louis Deschamp, 35, alias Leon Richer, laborer, from St. Urbain street; Michel Dubois, 34, laborer, St. Dominique steet; Xavier Beauvais, 27, carter, carter, Papineau Road, and a disreputable woman named Adeline Lefebvre, 29, were arrested at 5 o’clock this morning by sub-Constables McCormicck and Depatie, who had watched the gang for some two hours previous, when they were in a field off Sherbrooke street. At the Recorder’s Court to-day, it was stated that the prisoners are strongly suspected of being concerned in some recent robberies, and His Honor committed them each for two months; also Joseph Dupont, 20, vagrant, from Campeau street, against whom the detectives are working up a case of burglary.

Sarah Alcock, 44, an old vagrant, Mary Ann Lanigan, 29, and Elizabeth Dunn, 29, both found loitering on Champs de Mars, were each committed for a month; also Mary Ann McDonnell, 45, and Ann Meaney, 23, who were found in a drunken disgraceful state on Logan’s Farm. His Honor said that a law would soon be in force, by which vagrants for second offence may be committed for two years.

Alphonese Labreque, 24, laborer, and who, the police stated, was the ‘fancy man’ of the keeper of a brothel, was arrested along with Joseph St. Jean, 27, stone-cutter, loitering with a prostitute, and they were each fined $2.50 or 15 days in jail.

POLICE COURT – WEDNESDAY. – A woman who was arrested on a charge of breaking a pane of glass in the door of E. Costello, was discharged for lack of evidence.

Edmund Fegan 62, a vagrant from Common street, was arrested for stealing coal on the wharf and was committed as a vagrant for two months,

Eliza O’Brien, wife of James Mourney, of Colborne Avenue, was charged with using insulting language to Catherine Mullins, wife of James Mourney, Jr., and was fined $10.75, including costs, or fifteen days in all.

Damase Piebe, shoemaker for assaulting Augustin Guibord, was fine $7 including costs or 15 days.

George Clarke, Fil, alias Williamson, alias Henderson, charged with stealing four billiard balls belonging to Mr. Chadwick, St. James street, was remanded for examination. The balls were found in his possession, but Clarke says he brought them with him from the United States early in June last.

RECORDER’S COURT – Wednesday – This morning the sheet contained fifty cases, and nearly one-third of those were persons arrested in connection with a house of ill-fame in St. Elizabeth street, where the police made a raid last night. With such a programme before the Court it was no wonder that the place was thronged by those peculiar and miscellaneous personages, the largest proportion of whom are of a vicious character, who watch the rise and fall of the criminal barometer with an interest that is whetted and increasing in proportion as the details are disgusting.

Frederic Lafontaine, 32, agent, or manager of the Toronto House and Edward Rheaume, 24, shoemaker, who got quarrelling and attempted to fight at the door of the above tavern, were each fined $2.50 or 15 days in jail.

Fabien Beaudouin, 22, carter, drunk in Notre Dame street; Daniel Murphy, 40, agent from Quebec, drunk in St. Paul street; François Ganthier, 48, blacksmith, drunk in Panet street; Michael MccGeary, 36, laborer, drunk, in Commissioner street; J. Bte. Deslauriers, 52, laborer, drunk in St Paul street; J. Bte. Braurmter, 58, laborer, drunk in Perthius street; Jos. Power, 19, laborer, drunk in Manufacturer street, and Daniel Gibson, 34, a respectably dressed man, drunk in Cahboulez Square Fire Station, also a woman, were each fined in small sums for being drunk; while Richard McDonnell, 27, baker, drunk in the city cars, was fine $2 or 15 days.

George McNeil, 32, shoemaker, and George McNulty, 55, laborer, both drunk in Lacroi street, and insulting people, were each fined $2.50 or 15 days.

Joseph Howie, 26, shoemaker, was fined $5 or 30 days, for loitering in Campean street with a prostitute, named Adeline Lefebvre, 39, who was committed for a month.

Thomas Cleary, 29, mechanic, residing in Dorchester street, got drunk last night, and was smashing the furniture and threatened to throw his wife out of the window. As the wife failed to appear, Cleary was let off with a fine of $2.50 or 15 days in jail.

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“Police Pick Up Two Lads; Notify Industrial School,” Toronto Globe. July 12, 1933. Page 02.

(Special Despatch to The Globe.)
Welland, July 11. – Welland police today were in communication with the authorities of the Mimico Industrial School relative to two lads picked up here late Monday. Rushing to Cook’s Mills after receiving a call from Mrs. Hall at that place. Police Chief Davies and Sergeant Anderson of the Welland force picked up William JOnes, aged 17, who hails from Thorold, and William McClelland, 17, Peterboro’.

The lads had called at Mrs. Hall’s home on Douglas Street asking for food, and thinking one of them might be the missing boys, immediately informed Welland police. On questioning the lads, police learned that McClelland had escaped from Mimico Industrial School on Saturday, and that Jones, who was formerly at Mimico, had made a getaway from his place of parole.

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“Bad Boy Makes Escape,” Kingston Daily Standard. July 11, 1912. Page 02.

A boy under twelve years old, who was convicted in the children’s court of theft and forgery and sentenced to two years in the Industrial school escaped when being taken to the railway station.

“Rained In Portsmouth,” Kingston Daily Standard. July 11, 1912. Page 02.

A remarkable phenomenon was witnessed on Tuesday in connection with the rain which fell in the surrounding district. Rain fell heavily in parts of Portsmouth, but while the Penitentiary received a copious drenching, not a drop fell on this side of it. It also rained heavily at Kingston Mills.

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“Three Years in Kingston For Daniel Gerome,” Hamilton Spectator. July 9, 1918. Page 01.

Man Who Wielded Knife Must Also Pay $500 

Another Foreign Stabbing Affray Aired In Court

Bicycle Thief Given Term in Local Jail

Three years in Kingston penitentiary and a fine of five hundred dollars was the sentence handed out by Judge Gauld to-day to Daniel Gerome, who stabbed M. Gaspar. Two hundred dollars of the fine will go to the injured man.

IN passing sentence his honor pointed out the seriousness of the offence, and also observed that the depletions of the police force by the M.S.A. might tend to cause individuals to take the law more in their own hands.

If the fine is not paid two more years will be tacked on to the sentence.

R. J. McKenna was the prisoner’s solicitor.

CASE ADJOURNED
Anthony Ponsoni and Umbuti Scaccki were charged with assaulting Roceo Celesto.

Colesto claimed one of the prisoners met him in a store on Sherman avenue and challenged him to a fight.

The man stood with clenched hands in his pockets, and then Celesto decided to get in the first wallop. When the trio got outside the two men, he alleged, attacked him. One of them three a stone, which knocked him down, and the other jumped on him and slashed him with a razer. Celesto showed the court various wounds about the head and neck, alleged to have been inflicted in this manner.

Miss Annie Otto, a nurse at the city hospital, who attended Celesto, testified that if the cuts about the head had been a little deeper the patient might have died.

The case was adjourned until this afternoon at 2 o’clock.

M. J. O’Reilly, K.C., is acting for the prisoners.

THREE MONTHS
Although Harry Case pleaded not guilty to the charge of stealing a bicycle from Charles Lovett on June 14, and insisted he bought the wheel for $8, his horror sentenced him to three months in jail. Constable McLean laid the charge. C. W. Bell represented the prisoner.

SUSPENDED AND REMANDED
T. A. Cutss, a mechanic in the Royal Air Force, who was accused of stealing a car, was allowed to go suspended setence. Pte. William Smith, who was arrested along with him on the same charge, was again remanded for sentence. Smith, it appears, was the instigator of the act. He asked Cutts to go for a ride with him, it was stated.

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